11

In the last past days I noticed something weird optimizing my query. I have a simple query which does something like:

   SELECT id,name,amount FROM reservations WHERE NOT canceled ORDER BY name ASC

I noticed mysql wasn't using any index, so I started doing some experiments. Accidentally I replaced the "NOT canceled" with "canceled=false", and then, Mysql started using "canceled" as index. After that I tried using the opposite:

   SELECT ... FROM reservations WHERE canceled ORDER BY ...

Same result! When I change that to "canceled=true" the index works again.

My question is: HOW COME?! Isn't using "NOT" the "elegant" way? Anyhow I didn't expect for it to make any difference.

I'm using InnoDB as the engine, but i get same result using MyISAM. Can someone clarify things up? Thanks.

Edit: Table structure

CREATE TABLE `reservations` (
  `id` int(11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `trip_code` varchar(10) DEFAULT NULL,
  `departure_date` date DEFAULT NULL,
  `amount` float DEFAULT NULL,
  `name` varchar(45) DEFAULT NULL,
  `canceled` tinyint(1) NOT NULL DEFAULT '0',
  `created_date` date NOT NULL,
  `creator_user` int(11) NOT NULL DEFAULT '1',
  `last_update_user` int(11) NOT NULL DEFAULT '1',
  PRIMARY KEY (`id`),
  KEY `trip_code` (`trip_code`),
  KEY `departure_date` (`departure_date`),
  KEY `created_date` (`created_date`),
  KEY `canceled` (`canceled`)
) ENGINE=MyISAM  DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8 AUTO_INCREMENT=123181 ;
8
  • Server version: 5.1.43-community
    – Phoenix
    Nov 7, 2011 at 10:12
  • Can you post up the table's DDL.
    – a'r
    Nov 7, 2011 at 10:31
  • A column with only 2 values might not be selective enough to benefit from using an index anyway. Which query runs faster? Nov 7, 2011 at 11:10
  • Could you try to change the canceled column's type to bool, And tell me if it changes something? Nov 7, 2011 at 11:18
  • How many rows have value 0 and how many value 1? Nov 7, 2011 at 11:23

3 Answers 3

3

Even though it's using an index, the index (believe it or not) may make your query slower. It's a little weird, but it's related to index selectivity. It's generally presented in columns of type boolean.

It's descrbed like:

"How different values of a field are. It is a number from 0-1, although you can also think of it as a percentage. A value of 1, or 100%, means that each value in the field is unique"

It's important to consider becouse:

"MySQL has a cost-based optimizer. This means that MySQL calculates the costs of different ways of performing a query and then chooses the cheapest one. Well, calculating the costs is an inexact science. So an estimate is taken, and the estimate is wrong sometimes."

Plain simple:

If the data you're looking has more or less 20% of the same value (for example, cancelled has 40% of your table) then, it's simple to just do a table scan.

EDIT:

Regarding your question, EXPLAIN tells you that MySQL is using an index. But, it might not be good, the only way to note whether your optimization is better is to test performance. Also, consider the costo of INSERT, UPDATE and DELETE operations to keep that index. Do some profiling with and without the index.

Take a look at this:

1
  • Thanks for your answer. I understand that now. Regardless, the question still remains. how come "NOT var1" differs from "var1=false"?
    – Phoenix
    Nov 7, 2011 at 11:21
2

I am not familiar with MYSQL, but thinking logically, I understand it like this:
Index is like a phone book, when you are searching for "Cohen", you can get it right away.
But if you are looking for NOT "Cohen", you will have to run over every entry, and check if it's different from "Cohen".
So when you are looking for specific value, it looks just for it. And when you are using NOT, it looks for any other value that can fit inside tinyint(1) (as I understand it's not only 1 or 0, is it?).

5
  • I think they indicate in the question that WHERE canceled does not use an index too. Although not that clear what "Same result" refers to. Nov 7, 2011 at 11:39
  • Well I think, WHERE canceled is true when the canceled's value is 1, 2 or 3... So it's still not a specific value predicate Nov 7, 2011 at 11:49
  • Ignoring the fact that the column is declared as tinyint(1) the same non specificity would be the case for WHERE canceled = true. Nov 7, 2011 at 11:51
  • 2
    +1 Actually I was wrong about that. WHERE X will return a row with an X value of 2. WHERE X=true doesn't. I guess the true gets cast to int first then compared against the value so this is a sargable predicate. Nov 7, 2011 at 12:44
  • 1
    This is the closest answer I got from the post. I wasn't looking for the best way to implement my query, in fact I was only interested in knowing why is there a difference between var=false and NOT var
    – Phoenix
    Nov 8, 2011 at 16:42
1
SELECT *
FROM 
(SELECT 1 AS C, 0 AS X UNION ALL
SELECT 2 AS C, 1 AS X UNION ALL
SELECT 3 AS C, 2 AS X ) T
WHERE X=true

Returns

'2', '1'

And

SELECT *
FROM 
(SELECT 1 AS C, 0 AS X UNION ALL
SELECT 2 AS C, 1 AS X UNION ALL
SELECT 3 AS C, 2 AS X ) T
WHERE X

Returns

'2', '1'
'3', '2'

So it seems that in the first case the true gets cast to int and then used in a seekable predicate whereas in the second case the column value is implicitly cast. Implicit casts generally make a condition unsargable.

Looking at the explain plan for your query with WHERE canceled = true gives

+----+-------------+--------------+------+---------------+----------+---------+-------+------+-----------------------------+
| id | select_type |    table     | type | possible_keys |   key    | key_len |  ref  | rows |            Extra            |
+----+-------------+--------------+------+---------------+----------+---------+-------+------+-----------------------------+
|  1 | SIMPLE      | reservations | ref  | canceled      | canceled |       1 | const |    1 | Using where; Using filesort |
+----+-------------+--------------+------+---------------+----------+---------+-------+------+-----------------------------+

Whereas for WHERE canceled you get

+----+-------------+--------------+------+---------------+-----+---------+-----+------+-----------------------------+
| id | select_type |    table     | type | possible_keys | key | key_len | ref | rows |            Extra            |
+----+-------------+--------------+------+---------------+-----+---------+-----+------+-----------------------------+
|  1 | SIMPLE      | reservations | ALL  |               |     |         |     |    2 | Using where; Using filesort |
+----+-------------+--------------+------+---------------+-----+---------+-----+------+-----------------------------+

So it appears that it can't even consider the index on canceled as a possible option in this case.

0

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.