5

I have this scenario:

I want to check for particular words, and if they match a term, I will have to update the content of that page and link it to the term. But for now I am focusing on getting the content pages which have a part of the content the same as a particular term.

This is an idea of what I need to do, but it is not working since the subquery returns more than one field.

I want to find WHERE m.module_content is LIKE any of the terms I have, but it should check with them all.

SELECT m.module_termid, t.term_name, m.module_name, m.module_content
FROM modules m
JOIN terms t ON m.module_termid = t.term_id
WHERE m.module_content LIKE  '%' || (SELECT term_name FROM terms) ||  '%'

module_content has text in html format, so eventually all I would need to do is, if it matches a term and it is not yet links, I will add a link to that particular term.

What is the best option to do here? (I am using mysql btw)

To give you an example of what the expected result is:

Terms: id: 1, name: hello Modules: id: 1, content: < p > Hello World < /p >

I would like that modules with id 1 is brought up, since it contains content which somewhere has the term name "hello"

Updated:

Tried Pablo's solution but this is what happens:

enter image description here

"Ray Davis" has nothing to do with the term "Float" for example, so that should not have appeared.

  • try my approach then :) – aF. Dec 22 '11 at 10:02
5

I think you just need to change your JOIN condition to something like:

SELECT m.module_termid, t.term_name, m.module_name, m.module_content
  FROM modules m
  JOIN terms t ON (m.module_content LIKE  '%' || t.term_name ||  '%')

Having said that, this could be potentially very inefficient. Consider using a FULL TEXT INDEX INSTEAD for this operation.

  • I think that is giving a Cartesian Product – Ryan S Nov 4 '11 at 10:24
  • It's not a complete cartesian product. It's a join on a condition that will generate NxM rows... And your join condition should be what you want: all rows where there is a term in terms table inside module_content. – Pablo Santa Cruz Nov 4 '11 at 10:38
  • You are right, ideally that is what I would have. Look at an example answer which came up (notice that Courtesy Double Up is the term and <p> Ray Davis </p> is the content, and this should not have come up unless the term name is Ray Davis: 4 Courtesy Double Up People Who Don't Understand Floating <p>Ray Davis.</p> – Ryan S Nov 4 '11 at 10:40
  • I updated the description with your suggestion, and said why it did not work. – Ryan S Nov 11 '11 at 10:35
4
+25

After a bit of research, my solution would look like this:

SELECT m.module_termid, t.term_name, m.module_name, m.module_content
  FROM modules m
  INNER JOIN terms t ON m.module_termid = t.term_id
  WHERE m.module_content LIKE CONCAT('%', TRIM(t.term_name), '%')

edit: Regarding Paul Morgans comment, I replaced CONCAT('%', t.term_name, '%') with CONCAT('%', TRIM(t.term_name), '%') so that all the whitespaces in t.term_name are stripped off. If you need the whitespaces in t.term_name, just remove the TRIM call and use the old version (CONCAT('%', t.term_name, '%'))

  • +1 but you need to trim t.term_name inside the CONCAT to get this working right. If you don't you're also requiring any trailing spaces in t.term_name. – Paul Morgan Dec 22 '11 at 3:31
2

MySQL does not have any concatenation operator, and the query should actually be written as:

SELECT m.module_termid, t.term_name, m.module_name, m.module_content
  FROM modules m
  JOIN terms t ON m.module_content LIKE CONCAT('%', t.term_name, '%');

But what happened:

m.module_content LIKE  '%' || t.term_name ||  '%'

is actually equivalent to

(m.module_content LIKE  '%') || (t.term_name) ||  ('%')

which is always 1. Thus, you have a Cartesian Product =)

UPD: more as a reference to myself, MySQL does have a concatenation operator ||, but to use it one should set PIPES_AS_CONCAT mode:

mysql> SET sql_mode= 'pipes_as_concat';
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.00 sec)

mysql> SELECT 'qwe' || 'asd';
+----------------+
| 'qwe' || 'asd' |
+----------------+
| qweasd         |
+----------------+
1 row in set (0.00 sec)
1

You may try this instead:

SELECT m.module_termid, t.term_name, m.module_name, m.module_content
  FROM modules m
  JOIN terms t ON (m.module_content LIKE  '%' + t.term_name +  '%')
1

Instead of "LIKE", using "IN" should be the solution: something like:-

SELECT m.module_termid, t.term_name, m.module_name, m.module_content
FROM modules m JOIN terms t ON m.module_termid = t.term_id
WHERE m.module_content IN (SELECT term_name FROM terms);

0

Try the below query -

SELECT 
    tp.module_termid, 
    tp.term_name, 
    tp.module_name,
    tp.module_content  
FROM (
        SELECT 
            m.module_termid, 
            t.term_name, 
            m.module_name, 
            m.module_content,
            IF(LOCATE(t.term_name,m.module_content)!=0, m.module_content, ' ') 
                as required_content 
        FROM modules m 
        LEFT JOIN terms t ON m.module_termid = t.term_id
     ) tp 
WHERE tp.required_content != '';

For the above query you will get all rows where term_name columns data is present as a whole word in modules table's module_content column. If you dont want to match only on whole word then in that case u can use MYSQL'S regular expression function in place of LOCATE function.

The documentation for LOCATE function can be found out here

0

I don't think it is a good way to resolve the problem like this.supports that you have a lot of module items,and the popular word is limit.each time you exec the sql,it needs lots of disk io and may block the online mysql db. my way is like this:

  1. invert index the module content.
  2. search the popular words with the index.
  3. bind the module id to the key word.

as you can see.it is very efficient and fast.so,the problem is how to make inverted index on the module content.sphinx will do a good job. hope this will help you:)

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.