240

I love tuples. They allow you to quickly group relevant information together without having to write a struct or class for it. This is very useful while refactoring very localized code.

Initializing a list of them however seems a bit redundant.

var tupleList = new List<Tuple<int, string>>
{
    Tuple.Create( 1, "cow" ),
    Tuple.Create( 5, "chickens" ),
    Tuple.Create( 1, "airplane" )
};

Isn't there a better way? I would love a solution along the lines of the Dictionary initializer.

Dictionary<int, string> students = new Dictionary<int, string>()
{
    { 111, "bleh" },
    { 112, "bloeh" },
    { 113, "blah" }
};

Can't we use a similar syntax?

  • 2
    In this case why wouldn't you use a dictionary instead of a list of Tuples? – Ed S. Nov 3 '11 at 22:03
  • 16
    @Ed S.: A Dictionary doesn't allow duplicate keys. – Steven Jeuris Nov 3 '11 at 22:04
  • 2
    @EdS.: Every time it's not a two-tuple where one item is hashable/orderable and unique. – user395760 Nov 3 '11 at 22:04
  • Good point, didn't notice the duplicate key. – Ed S. Nov 3 '11 at 22:06
189

c# 7.0 lets you do this:

  var tupleList = new List<(int, string)>
  {
      (1, "cow"),
      (5, "chickens"),
      (1, "airplane")
  };

If you don't need a List, but just an array, you can do:

  var tupleList = new(int, string)[]
  {
      (1, "cow"),
      (5, "chickens"),
      (1, "airplane")
  };

And if you don't like "Item1" and "Item2", you can do:

  var tupleList = new List<(int Index, string Name)>
  {
      (1, "cow"),
      (5, "chickens"),
      (1, "airplane")
  };

or

  var tupleList = new (int Index, string Name)[]
  {
      (1, "cow"),
      (5, "chickens"),
      (1, "airplane")
  };

which lets you do: tupleList[0].Index and tupleList[0].Name

Framework 4.6.2 and below

You must install System.ValueTuple from the Nuget Package Manager.

Framework 4.7 and above

It is built into the framework. Do not install System.ValueTuple. In fact, remove it and delete it from the bin directory.

note: In real life, I wouldn't be able to choose between cow, chickens or airplane. I would be really torn.

  • 1
    Can this be used on a .net core 2.0 ? – Алекса Јевтић Apr 5 '18 at 9:25
  • 2
    @АлексаЈевтић, System.ValueTuple supports core 2.0. But, try it without the Nuget first, as unnecessary packages can cause problems. So one way or another, yes. Use c# v7 or greater if possible. – toddmo Apr 5 '18 at 15:26
218

Yes! This is possible.

The { } syntax of the collection initializer works on any IEnumerable type which has an Add method with the correct amount of arguments. Without bothering how that works under the covers, that means you can simply extend from List<T>, add a custom Add method to initialize your T, and you are done!

public class TupleList<T1, T2> : List<Tuple<T1, T2>>
{
    public void Add( T1 item, T2 item2 )
    {
        Add( new Tuple<T1, T2>( item, item2 ) );
    }
}

This allows you to do the following:

var groceryList = new TupleList<int, string>
{
    { 1, "kiwi" },
    { 5, "apples" },
    { 3, "potatoes" },
    { 1, "tomato" }
};
81

C# 6 adds a new feature just for this: extension Add methods. This has always been possible for VB.net but is now available in C#.

Now you don't have to add Add() methods to your classes directly, you can implement them as extension methods. When extending any enumerable type with an Add() method, you'll be able to use it in collection initializer expressions. So you don't have to derive from lists explicitly anymore (as mentioned in another answer), you can simply extend it.

public static class TupleListExtensions
{
    public static void Add<T1, T2>(this IList<Tuple<T1, T2>> list,
            T1 item1, T2 item2)
    {
        list.Add(Tuple.Create(item1, item2));
    }

    public static void Add<T1, T2, T3>(this IList<Tuple<T1, T2, T3>> list,
            T1 item1, T2 item2, T3 item3)
    {
        list.Add(Tuple.Create(item1, item2, item3));
    }

    // and so on...
}

This will allow you to do this on any class that implements IList<>:

var numbers = new List<Tuple<int, string>>
{
    { 1, "one" },
    { 2, "two" },
    { 3, "three" },
    { 4, "four" },
    { 5, "five" },
};
var points = new ObservableCollection<Tuple<double, double, double>>
{
    { 0, 0, 0 },
    { 1, 2, 3 },
    { -4, -2, 42 },
};

Of course you're not restricted to extending collections of tuples, it can be for collections of any specific type you want the special syntax for.

public static class BigIntegerListExtensions
{
    public static void Add(this IList<BigInteger> list,
        params byte[] value)
    {
        list.Add(new BigInteger(value));
    }

    public static void Add(this IList<BigInteger> list,
        string value)
    {
        list.Add(BigInteger.Parse(value));
    }
}

var bigNumbers = new List<BigInteger>
{
    new BigInteger(1), // constructor BigInteger(int)
    2222222222L,       // implicit operator BigInteger(long)
    3333333333UL,      // implicit operator BigInteger(ulong)
    { 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4 },               // extension Add(byte[])
    "55555555555555555555555555555555555555", // extension Add(string)
};

C# 7 will be adding in support for tuples built into the language, though they will be of a different type (System.ValueTuple instead). So to it would be good to add overloads for value tuples so you have the option to use them as well. Unfortunately, there are no implicit conversions defined between the two.

public static class ValueTupleListExtensions
{
    public static void Add<T1, T2>(this IList<Tuple<T1, T2>> list,
        ValueTuple<T1, T2> item) => list.Add(item.ToTuple());
}

This way the list initialization will look even nicer.

var points = new List<Tuple<int, int, int>>
{
    (0, 0, 0),
    (1, 2, 3),
    (-1, 12, -73),
};

But instead of going through all this trouble, it might just be better to switch to using ValueTuple exclusively.

var points = new List<(int, int, int)>
{
    (0, 0, 0),
    (1, 2, 3),
    (-1, 12, -73),
};
  • I finally took a decent look at this while updating my library to C# 6.0. Although it looks good at a glance, I prefer my previously posted solution over this because I find TupleList<int, string>. to be more readable than List<Tuple<int, string>>. – Steven Jeuris Oct 28 '16 at 12:56
  • 1
    That's something that a type alias can fix. Granted the alias itself cannot be generic which may be preferable. using TupleList = System.Collections.Generic.List<System.Tuple<int, string>>; – Jeff Mercado Oct 28 '16 at 13:54
  • I created a Nuget Package with Add methods on ICollection to save others the time of having to maintain this code. See here for package: nuget.org/packages/Naos.Recipes.TupleInitializers See here for code: github.com/NaosProject/Naos.Recipes/blob/master/… This will include a cs file in your solution under a ".Naos.Recipes" folder, so you don't have to drag-around an assembly dependency – SFun28 Dec 5 '16 at 16:00
42

You can do this by calling the constructor each time with is slightly better

var tupleList = new List<Tuple<int, string>>
{
    new Tuple<int, string>(1, "cow" ),
    new Tuple<int, string>( 5, "chickens" ),
    new Tuple<int, string>( 1, "airplane" )
};
  • 6
    I couldn't get the original code to work, so I've amended it to what I think it should be... which may reverse your opinion on whether the syntax "is slightly better" after all :) – onedaywhen Jan 11 '13 at 16:05
  • 5
    at least use Tuple.Create instead and you can infer the type arguments – Dave Cousineau Feb 19 '16 at 19:38
28

Old question, but this is what I typically do to make things a bit more readable:

Func<int, string, Tuple<int, string>> tc = Tuple.Create;

var tupleList = new List<Tuple<int, string>>
{
    tc( 1, "cow" ),
    tc( 5, "chickens" ),
    tc( 1, "airplane" )
};
  • Works on old versions of .NET, too! – Ed Bayiates Aug 1 '18 at 21:41
1

Super Duper Old I know but I would add my piece on using Linq and continuation lambdas on methods with using C# 7. I try to use named tuples as replacements for DTOs and anonymous projections when reused in a class. Yes for mocking and testing you still need classes but doing things inline and passing around in a class is nice to have this newer option IMHO. You can instantiate them from

  1. Direct Instantiation
var items = new List<(int Id, string Name)> { (1, "Me"), (2, "You")};
  1. Off of an existing collection, and now you can return well typed tuples similar to how anonymous projections used to be done.
public class Hold
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
}

//In some method or main console app:
var holds = new List<Hold> { new Hold { Id = 1, Name = "Me" }, new Hold { Id = 2, Name = "You" } };
var anonymousProjections = holds.Select(x => new { SomeNewId = x.Id, SomeNewName = x.Name });
var namedTuples = holds.Select(x => (TupleId: x.Id, TupleName: x.Name));
  1. Reuse the tuples later with grouping methods or use a method to construct them inline in other logic:
//Assuming holder class above making 'holds' object
public (int Id, string Name) ReturnNamedTuple(int id, string name) => (id, name);
public static List<(int Id, string Name)> ReturnNamedTuplesFromHolder(List<Hold> holds) => holds.Select(x => (x.Id, x.Name)).ToList();
public static void DoSomethingWithNamedTuplesInput(List<(int id, string name)> inputs) => inputs.ForEach(x => Console.WriteLine($"Doing work with {x.id} for {x.name}"));

var namedTuples2 = holds.Select(x => ReturnNamedTuple(x.Id, x.Name));
var namedTuples3 = ReturnNamedTuplesFromHolder(holds);
DoSomethingWithNamedTuplesInput(namedTuples.ToList());
  • You make me feel old. :) I might be missing something here, but initializing 'holds' is not concise at all. This was the exact point of the question. – Steven Jeuris Dec 6 '18 at 17:39
  • @Steven Jeuris No, you were right I copied and pasted the wrong bit of code for Point 1. Need to go a little slower before I hit 'submit'. – djangojazz Dec 6 '18 at 17:42
0

One technique I think is a little easier and that hasn't been mentioned before here:

var asdf = new [] { 
    (Age: 1, Name: "cow"), 
    (Age: 2, Name: "bird")
}.ToList();

I think that's a little cleaner than:

var asdf = new List<Tuple<int, string>> { 
    (Age: 1, Name: "cow"), 
    (Age: 2, Name: "bird")
};
  • That comes more down to taste whether you prefer to mention types explicitly or not, in the same vain as to use var or not. I personally prefer explicit typing (when it is not duplicated in e.g. the constructor). – Steven Jeuris Jan 24 '18 at 12:20
-1

Why do like tuples? It's like anonymous types: no names. Can not understand structure of data.

I like classic classes

class FoodItem
{
     public int Position { get; set; }
     public string Name { get; set; }
}

List<FoodItem> list = new List<FoodItem>
{
     new FoodItem { Position = 1, Name = "apple" },
     new FoodItem { Position = 2, Name = "kiwi" }
};
  • 3
    As I stated: "They allow you to quickly group relevant information together without having to write a struct or class for it." In case this class would solely be used within a single method as a helper data structure, I prefer to use Tuples, so not to populate a namespace with an unnecessary class. – Steven Jeuris Mar 3 '17 at 15:55
  • 1
    You're thinking of the older Tuple class (not struct). C#7 added struct-based tuples (backed by the new ValueTuple type) that CAN have names, so you can understand the structure of data – Steve Niles May 5 '17 at 17:34
-5
    var colors = new[]
    {
        new { value = Color.White, name = "White" },
        new { value = Color.Silver, name = "Silver" },
        new { value = Color.Gray, name = "Gray" },
        new { value = Color.Black, name = "Black" },
        new { value = Color.Red, name = "Red" },
        new { value = Color.Maroon, name = "Maroon" },
        new { value = Color.Yellow, name = "Yellow" },
        new { value = Color.Olive, name = "Olive" },
        new { value = Color.Lime, name = "Lime" },
        new { value = Color.Green, name = "Green" },
        new { value = Color.Aqua, name = "Aqua" },
        new { value = Color.Teal, name = "Teal" },
        new { value = Color.Blue, name = "Blue" },
        new { value = Color.Navy, name = "Navy" },
        new { value = Color.Pink, name = "Pink" },
        new { value = Color.Fuchsia, name = "Fuchsia" },
        new { value = Color.Purple, name = "Purple" }
    };
    foreach (var color in colors)
    {
        stackLayout.Children.Add(
            new Label
            {
                Text = color.name,
                TextColor = color.value,
            });
        FontSize = Device.GetNamedSize(NamedSize.Large, typeof(Label))
    }

this is a Tuple<Color, string>
  • How do you get the value/name syntax with a Tuple? – Andreas Reiff Oct 14 '15 at 9:06
  • Compiler tells that anonymous type are not implicitly convertible to Tuple – cthepenier Nov 23 '15 at 15:38
  • damn, I was looking exactly for this! Thank you – Arjang Aug 14 '18 at 15:59

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