19

I need to write a simple ping method in Cocoa/Objective-C. It also needs to work on the iPhone.

I found an example that uses icmp, will this work on the iPhone?

I'm leaning towards a solution using NSNetServices, is this a good idea?

The method only needs to ping a few times and return the average and -1 if the host is down or unreachable.

-7
+50

The code below seems to be working synchronously:

const char *hostName = [@"stackoverflow.com"
                        cStringUsingEncoding:NSASCIIStringEncoding];
SCNetworkConnectionFlags flags = 0;
if (SCNetworkCheckReachabilityByName(hostName, &flags) && flags > 0) {
  NSLog(@"Host is reachable: %d", flags);
}
else {
  NSLog(@"Host is unreachable");
}

Note: SystemConfiguration.framework is required

|improve this answer|||||
  • 3
    Unfortunately, SCNetworkCheckReachabilityByName is now deprecated. – William Remacle Oct 12 '10 at 10:30
  • 29
    8 votes and +bounty for code that totally doesn't do what question was about, i.e. ping/traceroute but it's a DNS lookup, basically. – bestsss Oct 26 '11 at 8:10
  • The code is not only deprecated but also looking up the DNS – Adromil Balais Aug 6 '15 at 6:45
  • 1
    “You cannot delete this accepted answer”. Sorry guys! 😃 – Vadim Aug 11 '15 at 13:33
  • SCNetworkReachability is a poor indicator of whether a host is online. On a LAN situation, reachability seems to always returns that the host is reachable whenever there is a WiFi connection although it's really an invalid host name. – adib Feb 14 '17 at 12:29
35

Let me try this again...this time logging in, and formatting better ;-)

StreamSCNetworkCheckReachabilityByName is deprecated and NOT available for the iPhone.

bool success = false;
const char *host_name = [@"stackoverflow.com" 
                         cStringUsingEncoding:NSASCIIStringEncoding];

SCNetworkReachabilityRef reachability = SCNetworkReachabilityCreateWithName(NULL,
                                                                        host_name);
SCNetworkReachabilityFlags flags;
success = SCNetworkReachabilityGetFlags(reachability, &flags);

//prevents memory leak per Carlos Guzman's comment
CFRelease(reachability);

bool isAvailable = success && (flags & kSCNetworkFlagsReachable) && 
                             !(flags & kSCNetworkFlagsConnectionRequired);
if (isAvailable) {
    NSLog(@"Host is reachable: %d", flags);
}else{
    NSLog(@"Host is unreachable");
}

Note: SystemConfiguration.framework is required

|improve this answer|||||
  • Hi. Excelent code and helpful, but only one thing. You require add the code CFRelease(reachability) after call SCNetworkReachabilityGetFlags to release reachability variable (to prevent memory leaks) as is mentioned in documentation – Carlos Guzman Oct 23 '16 at 14:47
  • 1
    SCNetworkReachabilityGetFlags is a poor substitute of ping – if the device is connected to a network, kSCNetworkFlagsReachable will be set and kSCNetworkFlagsConnectionRequired will be unset even though the target host is offline. – adib Feb 14 '17 at 13:45
  • I was improving on the accepted answer. I don't debate that SCNetworkReachabilityGetFlags is a poor substitute for 'ping', but if you are just trying to determine reachability, as was rjstelling objective, then this is a fine solution. If you need to monitor latency or provide a heartbeat, then a 'ping' solution is arguably better. – Gene Myers Feb 14 '17 at 13:51
32

I had this same problem, and ended up writing a simple wrapper around SimplePing to achieve this, wrote a blog about it and there's some code on github, hopefully will help someone here:

http://splinter.com.au/how-to-ping-a-server-in-objective-c-iphone

|improve this answer|||||
  • 14
    Upvote for a solution that actually answers the question (vs all this useless Reachability stuff which people seem to like but which is totally not addressing the question asked!). Thank you! – Bill Patterson Mar 22 '13 at 4:51
  • Yes, this is the actual answer. – user623396 Nov 10 '14 at 13:39
13

You are not missing anything -- "Reachability" doesn't actually test that the target domain is in fact reachable, it only assesses if there is a pathway out of the machine by which the target domain is potentially reachable. So long as you have some outbound connection (e.g., an active wirless or wired connection), and a routing configuration that leads to the target, then the site is "reachable" as far as SCNetworkReachability is concerned.

|improve this answer|||||
5

Pinging on the iPhone works a bit different than on other platforms, due to the fact that you don't have root access. See this sample code from Apple.

|improve this answer|||||
  • This file is removed from all around apple developer library. – AhmetB - Google Aug 3 '12 at 16:34
0

The answer Gene Myers posted works using "SCNetworkReachabilityCreateWithName" for me - but only in the simulator. On my device (iPod w/OS 2.2.1) it always returns "Host is reachable" even for nonsense addresses like "zzz".

Am I misunderstanding something? Thanks.

Here's my code just in case:

From How to write a simple Ping method in Cocoa/Objective-C

    - (IBAction) TestReachability:(id)sender
{
    bool success = false;
    const char *host_name = [ipAddressText.textcStringUsingEncoding:NSASCIIStringEncoding];
    NSString *imageConnectionSuccess = @"Connected.png";
    NSString *imageConnectionFailed = @"NotConnected.png";

    SCNetworkReachabilityRef reachability = SCNetworkReachabilityCreateWithName(NULL,
                                                                                host_name);
    SCNetworkReachabilityFlags flags;
    success = SCNetworkReachabilityGetFlags(reachability, &flags);
    bool isAvailable = success && (flags & kSCNetworkFlagsReachable) && 
        !(flags & kSCNetworkFlagsConnectionRequired);
    if (isAvailable)
    {
        NSLog([NSString stringWithFormat: @"'%s' is reachable, flags: %x", host_name, flags]);
        [imageView setImage: [UIImage imageNamed:imageConnectionSuccess]]; 
    }
    else
    {
        NSLog([NSString stringWithFormat: @"'%s' is not reachable", host_name]);
        [imageView setImage: [UIImage imageNamed:imageConnectionFailed]]; 
    }
}
|improve this answer|||||
-1

Please take note that there is an difference between the simulator and the actual iPhone. The simulator is not a true simulator like the one supplied by Android, it uses Mac OSX classes for most of the functions.

This is particularly hell if there is a difference between the Mac OSX and iPhonew(for example the keychain).

|improve this answer|||||

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.