13

this may seem like a overly complicated question, but it has me driving me a little nuts for some time. It is also for curiosity, because I already have a way of doing what I need, so is not that important.

In R, I need a function to return a named list object with all the arguments and the values entered by the user. For this I have made this code (toy example):

foo <- function(a=1, b=5, h='coconut') {
    frm <- formals(foo)
    parms <- frm
    for (i in 1:length(frm))
        parms[[i]] <- get(names(frm)[i])
    return(parms)
}

So when this is asked:

> foo(b=0)

$a
[1] 1

$b
[1] 0

$h
[1] "coconut"

This result is perfect. The thing is, when I try to use lapply to the same goal, so as to be a little more efficient (and elegant), it does not work as I want it to:

foo <- function(a=1, b=5, h='coconut') {
    frm <- formals(foo)
    parms <- lapply(names(frm), get)
    names(parms) <- names(frm)
    return(parms)
}

The problem clearly is with the environment in which get evaluates it's first argument (a character string, the name of the variable). This I know in part from the error message:

> foo(b=0)
Error in FUN(c("a", "b", "h")[[1L]], ...) : object 'a' not found

and also, because when in the .GlobalEnv environment there are objects with the right names, foo returns their values instead:

> a <- 100
> b <- -1
> h <- 'wallnut'
> foo(b=0)
$a
[1] 100

$b
[1] -1

$h
[1] "wallnut"

Obviously, as get by default evaluates in the parent.frame(), it searches for the objects in the .GlobalEnv environment, instead of that of the current function. This is strange, since this does not happen with the first version of the function.

I have tried many options to make the function get to evaluate in the right environment, but could not do it correctly (I've tried pos=-2,0,1,2 and envir=NULL as options).

If anyone happen to know a little more than me about environments, specially in this "strange" cases, I would love to know how to solve this.

Thanks for your time,

Juan

0

4 Answers 4

12

Edit of 2013-08-05

Using sapply() instead of lapply(), simplifies this considerably:

foo4 <- function(a=1, b=5, h='coconut') {
    frm <- formals(sys.function())
    sapply(names(frm), get, envir=sys.frame(sys.parent(0)), simplify=FALSE)
}
foo4(b=0, h='mango')

This, though, without sapply() or lapply() might be the more elegant solution:

foo5 <- function(a=1, b=5, h='coconut') {
    modifyList(formals(sys.function()), as.list(match.call())[-1])
}
foo5(b=0, h='mango')

Original post (2011-11-04)

After casting about a bit, this looks to be the best solution.

foo <- function(a=1, b=5, h='coconut') {
    frm <- formals(foo)
    parms <- lapply(names(frm), get, envir=sys.frame(sys.parent(0)))
    names(parms) <- names(frm)
    return(parms)
}
foo(b=0, h='mango')
# $a
# [1] 1

# $b
# [1] 0

# $h
# [1] "mango"

There's some subtle stuff going on here with the way that lapply scopes/evaluates the calls that it constructs. The details are hidden in a call to .Internal(lapply(X, FUN)), but for a taste, compare these two calls:

# With function matched by match.fun, search in sys.parent(0)
foo2 <- function(a=1, h='coconut') {
    lapply(names(formals()), 
           get, envir = sys.parent(0))
}

# With anonymous function, search in sys.parent(2)    
foo3 <- function(a=1, h='coconut') {
    lapply(names(formals()), 
           FUN = function(X) get(X, envir = sys.parent(2)))
}

foo4(a=0, h='mango')
foo5(a=0, h='mango')
8
  • 1
    ...even better if foo2 and foo3 got their own formals, and not foo's :-)
    – Tommy
    Commented Nov 5, 2011 at 0:04
  • 1
    To Josh: would it be the same if I use envr=sys.parent() + 1?
    – Juan
    Commented Nov 5, 2011 at 0:14
  • 1
    @Juan -- Thanks, by the way for the great original post. It drove me nuts too, for several hours there! Commented Nov 5, 2011 at 5:19
  • 1
    Instead of sys.frame(sys.parent(0)), I think environment() is a bit more obvious. In fact you could replace that entire line with mget(names(frm), environment())
    – hadley
    Commented Aug 7, 2013 at 1:50
  • 1
    Or you could replace the entire function with as.list(environment())
    – hadley
    Commented Aug 7, 2013 at 1:51
8

Just convert the current environment into a list:

foo <- function(a=1, b=5, h='coconut') {
  as.list(environment())
}
foo(a = 0, h = 'mango')
1
  • Yes, cool, that's probably exactly what the OP was really after. Commented Aug 7, 2013 at 9:14
1

This is adapted from @Josh O'Brien's solution above using sapply to automatically assign the correct names to the resulting list (saves one line of code):

foo <- function(a=1, b=5, h='coconut') {
    frm <- formals(foo)
    parms <- sapply(names(frm), get, envir=sys.frame(sys.parent(-1)), simplify=FALSE)
    return(parms)
}
1

In addition to the solid solution already posted, I thought I'd share what I think is the reason why this is happening:

This issue is not specific to lapply, but is rather due to the caller environment for get being different than the the execution environment for foo (which binds frm). The function get will first look for the named object in its caller environment, and if it's not there it will (with the default argument inherits = TRUE) look in the enclosing environments.

In your first example with the for loop, the caller environment for get is foo's execution environment (since for loops are executed in their current environment), and so it was able to find the names for frm.

However, in your second example, the caller environment for get is instead lapply's execution environment. Since frm doesn't exist there, get also searched in the enclosing environments. But the enclosing environment for lapply is namespace:base, which is itself enclosed in R_GlobalEnv. Since frm doesn't exist in any of these environments, get cannot find it and throws an error.

By implementing the solution already posted, you are telling get to look not in its caller environment, but instead to specifically look in foo's execution environment.

Here is a toy example that does not use lapply:

a <- 3

foo2 <- function(x, fun) {
  a <- 2
  out <- fun(x)
  return(out)
}

foo1 <- function(a=1) {
    print(get("a"))
    out <- foo2("a", get)
    print(out)
}

foo1()

You'll see that foo2("a", get) returns the value 2, since this is how a is defined in foo2 (whose execution environment is the caller environment for get). If you comment out the line a <- 2, then you'll see that foo2("a", get) returns the value 3. This is because get could not find a in foo2's execution environment, so it then looked for a in foo2's enclosing environment, which is R_GlobalEnv.

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