297

I want to format a number to have two digits. The problem is caused when 09 is passed, so I need it to be formatted to 0009.

Is there a number formatter in JavaScript?

33 Answers 33

594
0

The best method I've found is something like the following:

(Note that this simple version only works for positive integers)

var myNumber = 7;
var formattedNumber = ("0" + myNumber).slice(-2);
console.log(formattedNumber);

For decimals, you could use this code (it's a bit sloppy though).

var myNumber = 7.5;
var dec = myNumber - Math.floor(myNumber);
myNumber = myNumber - dec;
var formattedNumber = ("0" + myNumber).slice(-2) + dec.toString().substr(1);
console.log(formattedNumber);

Lastly, if you're having to deal with the possibility of negative numbers, it's best to store the sign, apply the formatting to the absolute value of the number, and reapply the sign after the fact. Note that this method doesn't restrict the number to 2 total digits. Instead it only restricts the number to the left of the decimal (the integer part). (The line that determines the sign was found here).

var myNumber = -7.2345;
var sign = myNumber?myNumber<0?-1:1:0;
myNumber = myNumber * sign + ''; // poor man's absolute value
var dec = myNumber.match(/\.\d+$/);
var int = myNumber.match(/^[^\.]+/);

var formattedNumber = (sign < 0 ? '-' : '') + ("0" + int).slice(-2) + (dec !== null ? dec : '');
console.log(formattedNumber);

| improve this answer | |
  • 4
    @KeithPower that demo doesn't illustrate this – Joseph Marikle Nov 7 '11 at 21:49
  • 1
    @KeithPower Here's a demo that illustrates the above method: jsfiddle.net/bkTX3. Click on the box, change the value, and click off the box to see it in action. – Joseph Marikle Nov 7 '11 at 21:53
  • 1
    @Joseph .75 is transformed in 75. – Galled Nov 25 '11 at 22:06
  • @Galled normally that kind of thing is not needed with this form of formatting in my experience, but I've thrown together an edit that would cover that scenario. – Joseph Marikle Nov 26 '11 at 2:09
  • Also have a look at .toPrecision() method w3schools.com/jsref/jsref_toprecision.asp – Oleg Mar 19 '15 at 10:10
133
0

If the number is higher than 9, convert the number to a string (consistency). Otherwise, add a zero.

function n(n){
    return n > 9 ? "" + n: "0" + n;
}

n( 9); //Returns "09"
n(10); //Returns "10"
n(999);//Returns "999"
| improve this answer | |
  • 4
    what about negative time though. 0-1:20:00 – mjwrazor Aug 4 '16 at 19:50
132
1

Use the toLocaleString() method in any number. So for the number 6, as seen below, you can get the desired results.

(6).toLocaleString('en-US', {minimumIntegerDigits: 2, useGrouping:false})

Will generate the string '06'.

| improve this answer | |
  • 17
    This is definitely better than chopping strings by hand. More succinctly, and if your page might be used outside the US, you might want to tweak this to: (6).toLocaleString(undefined, {minimumIntegerDigits: 2}) – Mark Slater Jun 21 '16 at 8:35
  • 2
    Using this with IE 9 creates 6.00 instead of 06. – Drew Jul 28 '16 at 18:38
  • 1
    Works, but you need IE >= 11. – Saftpresse99 May 10 '17 at 8:44
  • 3
    I am all up for ignoring IE, but its not well supported in mobile browsers. src: developer.mozilla.org/en/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/… – chetan92 Jun 1 '17 at 15:32
  • 1
    By far the best answer! It handles decimal & negative numbers as well! – 71GA Jun 23 at 6:26
51
0

Here's a simple number padding function that I use usually. It allows for any amount of padding.

function leftPad(number, targetLength) {
    var output = number + '';
    while (output.length < targetLength) {
        output = '0' + output;
    }
    return output;
}

Examples:

leftPad(1, 2) // 01
leftPad(10, 2) // 10
leftPad(100, 2) // 100
leftPad(1, 3) // 001
leftPad(1, 8) // 00000001
| improve this answer | |
  • also has issues with negative time. Is there a fix for this? – mjwrazor Aug 4 '16 at 19:54
39
0

In all modern browsers you can use

numberStr.padStart(2, "0");

https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/String/padStart

function zeroPad(numberStr) {
  return numberStr.padStart(2, "0");
}

var numbers = [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10];

numbers.forEach(
  function(num) {
    var numString = num.toString();
    
    var paddedNum = zeroPad(numString);

    console.log(paddedNum);
  }
);

| improve this answer | |
20
0

@Lifehack's answer was very useful to me; where I think we can do it in one line for positive numbers

 String(input).padStart(2, '0');
| improve this answer | |
12
0
("0" + (date.getMonth() + 1)).slice(-2);
("0" + (date.getDay())).slice(-2);
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    I think you meant the following to get the day of the month: ("0" + (date.getDate())).slice(-2); – Jeff Moeller Mar 5 '15 at 21:36
11
0

You can do:

function pad2(number) {
   return (number < 10 ? '0' : '') + number
}

Example:

document.write(pad2(0) + '<br />');
document.write(pad2(1) + '<br />');
document.write(pad2(2) + '<br />');
document.write(pad2(10) + '<br />');
document.write(pad2(15) + '<br />');

Result:

00
01
02
10
15
| improve this answer | |
8
0

It seems you might have a string, instead of a number. use this:

var num = document.getElementById('input').value,
    replacement = num.replace(/^(\d)$/, '0$1');
document.getElementById('input').value = replacement;

Here's an example: http://jsfiddle.net/xtgFp/

| improve this answer | |
7
0

Quick and dirty one liner....

function zpad(n, len) {
  return 0..toFixed(len).slice(2,-n.toString().length)+n.toString();
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Excellent job. It's better to use this as extension method like this: Number.prototype.leftPad = String.prototype.leftPad = function (pad) { return 0..toFixed(pad).slice(2, -this.toString().length) + this.toString(); }; – ConductedClever Jan 5 '19 at 6:24
6
0

This is simple and works pretty well:

function twoDigit(number) {
  var twodigit = number >= 10 ? number : "0"+number.toString();
  return twodigit;
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    can be written as: return number >= 10 ? number : "0" + number.toString(); – apfz Feb 3 '15 at 9:36
6
0

Here is a very simple solution that worked well for me.

First declare a variable to hold your number.

var number;

Now convert the number to a string and hold it in another variable;

var numberStr = number.toString();

Now you can test the length of this string , if it is less than desired you can append a 'zero' at the beginning.

if(numberStr.length < 2){
      number = '0' + number;
}

Now use the number as desired

console.log(number);
| improve this answer | |
6
0

Here's the easiest solution I found:-

let num = 9; // any number between 0 & 99
let result = ( '0' + num ).substr( -2 );
| improve this answer | |
5
0

Improved version of previous answer

function atLeast2Digit(n){
    n = parseInt(n); //ex. if already passed '05' it will be converted to number 5
    var ret = n > 9 ? "" + n: "0" + n;
    return ret;
}

alert(atLeast2Digit(5));

| improve this answer | |
5
0

I know this is an ancient post, but I wanted to provide a more flexible and OO solution option.

I've extrapolated the accepted answer a bit and extended javascript's Number object to allow for adjustable zero padding:

Number.prototype.zeroPad = function(digits) {
  var loop = digits;
  var zeros = "";
  while (loop) {
    zeros += "0";
    loop--;
  }
  return (this.toString().length > digits) ?
    this.toString() : (zeros + this).slice(-digits);
}
var v = 5;
console.log(v.zeroPad(2)); // returns "05"
console.log(v.zeroPad(4)); // returns "0005"

Edit: Add code to prevent cutting off numbers longer than your requested digits.

NOTE: This is obsolete in all but IE. Use padStart() instead.

| improve this answer | |
4
0

There is not a built-in number formatter for JavaScript, but there are some libraries that accomplish this:

  1. underscore.string provides an sprintf function (along with many other useful formatters)
  2. javascript-sprintf, which underscore.string borrows from.
| improve this answer | |
3
0

or

function zpad(n,l){
   return rep(l-n.toString().length, '0') + n.toString();
}

with

function rep(len, chr) { 
   return new Array(len+1).join(chr);
}
| improve this answer | |
3
0

If you want to limit your digits at the same time:

function pad2(number) {
  number = (number < 10 ? '0' : '') + number;
  number = number.substring(0,2);
  return number;
}

This would also chop of any value that exceeds two digits. I have been extending this upon fanaur's solution.

| improve this answer | |
2
0
<html>
    <head>
        <script src="http://code.jquery.com/jquery-1.11.0.min.js"></script>
        <script type="text/javascript">
            $(document).ready(function(){
                $('#test').keypress(allowOnlyTwoPositiveDigts);
            });

            function allowOnlyTwoPositiveDigts(e){

                var test = /^[\-]?[0-9]{1,2}?$/
                return test.test(this.value+String.fromCharCode(e.which))
            }

        </script>
    </head>
    <body>
        <input id="test" type="text" />
    </body>
</html>
| improve this answer | |
2
0

Here's a simple recursive solution that works for any number of digits.

function numToNDigitStr(num, n)
{
    if(num >=  Math.pow(10, n - 1)) { return num; }
    return "0" + numToNDigitStr(num, n-1);
}
| improve this answer | |
2
0

If you don't have lodash in your project it will be an overkill to add the whole library just to use one function. This is the most sophisticated solution of your problem I've ever seen.

_.padStart(num, 2, '0')
| improve this answer | |
2
0

I built a pretty simple format function that I call whenever I need a simple date formatted. It deals with formatting single digits to double digits when they're less than 10. It kicks out a date formatted as Sat Sep 29 2018 - 00:05:44

This function is used as part of a utils variable so it's called as:

let timestamp = utils._dateFormatter('your date string');

var utils = {
  _dateFormatter: function(dateString) {
    let d = new Date(dateString);
    let hours = d.getHours();
    let minutes = d.getMinutes();
    let seconds = d.getSeconds();
    d = d.toDateString();
    if (hours < 10) {
      hours = '0' + hours;
    }
    if (minutes < 10) {
      minutes = '0' + minutes;
    }
    if (seconds < 10) {
      seconds = '0' + seconds;
    }
    let formattedDate = d + ' - ' + hours + ':' + minutes + ':' + seconds;
    return formattedDate;
  }
}
| improve this answer | |
1
0

Here's my version. Can easily be adapted to other scenarios.

function setNumericFormat(value) {
    var length = value.toString().length;
    if (length < 4) {
        var prefix = "";
        for (var i = 1; i <= 4 - length; i++) {
            prefix += "0";
        }
        return prefix + value.toString();
    }
    return  value.toString();
}
| improve this answer | |
1
0
    function colorOf(r,g,b){
  var f = function (x) {
    return (x<16 ? '0' : '') + x.toString(16) 
  };

  return "#" +  f(r) + f(g) + f(b);
}
| improve this answer | |
  • You should consider adding some context, not just code to your answers. – Mike May 22 '16 at 21:40
1
0

For anyone who wants to have time differences and have results that can take negative numbers here is a good one. pad(3) = "03", pad(-2) = "-02", pad(-234) = "-234"

pad = function(n){
  if(n >= 0){
    return n > 9 ? "" + n : "0" + n;
  }else{
    return n < -9 ? "" + n : "-0" + Math.abs(n);
  }
}
| improve this answer | |
1
0

with this function you can print with any n digits you want

function frmtDigit(num, n) {
    isMinus = num < 0;
    if (isMinus)
        num *= -1;
    digit = '';
    if (typeof n == 'undefined')
        n = 2;//two digits
    for (i = 1; i < n; i++) {
        if (num < (1 + Array(i + 1).join("0")))
            digit += '0';
    }
    digit = (isMinus ? '-' : '') + digit + num;
    return digit;
};
| improve this answer | |
1
0

my example would be:

<div id="showTime"></div>

    function x() {
    var showTime = document.getElementById("showTime");
    var myTime = new Date();
    var hour = myTime.getHours();
    var minu = myTime.getMinutes();
    var secs = myTime.getSeconds();
    if (hour < 10) {
        hour = "0" + hour
    };
    if (minu < 10) {
        minu = "0" + minu
    };
    if (secs < 10) {
        secs = "0" + secs
    };

    showTime.innerHTML = hour + ":" + minu + ":" + secs;
}

setInterval("x()", 1000)
| improve this answer | |
1
0

`${number}`.replace(/^(\d)$/, '0$1');

Regex is the best.

| improve this answer | |
  • This appears to be almost exactly the same as Joe's answer above. Please consider adding additional info to improve your answer, or delete it altogether. – Ethan Jun 8 '18 at 10:49
1
0

AS datatype in Javascript are determined dynamically it treats 04 as 4 Use conditional statement if value is lesser then 10 then add 0 before it by make it string E.g,

var x=4;
  x = x<10?"0"+x:x
 console.log(x); // 04
| improve this answer | |
1
0

Updated for ES6 Arrow Functions (Supported in almost all modern browsers, see CanIUse)

const formatNumber = n => ("0" + n).slice(-2);
| improve this answer | |

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