I need to concatenate two String arrays in Java.

void f(String[] first, String[] second) {
    String[] both = ???
}

What is the easiest way to do this?

  • 1
    Bytes.concat from Guava – Ben Page Mar 15 '16 at 11:27
  • 1
    I see a lot of responses here but the question is so worded ('easiest way' ?) that it does not allow to indicate the best answer... – Artur Opalinski May 15 '16 at 3:36
  • 2
    Dozens of answers here are copying the data into a new array because that is what was asked for - but copying data when not strictly necessary is a bad thing to do especially in Java. Instead, keep track of the indexes and use the two arrays as if they were joined. I have added a solution illustrating the technique. – Douglas Held Sep 4 '16 at 23:34
  • The simplest is that you probably shouldn't be using arrays in the first place, you should be using ArrayLists, and your output should be an ArrayList. Once you've made these your pre-condition, the operation is built-in--first.addAll(second). The only case where this wouldn't be pretty much automatic is when your arrays are non-object types (int, long, double, ...), in that case intrinsic arrays can have a big advantage over ArrayLists--but for Strings--meh – Bill K Aug 15 '17 at 16:27
  • 5
    The fact that a question like this currently has 50 different answers makes me wonder why Java never got a simple array1 + array2 concatenation. – JollyJoker Nov 28 '17 at 12:53

52 Answers 52

I found a one-line solution from the good old Apache Commons Lang library.
ArrayUtils.addAll(T[], T...)

Code:

String[] both = (String[])ArrayUtils.addAll(first, second);
  • 338
    I dunno, this is kind of cheating. I think most people probably won't want the extra dependency for this one method. – Outlaw Programmer Sep 23 '08 at 19:15
  • 139
    How is it "cheating" if it answers the question? Sure, having an extra dependency is probably overkill for this specific situation, but no harm is done in calling out that it exists, especially since there's so many excellent bits of functionality in Apache Commons. – Rob Oct 12 '08 at 15:58
  • 29
    I agree, this isn't really answering the question. High level libraries can be great, but if you want to learn an efficient way to do it, you want to look at the code the library method is using. Also, in many situations, you can't just through another library in the product on the fly. – AdamC Jun 18 '09 at 17:09
  • 66
    I think this is a good answer. POJO solutions have also been provided, but if the OP is using Apache Commons in their program already (altogether possible considering its popularity) he may still not know this solution. Then he wouldn't be "adding a dependency for this one method," but would be making better use of an existing library. – Adam Nov 17 '09 at 15:36
  • 7
    If you are always worried about not adding a library for a single method, no new libraries will ever get added. Given the excellent utilities present in Apache Commons, I highly recommend adding it when the very first use case arises. – Hindol Jun 25 '15 at 8:46

Here's a simple method that will concatenate two arrays and return the result:

public <T> T[] concatenate(T[] a, T[] b) {
    int aLen = a.length;
    int bLen = b.length;

    @SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
    T[] c = (T[]) Array.newInstance(a.getClass().getComponentType(), aLen + bLen);
    System.arraycopy(a, 0, c, 0, aLen);
    System.arraycopy(b, 0, c, aLen, bLen);

    return c;
}

Note like it will not work with primitives, only with object types.

The following slightly more complicated version works with both object and primitive arrays. It does this by using T instead of T[] as the argument type.

It also makes it possible to concatenate arrays of two different types by picking the most general type as the component type of the result.

public static <T> T concatenate(T a, T b) {
    if (!a.getClass().isArray() || !b.getClass().isArray()) {
        throw new IllegalArgumentException();
    }

    Class<?> resCompType;
    Class<?> aCompType = a.getClass().getComponentType();
    Class<?> bCompType = b.getClass().getComponentType();

    if (aCompType.isAssignableFrom(bCompType)) {
        resCompType = aCompType;
    } else if (bCompType.isAssignableFrom(aCompType)) {
        resCompType = bCompType;
    } else {
        throw new IllegalArgumentException();
    }

    int aLen = Array.getLength(a);
    int bLen = Array.getLength(b);

    @SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
    T result = (T) Array.newInstance(resCompType, aLen + bLen);
    System.arraycopy(a, 0, result, 0, aLen);
    System.arraycopy(b, 0, result, aLen, bLen);        

    return result;
}

Here is an example:

Assert.assertArrayEquals(new int[] { 1, 2, 3 }, concatenate(new int[] { 1, 2 }, new int[] { 3 }));
Assert.assertArrayEquals(new Number[] { 1, 2, 3f }, concatenate(new Integer[] { 1, 2 }, new Number[] { 3f }));
  • 1
    I like this suggestion since it is less dependent on the latest Java versions. In my projects I'm often stuck using older versions of Java or CLDC profiles where some of the facilities like those mentioned by Antti are not available. – Kevin Feb 7 '11 at 15:46
  • 3
    The following line will break the generic part: concatenate(new String[]{"1"},new Object[] { new Object()}) – dragon66 Jun 3 '15 at 2:09

It's possible to write a fully generic version that can even be extended to concatenate any number of arrays. This versions require Java 6, as they use Arrays.copyOf()

Both versions avoid creating any intermediary List objects and use System.arraycopy() to ensure that copying large arrays is as fast as possible.

For two arrays it looks like this:

public static <T> T[] concat(T[] first, T[] second) {
  T[] result = Arrays.copyOf(first, first.length + second.length);
  System.arraycopy(second, 0, result, first.length, second.length);
  return result;
}

And for a arbitrary number of arrays (>= 1) it looks like this:

public static <T> T[] concatAll(T[] first, T[]... rest) {
  int totalLength = first.length;
  for (T[] array : rest) {
    totalLength += array.length;
  }
  T[] result = Arrays.copyOf(first, totalLength);
  int offset = first.length;
  for (T[] array : rest) {
    System.arraycopy(array, 0, result, offset, array.length);
    offset += array.length;
  }
  return result;
}
  • 10
    @djBO: for primitive-typed arrays you'd need to make an overload for each type: just copy the code and replace each T with byte (and lose the <T>). – Joachim Sauer Jun 1 '11 at 6:01
  • can you plese tell me how to use <T> operator type in my class? – Johnydep Jun 27 '11 at 2:22
  • 5
    I'd add this to the beginning, just to be defensive. if (first == null) { if (second == null) { return null; } return second; } if (second == null) { return first; } – marathon Sep 22 '11 at 4:18
  • 4
    @djBo: what about:ByteBuffer buffer = ByteBuffer.allocate(array1.length + array2.length); buffer.put(array1); buffer.put(array2); return buffer.array(); – Sam Goldberg Dec 2 '11 at 15:29
  • 13
    There's a bug in this approach which becomes apparent if you invoke these functions with arrays of different component types, for example concat(ai, ad), where ai is Integer[] and ad is Double[]. (In this case, the type parameter <T> is resolved to <? extends Number> by the compiler.) The array created by Arrays.copyOf will have the component type of the first array, i.e. Integer in this example. When the function is about to copy the second array, an ArrayStoreException will be thrown. The solution is to have an additional Class<T> type parameter. – T-Bull Jul 25 '13 at 17:16

One-liner in Java 8:

String[] both = Stream.concat(Arrays.stream(a), Arrays.stream(b))
                      .toArray(String[]::new);

Or:

String[] both = Stream.of(a, b).flatMap(Stream::of)
                      .toArray(String[]::new);
  • 17
    How efficient is this? – Supuhstar Oct 2 '15 at 1:34
  • 5
    Worth a read: jaxenter.com/… tl;dr - streams could be performant or not, it depends on what you're doing with them and the constraints of the problem (isn't this always the answer? lol) – Trevor Brown Feb 25 '16 at 17:29
  • 4
    Additionally, if a or b are arrays of primitive types, their streams will need to be .boxed() so they are of type Stream rather than e.g. IntStream which cannot be passed as a parameter to Stream.concat. – Will Hardwick-Smith Jul 16 '16 at 9:59
  • 6
    @Will Hardwick-Smith: no, you only have to pick the right stream class, e.g. if a and b are int[], use int[] both = IntStream.concat(Arrays.stream(a), Arrays.stream(b)).toArray(); – Holger Jun 13 '17 at 12:28
  • 1
    @Supuhstar: It is probably not as fast as System.arrayCopy. But not particularly slow either. You probably have to do this a very many times with huge arrays in really performance sensitive contexts for the execution time difference to matter. – Lii Dec 23 '17 at 15:43

Or with the beloved Guava:

String[] both = ObjectArrays.concat(first, second, String.class);

Also, there are versions for primitive arrays:

  • Booleans.concat(first, second)
  • Bytes.concat(first, second)
  • Chars.concat(first, second)
  • Doubles.concat(first, second)
  • Shorts.concat(first, second)
  • Ints.concat(first, second)
  • Longs.concat(first, second)
  • Floats.concat(first, second)
  • As much as I love Guava, the method from Apache Commons deals better with nullables. – Ravi Wallau Nov 1 '13 at 19:19
  • 6
    While it is good to use libraries, it's unfortunate that the problem has been abstracted away. Therefore the underlying solution remains elusive. – user924272 Apr 9 '14 at 0:15
  • 35
    Whats the problem with abstraction? Dunno what's the deal with reinventing the wheel here, if you want to learn the problem the check the source or read on it. Professional code should be using high-level libraries, much better if it's developed inside Google! – Breno Salgado Jul 15 '14 at 20:11
  • @RaviWallau Could you link to the class that does this? – Sébastien Tromp Jan 12 at 14:48
  • 1
    @SébastienTromp It is the top solution for this question - ArrayUtils. – Ravi Wallau Jan 13 at 4:45

Using the Java API:

String[] f(String[] first, String[] second) {
    List<String> both = new ArrayList<String>(first.length + second.length);
    Collections.addAll(both, first);
    Collections.addAll(both, second);
    return both.toArray(new String[both.size()]);
}
  • 11
    Simply, but inefficient as it make an array for ArrayList and then generate another for toArray method. But still valid as it's simple to read. – PhoneixS Mar 10 '14 at 12:16
  • applicable for Strings and objects (as question wants), but there is no addAll method for primary types (as ints) – joro Mar 23 at 7:20

A solution 100% old java and without System.arraycopy (not available in GWT client for example):

static String[] concat(String[]... arrays) {
    int length = 0;
    for (String[] array : arrays) {
        length += array.length;
    }
    String[] result = new String[length];
    int pos = 0;
    for (String[] array : arrays) {
        for (String element : array) {
            result[pos] = element;
            pos++;
        }
    }
    return result;
}
  • reworked mine for File[], but it's the same. Thanks for your solution – ShadowFlame Sep 7 '12 at 10:49
  • 2
    Probably quite inefficient though. – JonasCz Apr 11 '15 at 20:34
  • You might want to add null checks. And perhaps set some of your variables to final. – Tripp Kinetics Sep 24 '15 at 14:31

I've recently fought problems with excessive memory rotation. If a and/or b are known to be commonly empty, here is another adaption of silvertab's code (generified too):

private static <T> T[] concat(T[] a, T[] b) {
    final int alen = a.length;
    final int blen = b.length;
    if (alen == 0) {
        return b;
    }
    if (blen == 0) {
        return a;
    }
    final T[] result = (T[]) java.lang.reflect.Array.
            newInstance(a.getClass().getComponentType(), alen + blen);
    System.arraycopy(a, 0, result, 0, alen);
    System.arraycopy(b, 0, result, alen, blen);
    return result;
}

(In either case, array re-usage behaviour shall be clearly JavaDoced!)

  • 4
    this however means that you are returning the same array and changing a value on the returned array changes the value in the same position of the input array returned. – Lorenzo Boccaccia Nov 26 '08 at 17:55
  • Yes - see comment at the end of my post regarding array re-usage. The maintenance overhead imposed by this solution was worth it in our particular case, but defensive copying should probably be used in most cases. – volley Mar 17 '09 at 14:43
  • Lorenzo / volley, can you explain which part in the code that cause array re-usage? I thought System.arraycopy copies the content of the array? – Rosdi Kasim May 13 '10 at 2:35
  • 4
    A caller would normally expect a call to concat() to return a newly allocated array. If either a or b is null, concat() will however return one of the arrays passed into it. This re-usage is what may be unexpected. (Yep, arraycopy only does copying. The re-usage comes from returning either a or b directly.) – volley May 14 '10 at 6:57

The Functional Java library has an array wrapper class that equips arrays with handy methods like concatenation.

import static fj.data.Array.array;

...and then

Array<String> both = array(first).append(array(second));

To get the unwrapped array back out, call

String[] s = both.array();
ArrayList<String> both = new ArrayList(Arrays.asList(first));
both.addAll(Arrays.asList(second));

both.toArray(new String[0]);
  • 3
    The answer is great but a tiny bit broken. To make it perfect you should pass to toArray() an array of the type you need. In the above example, the code should be: both.toArray(new String[0]) See: stackoverflow.com/questions/4042434/… – Ronen Rabinovici Feb 15 '17 at 20:12
  • Don't know why this answer isn't rated higher... though it does seem to need the change suggested by @RonenRabinovici – drmrbrewer Dec 2 '17 at 11:14
  • 3
    Or better, without unnecessary allocation of zero-length array: both.toArray(new String[both.size()]) ;) – Honza Jan 10 at 16:42

Here's an adaptation of silvertab's solution, with generics retrofitted:

static <T> T[] concat(T[] a, T[] b) {
    final int alen = a.length;
    final int blen = b.length;
    final T[] result = (T[]) java.lang.reflect.Array.
            newInstance(a.getClass().getComponentType(), alen + blen);
    System.arraycopy(a, 0, result, 0, alen);
    System.arraycopy(b, 0, result, alen, blen);
    return result;
}

NOTE: See Joachim's answer for a Java 6 solution. Not only does it eliminate the warning; it's also shorter, more efficient and easier to read!

  • You can suppress the warning for this method, but other than that there isn't much you can do. Arrays and generics don't really mix. – Dan Dyer Sep 25 '08 at 19:43
  • 3
    The unchecked warning can be eliminated if you use Arrays.copyOf(). See my answer for an implementation. – Joachim Sauer Apr 24 '09 at 7:30
  • @SuppressWarnings("unchecked") – Mark Renouf Apr 26 '09 at 19:21

Another way with Java8 using Stream

  public String[] concatString(String[] a, String[] b){ 
    Stream<String> streamA = Arrays.stream(a);
    Stream<String> streamB = Arrays.stream(b);
    return Stream.concat(streamA, streamB).toArray(String[]::new); 
  }

If you use this way so you no need to import any third party class.

If you want concatenate String

Sample code for concate two String Array

public static String[] combineString(String[] first, String[] second){
        int length = first.length + second.length;
        String[] result = new String[length];
        System.arraycopy(first, 0, result, 0, first.length);
        System.arraycopy(second, 0, result, first.length, second.length);
        return result;
    }

If you want concatenate Int

Sample code for concate two Integer Array

public static int[] combineInt(int[] a, int[] b){
        int length = a.length + b.length;
        int[] result = new int[length];
        System.arraycopy(a, 0, result, 0, a.length);
        System.arraycopy(b, 0, result, a.length, b.length);
        return result;
    }

Here is Main method

    public static void main(String[] args) {

            String [] first = {"a", "b", "c"};
            String [] second = {"d", "e"};

            String [] joined = combineString(first, second);
            System.out.println("concatenated String array : " + Arrays.toString(joined));

            int[] array1 = {101,102,103,104};
            int[] array2 = {105,106,107,108};
            int[] concatenateInt = combineInt(array1, array2);

            System.out.println("concatenated Int array : " + Arrays.toString(concatenateInt));

        }
    }  

We can use this way also.

You can append the two arrays in two lines of code.

String[] both = Arrays.copyOf(first, first.length + second.length);
System.arraycopy(second, 0, both, first.length, second.length);

This is a fast and efficient solution and will work for primitive types as well as the two methods involved are overloaded.

You should avoid solutions involving ArrayLists, streams, etc as these will need to allocate temporary memory for no useful purpose.

You should avoid for loops as these are not efficient. The built in methods use block-copy functions that are extremely fast.

Please forgive me for adding yet another version to this already long list. I looked at every answer and decided that I really wanted a version with just one parameter in the signature. I also added some argument checking to benefit from early failure with sensible info in case of unexpected input.

@SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
public static <T> T[] concat(T[]... inputArrays) {
  if(inputArrays.length < 2) {
    throw new IllegalArgumentException("inputArrays must contain at least 2 arrays");
  }

  for(int i = 0; i < inputArrays.length; i++) {
    if(inputArrays[i] == null) {
      throw new IllegalArgumentException("inputArrays[" + i + "] is null");
    }
  }

  int totalLength = 0;

  for(T[] array : inputArrays) {
    totalLength += array.length;
  }

  T[] result = (T[]) Array.newInstance(inputArrays[0].getClass().getComponentType(), totalLength);

  int offset = 0;

  for(T[] array : inputArrays) {
    System.arraycopy(array, 0, result, offset, array.length);

    offset += array.length;
  }

  return result;
}
  • I'd sum up the length in the same loop where you are doing your null check--but this is a really good summary of the other answers here. I believe it even handles intrinsic types like "int" without changing them to Integer objects which is really the ONLY reason to deal with them as arrays rather than just changing everything to ArrayLists. Also your method could take 2 arrays and a (...) parameter so the caller knows he needs to pass in at least two arrays before he runs it and sees the error, but that complicates the looping code.... – Bill K Aug 15 '17 at 16:34

You could try converting it into a Arraylist and use the addAll method then convert back to an array.

List list = new ArrayList(Arrays.asList(first));
  list.addAll(Arrays.asList(second));
  String[] both = list.toArray();
  • Good solution--would be better if the code was refactored to avoid arrays altogether in favor of ArrayLists, but that's outside the control of the "Answer" and up to the questioner. – Bill K Aug 15 '17 at 16:29
  • I count that it requires 4 additional temporary objects to work. – rghome Jul 25 at 7:31

Here a possible implementation in working code of the pseudo code solution written by silvertab.

Thanks silvertab!

public class Array {

   public static <T> T[] concat(T[] a, T[] b, ArrayBuilderI<T> builder) {
      T[] c = builder.build(a.length + b.length);
      System.arraycopy(a, 0, c, 0, a.length);
      System.arraycopy(b, 0, c, a.length, b.length);
      return c;
   }
}

Following next is the builder interface.

Note: A builder is necessary because in java it is not possible to do

new T[size]

due to generic type erasure:

public interface ArrayBuilderI<T> {

   public T[] build(int size);
}

Here a concrete builder implementing the interface, building a Integer array:

public class IntegerArrayBuilder implements ArrayBuilderI<Integer> {

   @Override
   public Integer[] build(int size) {
      return new Integer[size];
   }
}

And finally the application / test:

@Test
public class ArrayTest {

   public void array_concatenation() {
      Integer a[] = new Integer[]{0,1};
      Integer b[] = new Integer[]{2,3};
      Integer c[] = Array.concat(a, b, new IntegerArrayBuilder());
      assertEquals(4, c.length);
      assertEquals(0, (int)c[0]);
      assertEquals(1, (int)c[1]);
      assertEquals(2, (int)c[2]);
      assertEquals(3, (int)c[3]);
   }
}

Wow! lot of complex answers here including some simple ones that depend on external dependencies. how about doing it like this:

String [] arg1 = new String{"a","b","c"};
String [] arg2 = new String{"x","y","z"};

ArrayList<String> temp = new ArrayList<String>();
temp.addAll(Arrays.asList(arg1));
temp.addAll(Arrays.asList(arg2));
String [] concatedArgs = temp.toArray(new String[arg1.length+arg2.length]);
  • Simple and working. – Arief Rivai Dec 29 '14 at 22:27
  • 1
    ..But inefficient and slow. – JonasCz Apr 11 '15 at 20:36

This is a converted function for a String array:

public String[] mergeArrays(String[] mainArray, String[] addArray) {
    String[] finalArray = new String[mainArray.length + addArray.length];
    System.arraycopy(mainArray, 0, finalArray, 0, mainArray.length);
    System.arraycopy(addArray, 0, finalArray, mainArray.length, addArray.length);

    return finalArray;
}

How about simply

public static class Array {

    public static <T> T[] concat(T[]... arrays) {
        ArrayList<T> al = new ArrayList<T>();
        for (T[] one : arrays)
            Collections.addAll(al, one);
        return (T[]) al.toArray(arrays[0].clone());
    }
}

And just do Array.concat(arr1, arr2). As long as arr1 and arr2 are of the same type, this will give you another array of the same type containing both arrays.

  • For performance reasons, I would pre-compute the ArrayList's final size because ArrayList, by definition, allocates a new array and copies its elements every time the current array is full. Otherwise I would go straight for LinkedList which does not suffer such problem – usr-local-ΕΨΗΕΛΩΝ Aug 20 '15 at 8:07

This works, but you need to insert your own error checking.

public class StringConcatenate {

    public static void main(String[] args){

        // Create two arrays to concatenate and one array to hold both
        String[] arr1 = new String[]{"s","t","r","i","n","g"};
        String[] arr2 = new String[]{"s","t","r","i","n","g"};
        String[] arrBoth = new String[arr1.length+arr2.length];

        // Copy elements from first array into first part of new array
        for(int i = 0; i < arr1.length; i++){
            arrBoth[i] = arr1[i];
        }

        // Copy elements from second array into last part of new array
        for(int j = arr1.length;j < arrBoth.length;j++){
            arrBoth[j] = arr2[j-arr1.length];
        }

        // Print result
        for(int k = 0; k < arrBoth.length; k++){
            System.out.print(arrBoth[k]);
        }

        // Additional line to make your terminal look better at completion!
        System.out.println();
    }
}

It's probably not the most efficient, but it doesn't rely on anything other than Java's own API.

  • 1
    +1. It would be better to replace the second for loop with that: for(int j = 0; j < arr2.length; j++){arrBoth[arr1.length+j] = arr2[j];} – bancer Oct 28 '10 at 21:23

Here's my slightly improved version of Joachim Sauer's concatAll. It can work on Java 5 or 6, using Java 6's System.arraycopy if it's available at runtime. This method (IMHO) is perfect for Android, as it work on Android <9 (which doesn't have System.arraycopy) but will use the faster method if possible.

  public static <T> T[] concatAll(T[] first, T[]... rest) {
    int totalLength = first.length;
    for (T[] array : rest) {
      totalLength += array.length;
    }
    T[] result;
    try {
      Method arraysCopyOf = Arrays.class.getMethod("copyOf", Object[].class, int.class);
      result = (T[]) arraysCopyOf.invoke(null, first, totalLength);
    } catch (Exception e){
      //Java 6 / Android >= 9 way didn't work, so use the "traditional" approach
      result = (T[]) java.lang.reflect.Array.newInstance(first.getClass().getComponentType(), totalLength);
      System.arraycopy(first, 0, result, 0, first.length);
    }
    int offset = first.length;
    for (T[] array : rest) {
      System.arraycopy(array, 0, result, offset, array.length);
      offset += array.length;
    }
    return result;
  }
  • 1
    Good general idea, but to anyone implementing: I'd prefer a copyOf and non-copyOf versions than one that does both by way of reflection. – rektide Sep 12 '11 at 14:36

Another way to think about the question. To concatenate two or more arrays, one have to do is to list all elements of each arrays, and then build a new array. This sounds like create a List<T> and then calls toArray on it. Some other answers uses ArrayList, and that's fine. But how about implement our own? It is not hard:

private static <T> T[] addAll(final T[] f, final T...o){
    return new AbstractList<T>(){

        @Override
        public T get(int i) {
            return i>=f.length ? o[i - f.length] : f[i];
        }

        @Override
        public int size() {
            return f.length + o.length;
        }

    }.toArray(f);
}

I believe the above is equivalent to solutions that uses System.arraycopy. However I think this one has its own beauty.

How about :

public String[] combineArray (String[] ... strings) {
    List<String> tmpList = new ArrayList<String>();
    for (int i = 0; i < strings.length; i++)
        tmpList.addAll(Arrays.asList(strings[i]));
    return tmpList.toArray(new String[tmpList.size()]);
}

A simple variation allowing the joining of more than one array:

public static String[] join(String[]...arrays) {

    final List<String> output = new ArrayList<String>();

    for(String[] array : arrays) {
        output.addAll(Arrays.asList(array));
    }

    return output.toArray(new String[output.size()]);
}

Using only Javas own API:


String[] join(String[]... arrays) {
  // calculate size of target array
  int size = 0;
  for (String[] array : arrays) {
    size += array.length;
  }

  // create list of appropriate size
  java.util.List list = new java.util.ArrayList(size);

  // add arrays
  for (String[] array : arrays) {
    list.addAll(java.util.Arrays.asList(array));
  }

  // create and return final array
  return list.toArray(new String[size]);
}

Now, this code ist not the most efficient, but it relies only on standard java classes and is easy to understand. It works for any number of String[] (even zero arrays).

  • 15
    Had to downvote this one for all the unnecessary List object creation. – Outlaw Programmer Sep 23 '08 at 19:23

An easy, but inefficient, way to do this (generics not included):

ArrayList baseArray = new ArrayList(Arrays.asList(array1));
baseArray.addAll(Arrays.asList(array2));
String concatenated[] = (String []) baseArray.toArray(new String[baseArray.size()]);
String [] both = new ArrayList<String>(){{addAll(Arrays.asList(first)); addAll(Arrays.asList(second));}}.toArray(new String[0]);
  • 2
    Tricky, it compiles only if first and second are final – orique Jun 21 '13 at 13:20
  • 1
    True. I thought it was worth it to add a one-liner without external library. – Frimousse Jun 21 '13 at 13:59
  • 1
    ArrayList for concatenation and Double-Brace Initialisation.. – Clashsoft Mar 4 '15 at 17:34

A type independent variation (UPDATED - thanks to Volley for instantiating T):

@SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
public static <T> T[] join(T[]...arrays) {

    final List<T> output = new ArrayList<T>();

    for(T[] array : arrays) {
        output.addAll(Arrays.asList(array));
    }

    return output.toArray((T[])Array.newInstance(
        arrays[0].getClass().getComponentType(), output.size()));
}
  • T[] return type? – dotjoe Jun 18 '09 at 14:52
  • I still like Joachim Sauer's solution better. – Michael Myers Jun 18 '09 at 14:56
  • I'm still on Java 5 so can't use Arrays.copyOf() as Joachim is doing. – Damo Jun 18 '09 at 17:04

If you'd like to work with ArrayLists in the solution, you can try this:

public final String [] f(final String [] first, final String [] second) {
    // Assuming non-null for brevity.
    final ArrayList<String> resultList = new ArrayList<String>(Arrays.asList(first));
    resultList.addAll(new ArrayList<String>(Arrays.asList(second)));
    return resultList.toArray(new String [resultList.size()]);
}

protected by Sergey K. Mar 16 '14 at 8:28

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