54

In C++, to print a number in hexadecimal you do this:

int num = 10;
std::cout << std::hex << num; // => 'a'

I know I can create a manipulator that just adds stuff to the stream like so:

std::ostream& windows_feed(std::ostream& out)
{
    out << "\r\n";
    return out;
}

std::cout << "Hello" << windows_feed; // => "Hello\r\n"

However, how can I create a manipulator that, like 'hex', modifies items to come on the stream? As a simple example, how would I create the plusone manipulator here?:

int num2 = 1;
std::cout << "1 + 1 = " << plusone << num2; // => "1 + 1 = 2"

// note that the value stored in num2 does not change, just its display above.
std::cout << num2; // => "1"
68

First, you have to store some state into each stream. You can do that with the function iword and an index you pass to it, given by xalloc:

inline int geti() { 
    static int i = ios_base::xalloc();
    return i;
}

ostream& add_one(ostream& os) { os.iword(geti()) = 1; return os; } 
ostream& add_none(ostream& os) { os.iword(geti()) = 0; return os; }

Having that in place, you can already retrieve some state in all streams. Now, you just have to hook into the respective output operation. Numeric output is done by a facet, because it potentially is locale dependent. So you can do

struct my_num_put : num_put<char> {
    iter_type 
    do_put(iter_type s, ios_base& f, char_type fill, long v) const { 
        return num_put<char>::do_put(s, f, fill, v + f.iword(geti())); 
    } 

    iter_type 
    do_put(iter_type s, ios_base& f, char_type fill, unsigned long v) const { 
        return num_put<char>::do_put(s, f, fill, v + f.iword(geti())); 
    } 
}; 

Now, you can test the stuff.

int main() {
    // outputs: 11121011
    cout.imbue(locale(locale(),new my_num_put));
    cout << add_one << 10 << 11 
         << add_none << 10 << 11;
}

If you want that only the next number is incremented, just set the word to 0 again after each call to do_put.

  • 2
    +1. This is the thorough, by-the-book (and as you can see, fairly complex) solution. But I wonder if it would not be simpler (and possibly clearer) to just create a function plusone() that takes one argument and returns the result? – j_random_hacker Apr 29 '09 at 3:58
  • 2
    very nice exposition! – anon Apr 29 '09 at 9:33
  • Thanks folks :) – Johannes Schaub - litb Sep 28 '09 at 14:33
  • When does the new my_num_put pointer get deleted? – Apollys Mar 15 at 1:34
13

I totally agree with Neil Butterworth on this one, however in the specific case you are using you could do this totally horrible hack. Do not do this in any production code. It has lots of bugs. For one thing it only works in your one-liner above, it does not change the state of the underlying stream.

class plusone_stream : public std::ostream
{
  public:
    std::ostream operator<<(int i)
    {
      _out << i+1;
      return *this;
    }
};

std::ostream& plusone(std::ostream& out)
{
    return plusone_stream(out);
}
  • You beat me to it :) – Benoît Apr 28 '09 at 20:39
2

It's not a direct answer to your question, but don't you think that using a plain old function is both simpler to implement and clearer to use than writing a full blown manipulator?

#include <sstream>

template<typename T>
std::string plusone(T const& t) {
    std::ostringstream oss;
    oss << (t + 1);
    return oss.str();
}

Usage:

cout << plusone(42);

By "clear to use", I mean that the user doesn't need to ask themselves, "Does it affect only the next item, or all subsequent items?" It's obvious from inspection that only the argument of the function is affected.

(For the plusone() example, you could simplify even further by just returning a T instead, but returning a std::string serves the general case.)

1

I created a simple solution for your test case without using <iomanip>. I can't promise that the same approach will work in real life.

The basic approach is that cout << plusone returns a temporary auxiliary object (PlusOnePlus), which in turn has the overloaded operator << that performs the addition.

I've tested it on Windows:

PlusOne plusone;
cout << plusone << 41

produces "42", as expected. Here's the code:

class PlusOnePlus {
public:
    PlusOnePlus(ostream& os) : m_os(os) {}
    // NOTE: This implementation relies on the default copy ctor,
    // assignment, etc.
private:
    friend ostream& operator << (PlusOnePlus& p, int n);
    ostream& m_os;
};

class PlusOne {
public:
    static void test(ostream& os);
};

PlusOnePlus operator << (ostream& os, const PlusOne p)
{
    return PlusOnePlus(os);
}

ostream& operator << (PlusOnePlus& p, int n)
{
    return p.m_os << n + 1;
}

void PlusOne::test(ostream& os)
{
    PlusOne plusone;
    os << plusone << 0 << endl;
    os << plusone << 41 << endl;
}

EDIT: Commented the code to point out that I'm relying on the default copy constructor (etc.) for PlusOnePlus. A robust implementation would probably define these

  • Clever, but note that the following will not work: "os << plusone; os << 41;" – j_random_hacker Apr 29 '09 at 4:02
  • I could argue that that's a feature :-) though admittedly it's inconsistent with the standard way that manipulators operate. – Dan Breslau Apr 29 '09 at 14:48
  • 1
    Yeah, I doubt anyone will notice one more more gratuitous inconsistency in C++... ;) +1. – j_random_hacker Apr 30 '09 at 13:44
1

You'll have to play with streamstates. I've bookmarked the following links on the subject:

As Maciej Sobczak library is no longer available online, and as the licence permits me to do so, (correct me if I'm wrong), here is a copy of its main file that I've managed to salvage from oblivion:

// streamstate.h
//
// Copyright (C) Maciej Sobczak, 2002, 2003
//
// Permission to copy, use, modify, sell and distribute this software is
// granted provided this copyright notice appears in all copies.  This software
// is provided "as is" without express or implied warranty, and with no claim
// as to its suitability for any purpose.
//
// <http://lists.boost.org/Archives/boost/2002/10/38275.php>
// <http://www.ddj.com/dept/cpp/184402062?pgno=1>
// <http://www.msobczak.com/prog/publications.html>

#ifndef STREAMSTATE_H_INCLUDED
#define STREAMSTATE_H_INCLUDED

#include <ios>
#include <istream>
#include <ostream>

// helper exception class, thrown when the source of error
// was in one of the functions managing the additional state storage
class StreamStateException : public std::ios_base::failure
{
public:
    explicit StreamStateException()
        : std::ios_base::failure(
            "Error while managing additional IOStream state.")
    {
    }
};

// State should be:
// default-constructible
// copy-constructible
// assignable

// note: the "void *" slot is used for storing the actual value
//       the "long" slot is used to propagate the error flag
template
<
    class State,
    class charT = char,
    class traits = std::char_traits<charT>
>
class streamstate
{
public:
    // construct with the default state value
    streamstate() {}

    // construct with the given stream value
    streamstate(const State &s) : state_(s) {}

    // modifies the stream
    std::basic_ios<charT, traits> &
    modify(std::basic_ios<charT, traits> &ios) const
    {
        long *errslot;
        void *&p = state_slot(ios, errslot);

        // propagate the error flag to the real stream state
        if (*errslot == std::ios_base::badbit)
        {
            ios.setstate(std::ios_base::badbit);
            *errslot = 0;
        }

        // here, do-nothing-in-case-of-error semantics
        if (ios.bad())
            return ios;

        if (p == NULL)
        {
            // copy existing state object if this is new slot
            p = new State(state_);
            ios.register_callback(state_callback, 0);
        }
        else
            *static_cast<State*>(p) = state_;

        return ios;
    }

    // gets the current (possibly default) state from the slot
    static State & get(std::basic_ios<charT, traits> &ios)
    {
        long *errslot;
        void *&p = state_slot(ios, errslot);

        // propagate the error flag to the real stream state
        if (*errslot == std::ios_base::badbit)
        {
            ios.setstate(std::ios_base::badbit);
            *errslot = 0;
        }

        // this function returns a reference and therefore
        // the only sensible error reporting is via exception
        if (ios.bad())
            throw StreamStateException();

        if (p == NULL)
        {
            // create default state if this is new slot
            p = new State;
            ios.register_callback(state_callback, 0);
        }

        return *static_cast<State*>(p);
    }

private:
    // manages the destruction and format copying
    // (in the latter case performs deep copy of the state)
    static void state_callback(std::ios_base::event e,
        std::ios_base &ios, int)
    {
        long *errslot;
        if (e == std::ios_base::erase_event)
        {
            // safe delete if state_slot fails
            delete static_cast<State*>(state_slot(ios, errslot));
        }
        else if (e == std::ios_base::copyfmt_event)
        {
            void *& p = state_slot(ios, errslot);
            State *old = static_cast<State*>(p);

            // Standard forbids any exceptions from callbacks
            try
            {
                // in-place deep copy
                p = new State(*old);
    }
            catch (...)
            {
                // clean the value slot and
                // set the error flag in the error slot
                p = NULL;
                *errslot = std::ios_base::badbit;
            }
        }
    }

    // returns the references to associated slot
    static void *& state_slot(std::ios_base &ios, long *&errslot)
    {
        static int index = std::ios_base::xalloc();
        void *&p = ios.pword(index);
        errslot = &(ios.iword(index));

        // note: if pword failed,
        // then p is a valid void *& initialized to 0
        // (27.4.2.5/5)

        return p;
    }

    State state_;
};

// partial specialization for iword functionality
template
<
    class charT,
    class traits
>
class streamstate<long, charT, traits>
{
public:
    // construct with the default state value
    streamstate() {}

    // construct with the given stream value
    streamstate(long s) : state_(s) {}

    // modifies the stream
    // the return value is not really useful,
    // it has to be downcasted to the expected stream type
    std::basic_ios<charT, traits> &
    modify(std::basic_ios<charT, traits> &ios) const
    {
        long &s = state_slot(ios);
        s = state_;

        return ios;
    }

    static long & get(std::basic_ios<charT, traits> &ios)
    {
        return state_slot(ios);
    }

private:
    static long & state_slot(std::basic_ios<charT, traits> &ios)
    {
        static int index = std::ios_base::xalloc();
        long &s = ios.iword(index);

        // this function returns a reference and we decide
        // to report errors via exceptions
        if (ios.bad())
            throw StreamStateException();

        return s;
    }

    long state_;
};

// convenience inserter for ostream classes
template
<
    class State,
    class charT,
    class traits
>
std::basic_ostream<charT, traits> &
operator<<(std::basic_ostream<charT, traits> &os,
    const streamstate<State> &s)
{
    s.modify(os);
    return os;
}

// convenience extractor for istream classes
template
<
    class State,
    class charT,
    class traits
>
std::basic_istream<charT, traits> &
operator>>(std::basic_istream<charT, traits> &is,
    const streamstate<State> &s)
{
    s.modify(is);
    return is;
}

// the alternative if there is a need to have
// many different state values of the same type
// here, the instance of streamstate_value encapsulates
// the access information (the slot index)

template
<
    class State,
    class charT = char,
    class traits = std::char_traits<char>
>
class streamstate_value
{
public:

    streamstate_value()
        : index_(-1)
    {
    }

    // returns a reference to current (possibly default) state
    State & get(std::basic_ios<charT, traits> &ios)
    {
        long *errslot;
        void *&p = state_slot(ios, errslot, index_);

        // propagate the error flag to the real stream state
        if (*errslot == std::ios_base::badbit)
        {
            ios.setstate(std::ios_base::badbit);
            *errslot = 0;
        }

        // this function returns a reference and the only
        // sensible way of error reporting is via exception
        if (ios.bad())
            throw StreamStateException();

        if (p == NULL)
        {
            // create default state if this is new slot
            p = new State;
            ios.register_callback(state_callback, index_);
        }

        return *static_cast<State*>(p);
    }

private:

    // manages the destruction and format copying
    // (in the latter case performs deep copy of the state)
    static void state_callback(std::ios_base::event e,
        std::ios_base &ios, int index)
    {
        long *errslot;
        if (e == std::ios_base::erase_event)
        {
            // safe delete if state_slot fails
            delete static_cast<State*>(state_slot(ios, errslot, index));
        }
        else if (e == std::ios_base::copyfmt_event)
        {
            void *& p = state_slot(ios, errslot, index);
            State *old = static_cast<State*>(p);

            // Standard forbids any exceptions from callbacks
            try
            {
                // in-place deep copy
                p = new State(*old);
    }
            catch (...)
            {
                // clean the value slot and set the error flag
                // in the error slot
                p = NULL;
                *errslot = std::ios_base::badbit;
            }
        }
    }

    // returns the references to associated slot
    static void *& state_slot(std::ios_base &ios,
        long *& errslot, int & index)
    {
        if (index < 0)
        {
            // first index usage
            index = std::ios_base::xalloc();
        }

        void *&p = ios.pword(index);
        errslot = &(ios.iword(index));

        // note: if pword failed,
        // then p is a valid void *& initialized to 0
        // (27.4.2.5/5)

        return p;
    }

    int index_;
};

// partial specialization for iword functionality
template
<
    class charT,
    class traits
>
class streamstate_value<long, charT, traits>
{
public:
    // construct with the default state value
    streamstate_value()
        : index_(-1)
    {
    }

    long & get(std::basic_ios<charT, traits> &ios)
    {
        if (index_ < 0)
        {
            // first index usage
            index_ = std::ios_base::xalloc();
        }

        long &s = ios.iword(index_);
        if (ios.bad())
            throw StreamStateException();

        return s;
    }

private:
    long index_;
};

#endif // STREAMSTATE_H_INCLUDED 
  • Library link is dead. – Ben Fulton Mar 1 '17 at 14:41
  • @BenFulton. Indeed. Unfortunately the library doesn't seem available anymore. IIRC, I have a copy of the zip somewhere. And here it is. It may be better to fall back to boost nowadays though. – Luc Hermitte Mar 1 '17 at 15:15
0

litb's approach is "the right way" and necessary for complicated stuff, but something like this can be good enough. Add privacy and friendship to taste.

struct PlusOne
{
   PlusOne(int i) : i_(i) { }
   int i_;
};

std::ostream &
operator<<(std::ostream &o, const PlusOne &po)
{
   return o << (po.i_ + 1);
}

std::cout << "1 + 1 = " << PlusOne(num2); // => "1 + 1 = 2"

In this simple example creating and streaming a temporary object doesn't seem much more helpful than defining a function plusOne() as someone already suggested. But suppose you wanted it to work like this:

std::ostream &
operator<<(std::ostream &o, const PlusOne &po)
{
   return o << po.i_ << " + 1 = " << (po.i_ + 1);
}

std::cout << PlusOne(num2); // => "1 + 1 = 2"
-1

The hex, dec and oct manipulators simply change the basefield property of the existing stream.

See C++ Reference for more deatail about these manipulators.

As posted in Neil Butterworth's answer, you would need to extend the existing stream classes, or create your own, in order to have manipulators that affect future values inserted into the stream.

In the example of your plusone manipulator, the stream object would have to have an internal flag to indicate that one should be added to all inserted values. The plusone manipulator would simply set that flag, and the code to handle stream insertion would check that flag before inserting numbers.

  • 1
    Have to -1 sorry -- iostreams do contain an extensibility mechanism (xalloc(), iword(), pword()) as pointed out by litb. – j_random_hacker Apr 29 '09 at 4:01
  • 2
    No need to apologize. I was clearly wrong, and I wouldn't have known without seeing the -1. Thank you for bringing it to my attention! – e.James Apr 29 '09 at 14:00

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