78

Is there any way to group by all the columns of a table without specifying the column names? Like:

select * from table group by *
2
  • what are you trying to accomplish? – MarlonRibunal Apr 29 '09 at 4:45
  • 51
    Why would this be a meaningless question? Seems like something that any beginner sql programmer might ask. – womp Apr 29 '09 at 4:50
58

The DISTINCT Keyword


I believe what you are trying to do is:

SELECT DISTINCT * FROM MyFooTable;

If you group by all columns, you are just requesting that duplicate data be removed.

For example a table with the following data:

 id |     value      
----+----------------
  1 | foo
  2 | bar
  1 | foo
  3 | something else

If you perform the following query which is essentially the same as SELECT * FROM MyFooTable GROUP BY * if you are assuming * means all columns:

SELECT * FROM MyFooTable GROUP BY id, value;

 id |     value      
----+----------------
  1 | foo
  3 | something else
  2 | bar

It removes all duplicate values, which essentially makes it semantically identical to using the DISTINCT keyword with the exception of the ordering of results. For example:

SELECT DISTINCT * FROM MyFooTable;

 id |     value      
----+----------------
  1 | foo
  2 | bar
  3 | something else
3
  • i think that is not correct. if use row_number() over something, the distinct count more. if i have one x_code which have two y_code by join, the "distinct" brings me 2 rows and count two times over row_number(), but if i use group by correctily only brings me one. I'm going through it! I need a sequencial integer registry and "distinct" count me 2 times on x_code. – Natan Medeiros Apr 5 '16 at 12:29
  • This misses a few important cases such as UDAF's – WestCoastProjects Dec 9 '18 at 6:56
  • 1
    Using DISTINCT is not always possible directly. If a query contains the ORDER BY clause, then one might get an error: 'ERROR: for SELECT DISTINCT, ORDER BY expressions must appear in select list' The only solution in this situation is a nested query AFAIK. – prograils Feb 25 '19 at 12:25
20

He is trying find and display the duplicate rows in a table.

SELECT *, COUNT(*) AS NoOfOccurrences
FROM TableName GROUP BY *
HAVING COUNT(*) > 1

Do we have a simple way to accomplish this?

4
  • 1
    How do you know he wants to show duplicates, rather than simply show distinct rows? – pilcrow Oct 12 '12 at 2:31
  • 3
    I get a syntax error with GROUP BY *, in postgreSQL – Snow Jul 11 '19 at 13:30
  • i'm also looking to implement this use case, because i want to compare result sets from 2 different queries, including the number of duplicates. this is useful for refactoring – symbiont Dec 28 '20 at 12:00
  • 1
    This should be comment, not an answer – pdem Mar 19 at 8:57
11

If you are using SqlServer the distinct keyword should work for you. (Not sure about other databases)

declare @t table (a int , b int)

insert into @t (a,b) select 1, 1
insert into @t (a,b) select 1, 2
insert into @t (a,b) select 1, 1

select distinct * from @t

results in

a b
1 1
1 2
0
5

nope. are you trying to do some aggregation? if so, you could do something like this to get what you need

;with a as
(
     select sum(IntField) as Total
     from Table
     group by CharField
)
select *, a.Total
from Table t
inner join a
on t.Field=a.Field
5

I wanted to do counts and sums over full resultset. I achieved grouping by all with GROUP BY 1=1.

1
  • 1
    I don't know how this works but it's brilliant and exactly what I needed. Is this trick documented somewhere and it is supported by all major relational DBs? – kosmičák Aug 28 '20 at 10:38
3

Short answer: no. GROUP BY clauses intrinsically require order to the way they arrange your results. A different order of field groupings would lead to different results.

Specifying a wildcard would leave the statement open to interpretation and unpredictable behaviour.

1
  • 1
    "open to interpretation" This is easily addressed by specifying the natural order of the columns - i.e. the order in which they are defined. A wildcard syntax would be a useful feature. – WestCoastProjects Dec 9 '18 at 12:23
2

No because this fundamentally means that you will not be grouping anything. If you group by all columns (and have a properly defined table w/ a unique index) then SELECT * FROM table is essentially the same thing as SELECT * FROM table GROUP BY *.

3
  • 23
    Of course, if you don't have a unique index, SELECT * FROM table is not the same as SELECT * FROM table GROUP BY *. In that case, you can accomplish this using SELECT DISTINCT * FROM table. – Sören Kuklau Apr 29 '09 at 5:01
  • 8
    Having duplicate rows is a common thing you have to deal when inheriting projects - so I don't think that it is safe to assume someone would never want to remove duplicate rows. – Elijah Apr 29 '09 at 5:43
  • 6
    There is another case... SELECT t1.*,count(t2.items) FROM t1 LEFT JOIN t2 ON t1.id = t2.id GROUP BY t1.* – Danny Dulai Jul 22 '16 at 22:27
-1

Here is my suggestion:

DECLARE @FIELDS VARCHAR(MAX), @NUM INT

--DROP TABLE #FIELD_LIST

SET @NUM = 1
SET @FIELDS = ''

SELECT 
'SEQ' = IDENTITY(int,1,1) ,
COLUMN_NAME
INTO #FIELD_LIST
FROM Req.INFORMATION_SCHEMA.COLUMNS
WHERE TABLE_NAME = N'new340B'

WHILE @NUM <= (SELECT COUNT(*) FROM #FIELD_LIST)
BEGIN
SET @FIELDS = @FIELDS + ',' + (SELECT COLUMN_NAME FROM #FIELD_LIST WHERE SEQ = @NUM)
SET @NUM = @NUM + 1
END

SET @FIELDS = RIGHT(@FIELDS,LEN(@FIELDS)-1)

EXEC('SELECT ' + @FIELDS + ', COUNT(*) AS QTY FROM [Req].[dbo].[new340B] GROUP BY ' + @FIELDS + ' HAVING COUNT(*) > 1  ') 
0
-2

You can use Group by All but be careful as Group by All will be removed from future versions of SQL server.

1
  • 2
    ´Group by All´ has nothing to do with grouping by all columns ! – Patrick Honorez Nov 8 '13 at 10:16

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