5

I'm Korean and I'm not good at English but if you give me a comment down there
I will be very pleased and will try to understand it.

I created, for example, 10 threads and tried to join them after creation and return the value.
But when I join the last thread, I get a segmentation fault.

The result comes out like this..

Before Thread 1 create
After Thread 1 create
Before Thread 0 create
After Thread 0 create
Before Thread 1 join
After Thread 1 join
Before Thread 0 join
Segmentation Fault(core dumped)

when I create 4 threads it's like

Before Thread 3 create
After Thread 3 create
Before Thread 2 create
After Thread 2 create
Before Thread 1 create
After Thread 1 create
Before Thread 0 create
After Thread 0 create
Before Thread 3 join
After Thread 3 join
Before Thread 2 join
After Thread 2 join
Before Thread 1 join
After Thread 1 join
Before Thread 0 join
Segmentation Fault(core dumped)

I can't seem to find why.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <pthread.h>
#include <unistd.h>

pthread_mutex_t mutex_lock;

struct arg_struct {
        int a;
        int b;
};

void *t_function(void *data) {
        pthread_mutex_lock(&mutex_lock);

        struct arg_struct *arg = (struct arg_struct *)data;
        long int s;

        s = arg->a;

        pthread_mutex_unlock(&mutex_lock);

        return (void **)s;
}

int main()
{
        int i;

        pthread_t p_thread[2];
        int thr_id;
        int status;

        struct arg_struct arg[2];

        for(i = 1; i >= 0; i--) {
                arg[i].a = i;
                arg[i].b = i;
        }

        pthread_mutex_init(&mutex_lock, NULL);

        for(i = 1; i >= 0; i--) {
                printf("Before Thread %d create\n", i);
                thr_id = pthread_create(&p_thread[i],NULL, t_function, (void *)&arg[i]);
                printf("After Thread %d create\n", i);
                usleep(1000);
        }

        int temp[2];

        for(i = 1; i >= 0; i--) {
                printf("Before Thread %d join\n", i);
                pthread_join(p_thread[i], (void**)&status);
                printf("After Thread %d join\n", i);
                temp[i] = status;
        }i

        printf("%d%d", temp[1], temp[0]);

        pthread_mutex_destroy(&mutex_lock);

        return 0;
}
2
  • I can't reproduce this, I've tried 2 and 4 threads. It works perfectly fine, even inside Valgrind. Can you tell us anything else about the problem? – VolatileDream Nov 5 '11 at 5:36
  • 1
    Have you tried a debugger? gdb is your friend. – vanza Nov 5 '11 at 5:41
9
    pthread_t p_thread[2];
    struct arg_struct arg[2];
    int temp[2];

You only allocated space for two elements here, so if you launch more than 2 threads you'll run off the end of the array and potentially crash or corrupt the stack.

Additionally:

            pthread_join(p_thread[i], (void**)&status);

status is an int, not a void *; attempting this will try to store a void * in an int. On many 64-bit platforms, this will also overflow (since void * will be 8 bytes while int is 4). Make status a void *, and stop trying to cast away compiler errors like this. They're errors for a reason.

4
  • Good point, but we still can't explain the segfault on 2 threads though. – VolatileDream Nov 5 '11 at 5:45
  • @IKS, you'll have to show the code where you changed those numbers then, it's perfectly possible you forgot to change one. Better yet, start using #defines or a variable to define how many threads to launch, and have both the loops and the array allocations use this variable/macro, to prevent inconsistencies. – bdonlan Nov 5 '11 at 5:46
  • 1
    I think I found out why that happened... I put 'status' as 'int' but since I am using 64bit machine, I should probably put 'status' as 'long int'... maybe... I'm not perfectly sure but it solves the problem for now. – IKS Nov 5 '11 at 5:47
  • @IKS, make status a void *. On some 64-bit OSes even long is 32-bit. This way your code is guaranteed to be correct, and you can even get rid of that cast – bdonlan Nov 5 '11 at 5:48

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