27

How do I find the 10 largest files in a directory structure?

39

Try this script

Get-ChildItem -re -in * |
  ?{ -not $_.PSIsContainer } |
  sort Length -descending |
  select -first 10

Breakdown:

The filter block "?{ -not $_.PSIsContainer }" is meant to filter out directories. The sort command will sort all of the remaining entries by size in descending order. The select clause will only allow the first 10 through so it will be the largest 10.

  • That's great ---- I figured out how to format the final result using format-table but what I"m not clear on is the syntax ?{ } and the $_ I'm guessing these are shortforms for some statement construct? – Ralph Shillington Apr 28 '09 at 14:20
  • 2
    The ?{} syntax is short for where-object which is a filter expression. Essentially powershell will pass every object to the ?{} clause in the from of $_. If the return is $true, then the object will continue down the pipeline, otherwise it will be filtered out. – JaredPar Apr 28 '09 at 14:28
  • 1
    this is memory intensive command and propotional to the size of content being searched I guess. – Ankush Jun 11 '12 at 10:56
33

This can be simplified a bit because Directories have no length:

gci . -r | sort Length -desc | select fullname -f 10
  • +1 I'll use this in the future (less typing). – Ralph Shillington May 2 '09 at 1:38
  • 3
    Plus the '.' isn't even required. Could simplify that front part to just "gci -r | ..." since the default path is the current dir. – Keith Hill May 2 '09 at 6:02
3

I've blogged about a similar problem where I want to find the largest files in a directory AND all subdirectories (the entire C: drive for example), as well as list their size in a nice easy to understand format (GB, MB, and KB). Here's the PowerShell function I use that lists all files sorted by size in a nice Out-GridView:

Get-ChildItem -Path 'C:\SomeFolder' -Recurse -Force -File 
        | Select-Object -Property FullName
             ,@{Name='SizeGB';Expression={$_.Length / 1GB}}
             ,@{Name='SizeMB';Expression={$_.Length / 1MB}}
             ,@{Name='SizeKB';Expression={$_.Length / 1KB}} 
        | Sort-Object { $_.SizeKB } -Descending 
        | Out-GridView

Outputting to the GridView is nice because it allows you to easily filter the results and scroll through them. This is the faster PowerShell v3 version, but the blog post also shows a slower PowerShell v2 compatible version.

And of course if you only want the top 10 largest files, you could just add a -First 10 parameter to the Select-Object call.

0

If you care about a bit of formatting of the result-set, here are two functions with nicer-looking outputs:

#Function to get the largest N files on a specific computer's drive
Function Get-LargestFilesOnDrive
{
Param([String]$ComputerName = $env:COMPUTERNAME,[Char]$Drive = 'C', [Int]$Top = 10)
Get-ChildItem -Path \\$ComputerName\$Drive$ -Recurse | Select-Object Name, @{Label='SizeMB'; Expression={"{0:N0}" -f ($_.Length/1MB)}} , DirectoryName,  Length | Sort-Object Length -Descending  | Select-Object Name, DirectoryName, SizeMB -First $Top | Format-Table -AutoSize -Wrap    
}

#Function to get the largest N files on a specific UNC path and its sub-paths
Function Get-LargestFilesOnPath
{
    Param([String]$Path = '.\', [Int]$Top = 10)
    Get-ChildItem -Path $Path -Recurse | Select-Object Name, @{Label='SizeMB'; Expression={"{0:N0}" -f ($_.Length/1MB)}} , DirectoryName,  Length | Sort-Object Length -Descending  | Select-Object Name, DirectoryName, SizeMB -First $Top | Format-Table -AutoSize -Wrap
}
  • Seems that it doesn't answer original question. – Yaroslav Shabalin Mar 14 '14 at 13:06
0

Here is the fastest way to get this done I am aware of:

$folder  = "$env:windir" # forder to be scanned
$minSize = 1MB

$stopwatch =  [diagnostics.stopwatch]::StartNew()

$ErrorActionPreference = "silentlyContinue"
$list = New-Object 'Collections.ArrayList'
$files = &robocopy /l "$folder" /s \\localhost\C$\nul /bytes /njh /njs /np /nc /fp /ndl /min:$minSize
foreach($file in $files) {
    $data = $file.split("`t")
    $null = $list.add([tuple]::create([uint64]$data[3], $data[4]))
}

$list.sort() # sort by size ascending
$result = $list.GetRange($list.count-10,10) 
$result | select item2, item1 | sort item1 -Descending

$stopwatch.Stop()
$t = $stopwatch.Elapsed.TotalSeconds
"done in $t sec."
-1

The basic one to get the top 10 biggest files into the local directory use h for human-readable, S sort file by size :

ls -Sh -l |head -n 10

or you can use

du -ha /home/directory |sort -n -r |head -n 10
  • This doesn't answer the question which is asking about listing files in Powershell. There's no "head" command available. It would apply nicely to bash, but that's not the topic of this question. – Brian Sep 25 '18 at 15:44

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