201

I'm basically looking for a python version of Combination of List<List<int>>

Given a list of lists, I need a new list that gives all the possible combinations of items between the lists.

[[1,2,3],[4,5,6],[7,8,9,10]] -> [[1,4,7],[1,4,8],...,[3,6,10]]

The number of lists is unknown, so I need something that works for all cases. Bonus points for elegance!

361

you need itertools.product:

>>> import itertools
>>> a = [[1,2,3],[4,5,6],[7,8,9,10]]
>>> list(itertools.product(*a))
[(1, 4, 7), (1, 4, 8), (1, 4, 9), (1, 4, 10), (1, 5, 7), (1, 5, 8), (1, 5, 9), (1, 5, 10), (1, 6, 7), (1, 6, 8), (1, 6, 9), (1, 6, 10), (2, 4, 7), (2, 4, 8), (2, 4, 9), (2, 4, 10), (2, 5, 7), (2, 5, 8), (2, 5, 9), (2, 5, 10), (2, 6, 7), (2, 6, 8), (2, 6, 9), (2, 6, 10), (3, 4, 7), (3, 4, 8), (3, 4, 9), (3, 4, 10), (3, 5, 7), (3, 5, 8), (3, 5, 9), (3, 5, 10), (3, 6, 7), (3, 6, 8), (3, 6, 9), (3, 6, 10)]
  • 15
    Could someone explain the meaning of the asterisk in *a? – Serrano Feb 4 '13 at 20:20
  • 40
    *a means these are arguments being passed to the function or method. def fn(a,b,c): would respond to fn(*[1,2,3]) reference – mjallday Feb 12 '13 at 23:37
  • 1
    @mjallday, would it be possible to add also these combinations: (7,4,1),(8,4,1),(9,4,1),(10,4,1),(7,5,1),(8,5,1),(9,5,1),(10,5,1) etc? – Reman Feb 17 '16 at 15:19
  • 1
    @Reman, sure: itertools.product(*reversed(a)) – deeenes Jun 26 '16 at 12:09
23

The most elegant solution is to use itertools.product in python 2.6.

If you aren't using Python 2.6, the docs for itertools.product actually show an equivalent function to do the product the "manual" way:

def product(*args, **kwds):
    # product('ABCD', 'xy') --> Ax Ay Bx By Cx Cy Dx Dy
    # product(range(2), repeat=3) --> 000 001 010 011 100 101 110 111
    pools = map(tuple, args) * kwds.get('repeat', 1)
    result = [[]]
    for pool in pools:
        result = [x+[y] for x in result for y in pool]
    for prod in result:
        yield tuple(prod)
18
listOLists = [[1,2,3],[4,5,6],[7,8,9,10]]
for list in itertools.product(*listOLists):
  print list;

I hope you find that as elegant as I did when I first encountered it.

  • 4
    What's up with that semicolon? :) – Paolo Bergantino Apr 28 '09 at 18:29
  • 3
    Force of habit. I love how Python lets you put one semi-colon, just to help us ol' C/Java programmers. But it's clear ; is not really a statement terminator when you do something like print("foo");; which is perfectly legal in C or Java (albeit pointless) but banned in Python. – Matthew Flaschen Apr 28 '09 at 23:55
3

Numpy can do it:

 >>> import numpy
 >>> a = [[1,2,3],[4,5,6],[7,8,9,10]]
 >>> [list(x) for x in numpy.array(numpy.meshgrid(*a)).T.reshape(-1,len(a))]
[[ 1, 4, 7], [1, 5, 7], [1, 6, 7], ....]
  • Could someone explain this? – ashishv Dec 7 '17 at 13:53
3

Nothing wrong with straight up recursion for this task, and if you need a version that works with strings, this might fit your needs:

combinations = []

def combine(terms, accum):
    last = (len(terms) == 1)
    n = len(terms[0])
    for i in range(n):
        item = accum + terms[0][i]
        if last:
            combinations.append(item)
        else:
            combine(terms[1:], item)


>>> a = [['ab','cd','ef'],['12','34','56']]
>>> combine(a, '')
>>> print(combinations)
['ab12', 'ab34', 'ab56', 'cd12', 'cd34', 'cd56', 'ef12', 'ef34', 'ef56']
2

One can use base python for this. The code needs a function to flatten lists of lists:

def flatten(B):    # function needed for code below;
    A = []
    for i in B:
        if type(i) == list: A.extend(i)
        else: A.append(i)
    return A

Then one can run:

L = [[1,2,3],[4,5,6],[7,8,9,10]]

outlist =[]; templist =[[]]
for sublist in L:
    outlist = templist; templist = [[]]
    for sitem in sublist:
        for oitem in outlist:
            newitem = [oitem]
            if newitem == [[]]: newitem = [sitem]
            else: newitem = [newitem[0], sitem]
            templist.append(flatten(newitem))

outlist = list(filter(lambda x: len(x)==len(L), templist))  # remove some partial lists that also creep in;
print(outlist)

Output:

[[1, 4, 7], [2, 4, 7], [3, 4, 7], 
[1, 5, 7], [2, 5, 7], [3, 5, 7], 
[1, 6, 7], [2, 6, 7], [3, 6, 7], 
[1, 4, 8], [2, 4, 8], [3, 4, 8], 
[1, 5, 8], [2, 5, 8], [3, 5, 8], 
[1, 6, 8], [2, 6, 8], [3, 6, 8], 
[1, 4, 9], [2, 4, 9], [3, 4, 9], 
[1, 5, 9], [2, 5, 9], [3, 5, 9], 
[1, 6, 9], [2, 6, 9], [3, 6, 9], 
[1, 4, 10], [2, 4, 10], [3, 4, 10], 
[1, 5, 10], [2, 5, 10], [3, 5, 10], 
[1, 6, 10], [2, 6, 10], [3, 6, 10]]
0
from itertools import product 
list_vals = [['Brand Acronym:CBIQ', 'Brand Acronym :KMEFIC'],['Brand Country:DXB','Brand Country:BH']]
list(product(*list_vals))

Output:

[('Brand Acronym:CBIQ', 'Brand Country :DXB'),
('Brand Acronym:CBIQ', 'Brand Country:BH'),
('Brand Acronym :KMEFIC', 'Brand Country :DXB'),
('Brand Acronym :KMEFIC', 'Brand Country:BH')]

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