These days we can drag & drop files into a special container and upload them with XHR 2. Many at a time. With live progress bars etc. Very cool stuff. Example here.

But sometimes we don't want that much coolness. What I'd like is to drag & drop files -- many at a time -- into a standard HTML file input: <input type=file multiple>.

Is that possible? Is there some way to 'fill' the file input with the right filenames (?) from the file drop? (Full filepaths aren't available for file system security reasons.)

Why? Because I'd like to submit a normal form. For all browsers and all devices. The drag & drop is just progressive enhancement to enhance & simplify UX. The standard form with standard file input (+ multiple attribute) will be there. I'd like to add the HTML5 enhancement.

edit
I know in some browsers you can sometimes (almost always) drop files into the file input itself. I know Chrome usually does this, but sometimes it fails and then loads the file in the current page (a big fail if you're filling out a form). I want to fool- & browserproof it.

  • 1
    Prepare for some pain if you want to include mac/safari in your compatibilities. – Shark8 Nov 10 '11 at 19:37
  • 1
    @Shark8 actually Safari/Mac is one of the few browsers already supporting this. – Ricardo Tomasi Nov 14 '11 at 7:28
  • Actually, none of the browsers support this. The file input field is read-only (for security) and that's the problem. Stupid security! – Rudie Nov 15 '11 at 13:21
  • 1
    By this i meant "drag & drop files -- many at a time -- into a standard HTML file input". – Ricardo Tomasi Nov 15 '11 at 22:01
  • 3
    drag/drop multiple files to input type="file" multiple works fine in Safari – Lloyd Nov 28 '11 at 12:03

11 Answers 11

up vote 37 down vote accepted

I made a solution for this.

$(function () {
    var dropZoneId = "drop-zone";
    var buttonId = "clickHere";
    var mouseOverClass = "mouse-over";

    var dropZone = $("#" + dropZoneId);
    var ooleft = dropZone.offset().left;
    var ooright = dropZone.outerWidth() + ooleft;
    var ootop = dropZone.offset().top;
    var oobottom = dropZone.outerHeight() + ootop;
    var inputFile = dropZone.find("input");
    document.getElementById(dropZoneId).addEventListener("dragover", function (e) {
        e.preventDefault();
        e.stopPropagation();
        dropZone.addClass(mouseOverClass);
        var x = e.pageX;
        var y = e.pageY;

        if (!(x < ooleft || x > ooright || y < ootop || y > oobottom)) {
            inputFile.offset({ top: y - 15, left: x - 100 });
        } else {
            inputFile.offset({ top: -400, left: -400 });
        }

    }, true);

    if (buttonId != "") {
        var clickZone = $("#" + buttonId);

        var oleft = clickZone.offset().left;
        var oright = clickZone.outerWidth() + oleft;
        var otop = clickZone.offset().top;
        var obottom = clickZone.outerHeight() + otop;

        $("#" + buttonId).mousemove(function (e) {
            var x = e.pageX;
            var y = e.pageY;
            if (!(x < oleft || x > oright || y < otop || y > obottom)) {
                inputFile.offset({ top: y - 15, left: x - 160 });
            } else {
                inputFile.offset({ top: -400, left: -400 });
            }
        });
    }

    document.getElementById(dropZoneId).addEventListener("drop", function (e) {
        $("#" + dropZoneId).removeClass(mouseOverClass);
    }, true);

})
#drop-zone {
    /*Sort of important*/
    width: 300px;
    /*Sort of important*/
    height: 200px;
    position:absolute;
    left:50%;
    top:100px;
    margin-left:-150px;
    border: 2px dashed rgba(0,0,0,.3);
    border-radius: 20px;
    font-family: Arial;
    text-align: center;
    position: relative;
    line-height: 180px;
    font-size: 20px;
    color: rgba(0,0,0,.3);
}

    #drop-zone input {
        /*Important*/
        position: absolute;
        /*Important*/
        cursor: pointer;
        left: 0px;
        top: 0px;
        /*Important This is only comment out for demonstration purposes.
        opacity:0; */
    }

    /*Important*/
    #drop-zone.mouse-over {
        border: 2px dashed rgba(0,0,0,.5);
        color: rgba(0,0,0,.5);
    }


/*If you dont want the button*/
#clickHere {
    position: absolute;
    cursor: pointer;
    left: 50%;
    top: 50%;
    margin-left: -50px;
    margin-top: 20px;
    line-height: 26px;
    color: white;
    font-size: 12px;
    width: 100px;
    height: 26px;
    border-radius: 4px;
    background-color: #3b85c3;

}

    #clickHere:hover {
        background-color: #4499DD;

    }
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.11.1/jquery.min.js"></script>
<div id="drop-zone">
    Drop files here...
    <div id="clickHere">
        or click here..
        <input type="file" name="file" id="file" />
    </div>
</div>

The Drag and Drop functionality for this method only works with Chrome, Firefox and Safari. (Don't know if it works with IE10), but for other browsers, the "Or click here" button works fine.

The input field simply follow your mouse when dragging a file over an area, and I've added a button as well..

Uncomment opacity:0; the file input is only visible so you can see what's going on.

  • That's why i added a button aswell^^ But yah your'e right. I wouln't use it eather... Or would i !? – BjarkeCK Oct 3 '12 at 18:23
  • I wish I knew how that is supposed to work... it seems all the drag/drop functions have to deal with adding the hover effect... but I really can't tell. Looks good in the fiddle, but I don't think I can use it since I need to support Internet Explorer – nmz787 Apr 2 '15 at 0:13
  • @nmz787 checkout this thread, you might find another solution there. stackoverflow.com/questions/1537223/… – BjarkeCK Apr 2 '15 at 1:10
  • 1
    @PiotrKowalski I think that would potentially trigger a recursive call until the call stack overflows – John Sep 28 '16 at 12:08
  • 2
    I ended up using the style only. Making the input 100% width and height worked better than moving it around. – Eddie Mar 28 '17 at 4:35

The following works in Chrome and FF, but i've yet to find a solution that covers IE10+ as well:

// dragover and dragenter events need to have 'preventDefault' called
// in order for the 'drop' event to register. 
// See: https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/Guide/HTML/Drag_operations#droptargets
dropContainer.ondragover = dropContainer.ondragenter = function(evt) {
  evt.preventDefault();
};

dropContainer.ondrop = function(evt) {
  // pretty simple -- but not for IE :(
  fileInput.files = evt.dataTransfer.files;
  evt.preventDefault();
};
<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<body>
<div id="dropContainer" style="border:1px solid black;height:100px;">
   Drop Here
</div>
  Should update here:
  <input type="file" id="fileInput" />
</body>
</html>

You'll probably want to use addEventListener or jQuery (etc.) to register your evt handlers - this is just for brevity's sake.

  • 1
    Waaaaaaaat! That works!? That's exactly what I was looking for. Didn't work 2 years ago. Awesome! Of course it doesn't work in IE =) The important question: is there reliable feature detection?, so you can hide the dropzone in IE, bc it won't work. – Rudie Aug 17 '16 at 9:57
  • D'oh, a bit late then :) Right now im just using simple user agent checks in JS. Of course you have to test for MSIE , Trident/ (IE11) and Edge/ (IE12)... – jlb Aug 17 '16 at 12:56
  • FF 48.0.2 (Mac) throws "TypeError: setting a property that has only a getter" at line fileInput.files = evt.dataTransfer.files;. Safari and Chrome however both work fine. – Risadinha Oct 26 '16 at 10:40
  • 1
    This example doesn't work on firefox 45 on linux, but it works for me on chrome. I don't get any console errors, it simply doesn't show that any file was dropped. – Bryan Oakley Feb 1 '17 at 15:19
  • 1
    actually I made a post to try and find a solution but figured out for myself. Pretty simple change, just fileInputs[index] = ... to pass the file data to a particular input and then call a function showNext to add a new input stackoverflow.com/a/43397640/6392779 – nick Apr 13 '17 at 16:46

This is the "DTHML" HTML5 way to do it. Normal form input (which IS read only as Ricardo Tomasi pointed out). Then if a file is dragged in, it is attached to the form. This WILL require modification to the action page to accept the file uploaded this way.

function readfiles(files) {
  for (var i = 0; i < files.length; i++) {
    document.getElementById('fileDragName').value = files[i].name
    document.getElementById('fileDragSize').value = files[i].size
    document.getElementById('fileDragType').value = files[i].type
    reader = new FileReader();
    reader.onload = function(event) {
      document.getElementById('fileDragData').value = event.target.result;}
    reader.readAsDataURL(files[i]);
  }
}
var holder = document.getElementById('holder');
holder.ondragover = function () { this.className = 'hover'; return false; };
holder.ondragend = function () { this.className = ''; return false; };
holder.ondrop = function (e) {
  this.className = '';
  e.preventDefault();
  readfiles(e.dataTransfer.files);
}
#holder.hover { border: 10px dashed #0c0 !important; }
<form method="post" action="http://example.com/">
  <input type="file"><input id="fileDragName"><input id="fileDragSize"><input id="fileDragType"><input id="fileDragData">
  <div id="holder" style="width:200px; height:200px; border: 10px dashed #ccc"></div>
</form>

It is even more boss if you can make the whole window a drop zone, see How do I detect a HTML5 drag event entering and leaving the window, like Gmail does?

  • 1
    Good solution yet it does not work on IE < 10 because IE 9 and less does not support HTML5 files API :( – Develoger Dec 8 '13 at 2:04
  • This doesn't make a real file upload... – Rudie Nov 20 '15 at 12:26
  • 1
    This line: document.getElementById('fileDragData').value = files[i].slice(); is not needed, because it is superseded in the reader.onload function – kurdtpage Feb 15 '16 at 0:30
  • Here is another cute drag and drop application that does NOT involve file uploads. Linking just in case somebody wants to study more. codepen.io/anon/pen/MOPvZK?editors=1010 – William Entriken Nov 29 '17 at 0:05
  • 1
    The IE 10 solution is to degrade and only show the input type=file – William Entriken Nov 29 '17 at 0:07

//----------App.js---------------------//
$(document).ready(function() {
    var holder = document.getElementById('holder');
    holder.ondragover = function () { this.className = 'hover'; return false; };
    holder.ondrop = function (e) {
      this.className = 'hidden';
      e.preventDefault();
      var file = e.dataTransfer.files[0];
      var reader = new FileReader();
      reader.onload = function (event) {
          document.getElementById('image_droped').className='visible'
          $('#image_droped').attr('src', event.target.result);
      }
      reader.readAsDataURL(file);
    };
});
.holder_default {
    width:500px; 
    height:180px; 
    border: 10px dashed #ccc;
}

#holder.hover { 
    width:400px; 
    height:180px; 
    border: 10px dashed #0c0 !important; 
}

.hidden {
    visibility: hidden;
}

.visible {
    visibility: visible;
}
<!DOCTYPE html>

<html>
    <head>
        <title> HTML 5 </title>
        <script type="text/javascript" src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.6.4/jquery.js"></script>
    </head>
    <body>
      <form method="post" action="http://example.com/">
        <div id="holder" style="" id="holder" class="holder_default">
          <img src="" id="image_droped" width="500" height="180" style="width:500px; height:180px; border: 10px dashed #7A97FC;" class=" hidden"/>
        </div>
      </form>
    </body>
</html>

  • 2
    What does it show the user? Can you make a fiddle or online example? – Rudie Jul 1 '14 at 22:08
  • @Rudie please click run code snippet and drag-n-drop one image to view, it will show the preview of image dropped. – Piccaza Jul 19 '17 at 14:22
  • +1 for cleanly demonstrating FileReader actually reading in the file. It's fairly trivial to update this code to actually handle the upload on drop too (which is my own use case) – jymbob Dec 20 '17 at 17:11

In theory, you could add an element overlaying the <input/>, and then use it's drop event to capture the files (using the File API) and pass them to input files array.

Except that a file input is read-only. This is an old problem.

You can however, bypass the form control completely and upload via XHR (not sure about the support for that):

You could also use an element in the surrounding area to cancel the drop event in Chrome, and prevent the default behaviour of loading the file.

Dropping multiple files over the input already works in Safari and Firefox.

  • 5
    Like I said in the question: I know XHR2 and I don't want to use it. I guess the iportant part: "the file input is read-only". That sucks... Cancelling the drop event isn't a bad idea! Not as good as I'd hoped, but probably the best. Dropping multiple files works in Chrome too btw. Chrome now also allows uploading directories. All very kewl and not helping my case =( – Rudie Nov 15 '11 at 13:02

I know some trick works in Chrome.

When you dropping a files into drop zone you got a dataTransfer.files object, that is a "FileList" type of object, that contains all the files you dragged. Meanwhile, element has property "files", that is the same "FileList" type object.

So, you can simply assing the dataTransfer.files object to input.files property.

  • 3
    Yes, it does these days. Not a trick. Very intentional. Also very intentionally very restricted. You can't add files to the list, or mutate the list at all. Dragging and dropping can remember files, and add onto them, but input.files can't =( – Rudie Feb 18 '17 at 11:24
  • This saved the day! Thank you. – ryabenko-pro Feb 22 '17 at 12:35

Awesome work by @BjarkeCK. I made some modifications to his work, to use it as method in jquery:

$.fn.dropZone = function() {
  var buttonId = "clickHere";
  var mouseOverClass = "mouse-over";

  var dropZone = this[0];
  var $dropZone = $(dropZone);
  var ooleft = $dropZone.offset().left;
  var ooright = $dropZone.outerWidth() + ooleft;
  var ootop = $dropZone.offset().top;
  var oobottom = $dropZone.outerHeight() + ootop;
  var inputFile = $dropZone.find("input[type='file']");
  dropZone.addEventListener("dragleave", function() {
    this.classList.remove(mouseOverClass);
  });
  dropZone.addEventListener("dragover", function(e) {
    console.dir(e);
    e.preventDefault();
    e.stopPropagation();
    this.classList.add(mouseOverClass);
    var x = e.pageX;
    var y = e.pageY;

    if (!(x < ooleft || x > ooright || y < ootop || y > oobottom)) {
      inputFile.offset({
        top: y - 15,
        left: x - 100
      });
    } else {
      inputFile.offset({
        top: -400,
        left: -400
      });
    }

  }, true);
  dropZone.addEventListener("drop", function(e) {
    this.classList.remove(mouseOverClass);
  }, true);
}

$('#drop-zone').dropZone();

Working Fiddle

For a CSS only solution:

<div class="file-area">
    <input type="file">
    <div class="file-dummy">
        <span class="default">Click to select a file, or drag it here</span>
        <span class="success">Great, your file is selected</span>
    </div>
</div>

.file-area {
    width: 100%;
    position: relative;
    font-size: 18px;
}
.file-area input[type=file] {
    position: absolute;
    width: 100%;
    height: 100%;
    top: 0;
    left: 0;
    right: 0;
    bottom: 0;
    opacity: 0;
    cursor: pointer;
}
.file-area .file-dummy {
    width: 100%;
    padding: 50px 30px;
    border: 2px dashed #ccc;
    background-color: #fff;
    text-align: center;
    transition: background 0.3s ease-in-out;
}
.file-area .file-dummy .success {
    display: none;
}
.file-area:hover .file-dummy {
    border: 2px dashed #1abc9c;
}
.file-area input[type=file]:valid + .file-dummy {
    border-color: #1abc9c;
}
.file-area input[type=file]:valid + .file-dummy .success {
    display: inline-block;
}
.file-area input[type=file]:valid + .file-dummy .default {
    display: none;
}

Modified from https://codepen.io/Scribblerockerz/pen/qdWzJw

For anyone who's looking to do this in 2018, I've got a much better and simpler solution then all the old stuff posted here. You can make a nice looking drag & drop box with just vanilla HTML, JavaScript and CSS.

(Only works in Chrome so far)

Let's start with the HTML.

<div>
<input type="file" name="file" id="file" class="file">
<span id="value"></span>
</div>

Then we'll get to the styling.

    .file {
        width: 400px;
        height: 50px;
        background: #171717;
        padding: 4px;
        border: 1px dashed #333;
        position: relative;
        cursor: pointer;
    }

    .file::before {
        content: '';
        position: absolute;
        background: #171717;
        font-size: 20px;
        top: 50%;
        left: 50%;
        transform: translate(-50%, -50%);
        width: 100%;
        height: 100%;
    }

    .file::after {
        content: 'Drag & Drop';
        position: absolute;
        color: #808080;
        font-size: 20px;
        top: 50%;
        left: 50%;
        transform: translate(-50%, -50%);
    }

After you've done this it already looks fine. But I imagine you'd like to see what file you actaully uploaded, so we're going to do some JavaScript. Remember that pfp-value span? That's where we'll print out the file name.

let file = document.getElementById('file');
file.addEventListener('change', function() {
    if(file && file.value) {
        let val = file.files[0].name;
        document.getElementById('value').innerHTML = "Selected" + val;
    }
});

And that's it.

  • I get a Uncaught TypeError: Cannot read property 'addEventListener' of null when i use this code - under Chrome - does it not work in latest versions of Chrome? – Fight Fire With Fire Jul 16 at 22:08
  • It works fine for me in the latest version of Chrome. Make sure you use the right ID's – Michael Aug 1 at 0:45

Few years later, I've built this library to do drop files into any HTML element.

You can use it like

const Droppable = require('droppable');

const droppable = new Droppable({
    element: document.querySelector('#my-droppable-element')
})

droppable.onFilesDropped((files) => {
    console.log('Files were dropped:', files);
});

// Clean up when you're done!
droppable.destroy();

What you could do, is display a file-input and overlay it with your transparent drop-area, being careful to use a name like file[1]. {Be sure to have the enctype="multipart/form-data" inside your FORM tag.}

Then have the drop-area handle the extra files by dynamically creating more file inputs for files 2..number_of_files, be sure to use the same base name, populating the value-attribute appropriately.

Lastly (front-end) submit the form.


All that's required to handle this method is to alter your procedure to handle an array of files.

  • 1
    The file input has a multiple attribute these days. No need for more than 1 file input. That's not the issue though. How do I get the File objects into the file input? I'm thinking this requires some code example... – Rudie Nov 11 '11 at 22:44
  • 1
    @Rudie you can't, that's the problem. – Ricardo Tomasi Nov 14 '11 at 7:17
  • 1
    Can't what? Multiple? Yes, you can. I just said that. The multiple isn't the problem. The getting the files from a (dragged) File object into a file input, that's the problem. – Rudie Nov 15 '11 at 12:54
  • @Rudie getting dragged file(s) into a file input is possible with Chrome/FF (using the files property), but i haven't managed in IE - have you had any luck? – jlb Aug 15 '16 at 11:03
  • 1
    @jlb What do you mean "using the files property"? Could you make an answer with relevant code? What I was looking for doesn't work/exist in any browser. – Rudie Aug 15 '16 at 17:09

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