163

I am trying to write a wrapper script for a command line program (svnadmin verify) that will display a nice progress indicator for the operation. This requires me to be able to see each line of output from the wrapped program as soon as it is output.

I figured that I'd just execute the program using subprocess.Popen, use stdout=PIPE, then read each line as it came in and act on it accordingly. However, when I ran the following code, the output appeared to be buffered somewhere, causing it to appear in two chunks, lines 1 through 332, then 333 through 439 (the last line of output)

from subprocess import Popen, PIPE, STDOUT

p = Popen('svnadmin verify /var/svn/repos/config', stdout = PIPE, 
        stderr = STDOUT, shell = True)
for line in p.stdout:
    print line.replace('\n', '')

After looking at the documentation on subprocess a little, I discovered the bufsize parameter to Popen, so I tried setting bufsize to 1 (buffer each line) and 0 (no buffer), but neither value seemed to change the way the lines were being delivered.

At this point I was starting to grasp for straws, so I wrote the following output loop:

while True:
    try:
        print p.stdout.next().replace('\n', '')
    except StopIteration:
        break

but got the same result.

Is it possible to get 'realtime' program output of a program executed using subprocess? Is there some other option in Python that is forward-compatible (not exec*)?

7
  • 1
    Have you tried omitting the sydout=PIPE so the subprocess writes directly to your console, bypassing the parent process?
    – S.Lott
    Apr 29, 2009 at 17:01
  • 5
    The thing is that I want to read the output. If it is output directly to the console, how could I do that? Also, I don't want the user to see the output from the wrapped program, just my output.
    – Chris Lieb
    Apr 29, 2009 at 17:07
  • 1
    Then why a "real-time" display? I don't get the use case.
    – S.Lott
    Apr 29, 2009 at 17:17
  • 8
    Don't use shell=True. It needlessy invokes your shell. Use p = Popen(['svnadmin', 'verify', '/var/svn/repos/config'], stdout=PIPE, stderr=STDOUT) instead
    – nosklo
    Apr 30, 2009 at 12:19
  • 3
    @S.Lott Basically, svnadmin verify prints a line of output for every revision that is verified. I wanted to make a nice progress indicator that wouldn't cause excessive amounts of output. Kind of like wget, for example
    – Chris Lieb
    May 1, 2009 at 0:26

20 Answers 20

90

I tried this, and for some reason while the code

for line in p.stdout:
  ...

buffers aggressively, the variant

while True:
  line = p.stdout.readline()
  if not line: break
  ...

does not. Apparently this is a known bug: http://bugs.python.org/issue3907 (The issue is now "Closed" as of Aug 29, 2018)

6
  • This is not the only mess in the old Python IO implementations. This is why Py2.6 and Py3k ended up with a completely new IO library.
    – Tim Lin
    Apr 30, 2009 at 2:38
  • 10
    This code will break if the subprocess returns an empty line. A better solution would be to use while p.poll() is None instead of while True, and remove the if not line
    – exhuma
    Dec 22, 2009 at 9:59
  • 7
    @exhuma: it works fine. readline returns "\n" on an empty line, which does not evaluate as true. it only returns an empty string when the pipe closes, which will be when the subprocess terminates. Apr 9, 2010 at 12:24
  • 1
    @Dave For future ref: print utf-8 lines in py2+ with print(line.decode('utf-8').rstrip()). Jun 20, 2016 at 16:05
  • 3
    Also for having real realtime read of the output of the process you will need to tell python that you do NOT want any buffering. Dear Python just give me the output directly. And here is how: You need to set the environment variable PYTHONUNBUFFERED=1 . This is especially useful for outputs which are infinite May 1, 2018 at 22:24
40

By setting the buffer size to 1, you essentially force the process to not buffer the output.

p = subprocess.Popen(cmd, stdout=subprocess.PIPE, bufsize=1)
for line in iter(p.stdout.readline, b''):
    print line,
p.stdout.close()
p.wait()
4
  • 1
    @nbro probably because p.stdout.close() is unclear. Jun 20, 2016 at 12:57
  • 3
    @nbro probably because code was given with no explanation... :/ Sep 14, 2018 at 23:22
  • 5
    What is this b'' about? Jan 24, 2019 at 9:49
  • 1
    @ManuelSchneid3r iter(<callable>, <string>) creates an iterable using each output of the <callable> until it returns the <string> (called sentinel). If you try to run p.stdout.readline many times you see that when it has nothing else to print it prints b'', and thus this is the appropriate sentinel to use in this case.
    – Soap
    Sep 7, 2020 at 17:52
32

You can direct the subprocess output to the streams directly. Simplified example:

subprocess.run(['ls'], stderr=sys.stderr, stdout=sys.stdout)
3
  • Does this allow you to also get the contents after the fact in .communicate()? Or are the contents lost to the parent stderr/stdout streams? Apr 18, 2019 at 18:55
  • Nope, no communicate() method on the returned CompletedProcess. Also, capture_output is mutually exclusive with stdout and stderr. Apr 19, 2019 at 3:03
  • 18
    This isn't "real-time", which is the whole point of this question. This waits until ls has finished running, and doesn't give you access to its output. (Also, the stdout and stderr keyword arguments are superfluous - you are simply specifying the default values explicitly.)
    – tripleee
    Oct 15, 2020 at 8:31
27

You can try this:

import subprocess
import sys

process = subprocess.Popen(
    cmd, stdout=subprocess.PIPE, stderr=subprocess.PIPE
)

while True:
    out = process.stdout.read(1)
    if out == '' and process.poll() != None:
        break
    if out != '':
        sys.stdout.write(out)
        sys.stdout.flush()

If you use readline instead of read, there will be some cases where the input message is not printed. Try it with a command the requires an inline input and see for yourself.

8
  • Yes, using readline() will stop printing (even with calling sys.stdout.flush())
    – Mark Ma
    Sep 5, 2013 at 4:04
  • 3
    Is this supposed to hang indefinitely? I would wish a given solution to also include boilerplate code for editing the loop when the initial subprocess is done. Sorry I no matter how many time I look into it, subprocess etcetera is something I just can't ever get to work. May 31, 2014 at 23:31
  • 1
    Why test for '' when in Python we can just use if not out?
    – Greg Bell
    Apr 23, 2015 at 20:54
  • 2
    this is the best solution for long-running jobs. but it should use is not None and not != None. You should not use != with None.
    – Cari
    Jul 29, 2015 at 15:30
  • 1
    Is stderr also displayed by this? Jun 18, 2018 at 15:30
14

In Python 3.x the process might hang because the output is a byte array instead of a string. Make sure you decode it into a string.

Starting from Python 3.6 you can do it using the parameter encoding in Popen Constructor. The complete example:

process = subprocess.Popen(
    'my_command',
    stdout=subprocess.PIPE,
    stderr=subprocess.STDOUT,
    shell=True,
    encoding='utf-8',
    errors='replace'
)

while True:
    realtime_output = process.stdout.readline()

    if realtime_output == '' and process.poll() is not None:
        break

    if realtime_output:
        print(realtime_output.strip(), flush=True)

Note that this code redirects stderr to stdout and handles output errors.

3
  • What is the meaning of process.poll() is not None? Dec 17, 2021 at 9:56
  • why testing if realtime_output == '' ?
    – Sion C
    Jan 11 at 12:11
  • @Mr_and_Mrs_D It means that the subprocess is terminated.
    – nal
    Apr 5 at 7:39
10

Real Time Output Issue resolved: I encountered a similar issue in Python, while capturing the real time output from C program. I added fflush(stdout); in my C code. It worked for me. Here is the code.

C program:

#include <stdio.h>
void main()
{
    int count = 1;
    while (1)
    {
        printf(" Count  %d\n", count++);
        fflush(stdout);
        sleep(1);
    }
}

Python program:

#!/usr/bin/python

import os, sys
import subprocess


procExe = subprocess.Popen(".//count", shell=True, stdout=subprocess.PIPE, stderr=subprocess.PIPE, universal_newlines=True)

while procExe.poll() is None:
    line = procExe.stdout.readline()
    print("Print:" + line)

Output:

Print: Count  1
Print: Count  2
Print: Count  3
3
  • 1
    This was the only thing which actually helped. I used the same code (flush(stdout)) in C++. Thanks! May 15, 2018 at 9:33
  • 1
    I was having the same problem with a python script calling another python script as a subprocess. On the subprocess prints, "flush" was necessary (print("hello", flush=True) in python 3). Also, lots of examples over there are still (2020) python 2, this is python 3, so +1
    – smajtkst
    Mar 20, 2020 at 16:42
  • for python3+, change line = procExe.stdout.readline() to line = procExe.stderr.readline()
    – robo-monk
    Dec 28, 2020 at 0:57
8

The Streaming subprocess stdin and stdout with asyncio in Python blog post by Kevin McCarthy shows how to do it with asyncio:

import asyncio
from asyncio.subprocess import PIPE
from asyncio import create_subprocess_exec


async def _read_stream(stream, callback):
    while True:
        line = await stream.readline()
        if line:
            callback(line)
        else:
            break


async def run(command):
    process = await create_subprocess_exec(
        *command, stdout=PIPE, stderr=PIPE
    )

    await asyncio.wait(
        [
            _read_stream(
                process.stdout,
                lambda x: print(
                    "STDOUT: {}".format(x.decode("UTF8"))
                ),
            ),
            _read_stream(
                process.stderr,
                lambda x: print(
                    "STDERR: {}".format(x.decode("UTF8"))
                ),
            ),
        ]
    )

    await process.wait()


async def main():
    await run("docker build -t my-docker-image:latest .")


if __name__ == "__main__":
    loop = asyncio.get_event_loop()
    loop.run_until_complete(main())
3
  • 1
    Hi @Jeef can you point out the fix so I can update the answer?
    – Pablo
    Jun 11, 2019 at 10:47
  • 1
    Hi, that worked for me but I had to add the following to get rid of some error messages: import nest_asyncio; nest_asyncio.apply() and to use shell command, i.e. process = await create_subprocess_shell(*command, stdout=PIPE, stderr=PIPE, shell=True) instead of process = await create_subprocess_exec(...). Cheers!
    – user319436
    Sep 26, 2019 at 3:36
  • May as well just use a socket and save yourself the trouble.
    – ajsp
    Apr 23 at 10:26
5

Depending on the use case, you might also want to disable the buffering in the subprocess itself.

If the subprocess will be a Python process, you could do this before the call:

os.environ["PYTHONUNBUFFERED"] = "1"

Or alternatively pass this in the env argument to Popen.

Otherwise, if you are on Linux/Unix, you can use the stdbuf tool. E.g. like:

cmd = ["stdbuf", "-oL"] + cmd

See also here about stdbuf or other options.

(See also here for the same answer.)

0
4

Found this "plug-and-play" function here. Worked like a charm!

import subprocess

def myrun(cmd):
    """from
    http://blog.kagesenshi.org/2008/02/teeing-python-subprocesspopen-output.html
    """
    p = subprocess.Popen(cmd, shell=True, stdout=subprocess.PIPE,
                         stderr=subprocess.STDOUT)
    stdout = []
    while True:
        line = p.stdout.readline()
        stdout.append(line)
        print line,
        if line == '' and p.poll() != None:
            break
    return ''.join(stdout)
2
  • 1
    The addition of stderr=subprocess.STDOUT actually helps a lot in capturing streaming data. I am upvoting it.
    – khan
    May 10, 2017 at 0:59
  • 1
    The main beef here seems to come from the accepted answer
    – tripleee
    Jan 10, 2018 at 10:17
3

I ran into the same problem awhile back. My solution was to ditch iterating for the read method, which will return immediately even if your subprocess isn't finished executing, etc.

2

I used this solution to get realtime output on a subprocess. This loop will stop as soon as the process completes leaving out a need for a break statement or possible infinite loop.

sub_process = subprocess.Popen(my_command, close_fds=True, shell=True, stdout=subprocess.PIPE, stderr=subprocess.PIPE)

while sub_process.poll() is None:
    out = sub_process.stdout.read(1)
    sys.stdout.write(out)
    sys.stdout.flush()
2
  • 5
    is it possible that this will exit the loop without the stdout buffer being empty?
    – jayjay
    Jul 21, 2014 at 9:16
  • I have looked a lot for a suitable answer that didn't hang upon completion! I found this as a solution by adding if out=='': break after out = sub_process...
    – Sos
    Jul 23, 2019 at 14:17
2

You may use an iterator over each byte in the output of the subprocess. This allows inline update (lines ending with '\r' overwrite previous output line) from the subprocess:

from subprocess import PIPE, Popen

command = ["my_command", "-my_arg"]

# Open pipe to subprocess
subprocess = Popen(command, stdout=PIPE, stderr=PIPE)


# read each byte of subprocess
while subprocess.poll() is None:
    for c in iter(lambda: subprocess.stdout.read(1) if subprocess.poll() is None else {}, b''):
        c = c.decode('ascii')
        sys.stdout.write(c)
sys.stdout.flush()

if subprocess.returncode != 0:
    raise Exception("The subprocess did not terminate correctly.")
0
2

This is the basic skeleton that I always use for this. It makes it easy to implement timeouts and is able to deal with inevitable hanging processes.

import subprocess
import threading
import Queue

def t_read_stdout(process, queue):
    """Read from stdout"""

    for output in iter(process.stdout.readline, b''):
        queue.put(output)

    return

process = subprocess.Popen(['dir'],
                           stdout=subprocess.PIPE,
                           stderr=subprocess.STDOUT,
                           bufsize=1,
                           cwd='C:\\',
                           shell=True)

queue = Queue.Queue()
t_stdout = threading.Thread(target=t_read_stdout, args=(process, queue))
t_stdout.daemon = True
t_stdout.start()

while process.poll() is None or not queue.empty():
    try:
        output = queue.get(timeout=.5)

    except Queue.Empty:
        continue

    if not output:
        continue

    print(output),

t_stdout.join()
1

Complete solution:

import contextlib
import subprocess

# Unix, Windows and old Macintosh end-of-line
newlines = ['\n', '\r\n', '\r']
def unbuffered(proc, stream='stdout'):
    stream = getattr(proc, stream)
    with contextlib.closing(stream):
        while True:
            out = []
            last = stream.read(1)
            # Don't loop forever
            if last == '' and proc.poll() is not None:
                break
            while last not in newlines:
                # Don't loop forever
                if last == '' and proc.poll() is not None:
                    break
                out.append(last)
                last = stream.read(1)
            out = ''.join(out)
            yield out

def example():
    cmd = ['ls', '-l', '/']
    proc = subprocess.Popen(
        cmd,
        stdout=subprocess.PIPE,
        stderr=subprocess.STDOUT,
        # Make all end-of-lines '\n'
        universal_newlines=True,
    )
    for line in unbuffered(proc):
        print line

example()
3
  • 1
    Since you're using universal_newlines=True on the Popen() call, you probably don't need to put your own handling of them in, too -- that's the whole point of the option.
    – martineau
    Aug 20, 2013 at 12:15
  • 1
    it seems unnecessary complicated. It doesn't solve buffering issues. See links in my answer.
    – jfs
    Oct 16, 2014 at 20:05
  • This is the only way I could get rsync progress output in realtime(--outbuf=L) ! thanks Aug 25, 2015 at 15:29
1

if you just want to forward the log to console in realtime

Below code will work for both

 p = subprocess.Popen(cmd,
                         shell=True,
                         cwd=work_dir,
                         bufsize=1,
                         stdin=subprocess.PIPE,
                         stderr=sys.stderr,
                         stdout=sys.stdout)
1
  • 1
    This is an unholy mix of unnecessary complications. Just don't specify anything for stderr and stdout if you don't want to change where they are being sent. cwd=work_dir and shell=True seem out of place here, and bufsize=1 seems vaguely dubious, especially without any explanation.
    – tripleee
    May 31, 2021 at 6:13
1

Using pexpect with non-blocking readlines will resolve this problem. It stems from the fact that pipes are buffered, and so your app's output is getting buffered by the pipe, therefore you can't get to that output until the buffer fills or the process dies.

0

(This solution has been tested with Python 2.7.15)
You just need to sys.stdout.flush() after each line read/write:

while proc.poll() is None:
    line = proc.stdout.readline()
    sys.stdout.write(line)
    # or print(line.strip()), you still need to force the flush.
    sys.stdout.flush()
0

Few answers suggesting python 3.x or pthon 2.x , Below code will work for both.

 p = subprocess.Popen(cmd, shell=True, stdout=subprocess.PIPE, stderr=subprocess.STDOUT,)
    stdout = []
    while True:
        line = p.stdout.readline()
        if not isinstance(line, (str)):
            line = line.decode('utf-8')
        stdout.append(line)
        print (line)
        if (line == '' and p.poll() != None):
            break
0
def run_command(command):
process = subprocess.Popen(shlex.split(command), stdout=subprocess.PIPE)
while True:
    output = process.stdout.readline()
    if output == '' and process.poll() is not None:
        break
    if output:
        print(output.strip())
rc = process.poll()
return rc
0

Here is what worked for me:

import subprocess
import sys

def run_cmd_print_output_to_console_and_log_to_file(cmd, log_file_path):
    make_file_if_not_exist(log_file_path)
    logfile = open(log_file_path, 'w')

    proc=subprocess.Popen(cmd, stdout=subprocess.PIPE, stderr=subprocess.STDOUT, shell = True)
    for line in proc.stdout:
        sys.stdout.write(line.decode("utf-8") )
        print(line.decode("utf-8").strip(), file=logfile, flush=True)
    proc.wait()

    logfile.close()

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