86

I need to test whether each number from 1 to 1000 is a multiple of 3 or a multiple of 5. The way I thought I'd do this would be to divide the number by 3, and if the result is an integer then it would be a multiple of 3. Same with 5.

How do I test whether the number is an integer?

here is my current code:

n = 0
s = 0

while (n < 1001):
    x = n/3
    if isinstance(x, (int, long)):
        print 'Multiple of 3!'
        s = s + n
    if False:
        y = n/5
        if isinstance(y, (int, long)):
            s = s + n

    print 'Number: '
    print n
    print 'Sum:'
    print s
    n = n + 1
  • 1
    In Python 2.x, integer division always yields an integer. – Russell Borogove Nov 3 '11 at 22:19
  • 13
    You should be printing "Fizz" and "Buzz" – wim Nov 3 '11 at 23:21
  • 9
    Project Euler Problem 1 ? – Ashutosh Dave Jan 30 '13 at 13:56
186

You do this using the modulus operator, %

n % k == 0

evaluates true if and only if n is an exact multiple of k. In elementary maths this is known as the remainder from a division.

In your current approach you perform a division and the result will be either

  • always an integer if you use integer division, or
  • always a float if you use floating point division.

It's just the wrong way to go about testing divisibility.

  • 1
    @Taimur answered updated – David Heffernan Nov 3 '11 at 21:40
  • 2
    not(n % k) would be a less readable alternative – Chris_Rands Dec 8 '16 at 12:46
  • 0 % 5 == 0 would be True as well, but zero is not exact multiple of zero. – Fusion Aug 9 '17 at 12:41
  • @Fusion 0 == 0*5 – David Heffernan Feb 20 '18 at 23:37
  • @Chris_Rands Put that into an answer, people who do code-golf (like me) would be very happy. In fact, I came here looking for a golfed answer like that. – MilkyWay90 Nov 11 '18 at 22:29
3

You can simply use % Modulus operator to check divisibility.
For example: n % 2 == 0 means n is exactly divisible by 2 and n % 2 != 0 means n is not exactly divisible by 2.

1

I had the same approach. Because I didn't understand how to use the module(%) operator.

6 % 3 = 0 *This means if you divide 6 by 3 you will not have a remainder, 3 is a factor of 6.

Now you have to relate it to your given problem.

if n % 3 == 0 *This is saying, if my number(n) is divisible by 3 leaving a 0 remainder.

Add your then(print, return) statement and continue your

0

You can use % operator to check divisiblity of a given number

The code to check whether given no. is divisible by 3 or 5 when no. less than 1000 is given below:

n=0
while n<1000:
    if n%3==0 or n%5==0:
        print n,'is multiple of 3 or 5'
    n=n+1
0

This code appears to do what you are asking for.

for value in range(1,1000):
    if value % 3 == 0 or value % 5 == 0:
        print(value)

Or something like

for value in range(1,1000):
    if value % 3 == 0 or value % 5 == 0:
        some_list.append(value)

Or any number of things.

  • to answer your question: select and ctrl+K indents. I've done that for you for this time. – Jean-François Fabre Jan 4 '17 at 21:17
-3

For small numbers n%3 == 0 will be fine. For very large numbers I propose to calculate the cross sum first and then check if the cross sum is a multiple of 3:

def is_divisible_by_3(number):
    if sum(map(int, str(number))) % 3 != 0:
        my_bool = False
    return my_bool
  • 1
    Is calculating the cross sum and using the modulus operation really faster than directly using the modulus operation? If so, shouldn't you call your function recursively until the number is "small" enough? – honk Aug 9 '14 at 6:43
-6

jinja2 template fizzbuz:

<form>
  <ol>
    {% for x in range(1,n+1) %}
      {% set fizzbuzz_rpm = x %}
      {% if x % 3 == 0 and x % 5 == 0 %}
        {% set fizzbuzz_rpm="FizzBuzz" %}
      {% elif x % 3 == 0 %}
          {% set fizzbuzz_rpm="Fizz" %}
      {% elif x %5 == 0 %}
          {% set fizzbuzz_rpm="Buzz" %}
      {% endif %}
      <li>{{fizzbuzz_rpm}}</li>
    {% endfor %}
  </ol>
</form>
  • 4
    A solution in Python was asked for. – jmd_dk Jan 5 '17 at 17:09
  • Your answer is not relevant to the question – Varadaraju G Jul 22 at 10:21
-6

The simplest way is to test whether a number is an integer is int(x) == x. Otherwise, what David Heffernan said.

-7

Try this ...

public class Solution {

  public static void main(String[] args) {
    long t = 1000;
    long sum = 0;

    for(int i = 1; i<t; i++){
            if(i%3 == 0 || i%5 == 0){
                sum = sum + i;
            }
        }
        System.out.println(sum);    
  }
}
  • This is for who wiling to code java – Asanka Dhananjaya Dec 30 '16 at 9:55
  • I doubt Java is Python, so this isn't a valid answer – MilkyWay90 Nov 11 '18 at 22:28
  • Your answer is not relevant to the question – Varadaraju G Jul 22 at 10:20

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