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Using R, how can I write the following logic into the dataframe: IF column A = B and Column E = 0, delete row

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298

Logic index:

d<-d[!(d$A=="B" & d$E==0),]
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    I tried so many complicated answers -- none worked. Your solution is simple and brilliant. – WGray Aug 6 '15 at 20:49
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    Actually, a simpler way of viewing it is: foo.isolated <- subset(foo, !(sid == "sid104" & game.num == 7)) – WGray Aug 6 '15 at 21:01
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    Why are NA's still included – Jørgen K. Kanters Dec 3 '16 at 13:13
  • NA's killed my two hours :D Note that it will also select NA's – Ioane Sharvadze Feb 24 '17 at 20:18
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Subset is your safest and easiest answer.

subset(dataframe, A==B & E!=0)

Real data example with mtcars

subset(mtcars, cyl==6 & am!=0)
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    a good second example would be to filter on a list of values. ie subset of mtcars for cyl not in c(100, 200, 500) – airstrike Nov 9 '15 at 4:16
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Use the which function:

A <- c('a','a','b','b','b')
B <- c(1,0,1,1,0)
d <- data.frame(A, B)

r <- with(d, which(B==0, arr.ind=TRUE))
newd <- d[-r, ]
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    -1. Don't use which for this. Change the condition to B==2 and see if it gives the answer that you want. See, e.g., rwiki.sciviews.org/… – Richie Cotton Nov 4 '11 at 10:47
  • Why not to use which from Advanced R: "there are two important differences. First, when the logical vector contains NA, logical subsetting replaces these values by NA while which() drops these values. Second, x[-which(y)] is not equivalent to x[!y]: if y is all FALSE, which(y) will be integer(0) and -integer(0) is still integer(0), so you’ll get no values, instead of all values. In general, avoid switching from logical to integer subsetting unless you want, for example, the first or last TRUE value." – filups21 Sep 30 '19 at 14:17

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