23

For example:

string element = 'a';
IEnumerable<string> list = new List<string>{ 'b', 'c', 'd' };

IEnumerable<string> singleList = ???; //singleList yields 'a', 'b', 'c', 'd' 
2
  • 3
    In .NET Core it is built-in: public static System.Collections.Generic.IEnumerable<TSource> Prepend<TSource> (this System.Collections.Generic.IEnumerable<TSource> source, TSource element); (docs.microsoft.com/en-us/dotnet/api/…) Jul 17 '17 at 7:47
  • 2
    And as part of implementing .Net Standard 2.0, it is included in .Net 4.7.1.
    – NetMage
    Nov 1 '17 at 21:43

11 Answers 11

35

I take it you can't just Insert into the existing list?

Well, you could use new[] {element}.Concat(list).

Otherwise, you could write your own extension method:

    public static IEnumerable<T> Prepend<T>(
            this IEnumerable<T> values, T value) {
        yield return value;
        foreach (T item in values) {
            yield return item;
        }
    }
    ...

    var singleList = list.Prepend("a");
4
  • 6
    @Ian: I think you mean The One True Brace Style, from K&R onwards.
    – Richard
    Apr 29 '09 at 14:24
  • Shouldn't that be Concat() instead of Union()? Union() returns only distinct elements.
    – Lucas
    Apr 29 '09 at 14:46
  • There was a typo: use Concat, not Union
    – jyoung
    Apr 29 '09 at 14:51
  • 4
    @Ian - I use that style of braces on forums to preserve vertical space. For actual code, I honestly don't care what the brace style is. Apr 29 '09 at 14:54
8

Since .NET framework 4.7.1 there is LINQ method for that:

list.Prepend("a");

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/dotnet/api/system.linq.enumerable.prepend?view=netframework-4.7.1

5
public static class IEnumerableExtensions
{
    public static IEnumerable<T> Prepend<T>(this IEnumerable<T> ie, T item)
    {
         return new T[] { item }.Concat(ie);
    }
}
0
5

You can roll your own:

static IEnumerable<T> Prepend<T>(this IEnumerable<T> seq, T val) {
 yield return val;
 foreach (T t in seq) {
  yield return t;
 }
}

And then use it:

IEnumerable<string> singleList = list.Prepend(element);
1
  • 2
    I think it should be "yield return t" inside the foreach and the method should be static
    – user1047100
    Oct 19 '12 at 13:37
3

This would do it...

IEnumerable<string> singleList = new[] {element}.Concat(list);

If you wanted the singleList to be a List then...

IEnumerable<string> singleList = new List<string>() {element}.Concat(list);

... works too.

4
  • In your second example, singleList is an IEnumerable, not a List.
    – Lucas
    Apr 29 '09 at 14:48
  • Fixed it for Martin.
    – NetMage
    Apr 21 '17 at 23:56
  • But it was rejected. Shouldn't editors have higher standard here, like being able to comprehend code?
    – NetMage
    Apr 28 '17 at 23:38
  • I think your edit was rejected because my second example is a List, but it's cast as an IEnumerable. The underlying data structure is a List, but exposed using the IEnumerable interface. The original question wanted to know how to prepend to an IEnumerable, so keeping the result as an IEnumerable makes sense. Apr 30 '17 at 9:47
3

Also:

IEnumerable<string> items = Enumerable.Repeat(item, 1).Concat(list);
2

I find it convenient to be able to prepend multiple items in a chainable fashion. This version takes advantage of extension methods and params.

As a note, this version implicitly allows null, but it's just as easy to change it to throw new NullReferenceException() if that's the desired behavior.

public static class IEnumerableExtensions
{
    public static IEnumerable<T> Prepend<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source, params T[] items)
    {
        return items.Concat(source ?? new T[0]);
    }
}

Allows for a very readable syntax for individual items:

GetItems().Prepend(first, second, third);

...and for collections of items:

GetItems().Prepend(GetMoreItems());

Finishing the example in the question results in:

string element = "a";
IEnumerable<string> list = new List<string>{ "b", "c", "d" };

IEnumerable<string> singleList = list.Prepend(element);
2
  • 1
    You seem to have a typo where you reference source but declare sources?
    – NetMage
    Nov 1 '17 at 21:42
  • No problem, this is my favorite from of Prepend - unfortunately not what .Net Core and .Net Standard 2.0 added.
    – NetMage
    Nov 2 '17 at 15:57
1

No, there's no such built-in statment, statement, but it's trivial to implement such function:

IEnumerable<T> PrependTo<T>(IEnumerable<T> underlyingEnumerable, params T[] values)
{
    foreach(T value in values)
        yield return value;

    foreach(T value in underlyingEnumerable)
        yield return value;
}

IEnumerable<string> singleList = PrependTo(list, element);

You can even make it an extension method if C# version allows for.

1
  • If you make this an extension method, You just implemented IEnumerable<T>.Union() :P
    – Lucas
    Apr 29 '09 at 14:41
1

Just as a reminder - List< T > is not the only type of container. If you find yourself adding elements to the front of the list quite frequently, you can also consider using Stack< T > to implement your container. Once you have a stack

var container = new Stack<string>(new string[] { "b", "c", "d" });

you can always "prepend" an element via

container.Push("a");

and still use the collection as IEnumerable< T > like in

foreach (var s in container)
    // do sth with s

besides all the other methods typical for a stack like Pop(), Peek(), ...

Some of the solutions above iterate through the whole IEnumeration< T > just to prepend one element (or more than one in one case). This can be a very expensive operation if your collection contains a large number of elements and the frequency of prepending is relatively high.

0

Looking at some of the examples, I think I'd prefer to reverse the extension to apply to the object.

public static IEnumerable<T> PrependTo<T>(this T value, IEnumerable<T> values) {
    return new[] { value }.Concat(values);
}

Used like

var singleList = element.PrependTo(list);
0

As pointed out by Niklas & NetMage in the comments.

There is a new built-in Prepend methond in C#.

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