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I've used NUnit for years but have always been annoyed that you're forced to move all of your testable functions to a separate assembly (DLL) so that you can write/run tests on them. For example, I have a Windows Forms project (I'm using MyProgram in this example) that has several classes that I'd like to test. With NUnit you'd have to extract those classes into another assembly (DLL) project so that the tests can be run. So my project, which used to contain just a single project, MyProgram, now requires 3 projects:

  1. MyProgram (Windows Forms application)
  2. MyProgramLib (Assembly to be unit tested, was part of MyProgram)
  3. MyTestLib (NUnit testing assembly)

You might ask why this is a problem. I have a couple reasons:

  1. Build complexity: Now I need to create and test a new assembly into the project.
  2. Development speed: It takes time for developers to switch to a different project to add/edit methods that make more logical sense in the main application.
  3. Difficult to manage: It's difficult to manage the code. Developers end up writing methods that are very long and verbose to describe what very specific thing the code is trying to achieve.

I know that testing works like this already with Java and Maven. I can just write the unit tests and I don't need to create the MyProgramLib project.

Do any of the other .NET unit testing frameworks (xUnit, MSTest, MbUnit, etc) support writing test without the MyProgramLib requirement?

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It's very possible to use NUnit to test exe projects as well as dll. An exe in .Net is really little different than a dll and it's possible to reference an exe from a dll or exe project. This means you can create an NUnit project, have it reference the exe and write your unit tests against types defined in the exe

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  • Thanks for the answer. I'm not aware of how this might be accomplished with any of the above-mentioned frameworks. Do you know of any examples? Nov 8 '11 at 17:57
  • @BrentM None on the web. I've done this many times though with NUnit. You usually have to add a reference to the compiled EXE directly vs. the project but after that it works fine
    – JaredPar
    Nov 8 '11 at 20:24
  • I made an assumption long ago that that EXE's are not assemblies and that totally threw me off the trail. Thanks for the nice answer! Nov 16 '11 at 18:04
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IMHO

  • Build complexity : maybe a bit. You've added another moving part.
  • Dev Speed - instead of switching to the exe project, you switch to the lib project.
  • Diff to manage.. that has got nothing to do with this partitioning scheme. Seems like an awareness or skill issue.

The pattern is due to the fact that historically you were not able to reference executables only libraries. It also makes sense in a way ; the app and the tests need to use/share the production code (libraries), hence we move it to a common project. This is actually a named pattern Humble Executable.

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I've used NUnit for years but have always been annoyed that you're forced to move all of your testable functions to a separate assembly (DLL) so that you can write/run tests on them.

As others have said, NUnit loads assemblies, not DLLs. Exes are assemblies too, and any publicly visible [TestFixture] will show up in NUnit if you load your assembly into the test runner.

You might ask why this is a problem. I have a couple reasons:

  • Build complexity: Now I need to create and test a new assembly into the project.

If you think about the whole project lifecycle then this might change how you approach the problem.

For example, you could think about assemblies in terms of what you version and ship separately, or in terms of what you deploy and test separately.

If you can say "it is just a UI fix, all I have to redeploy is the web site", or "I made a change in this assembly. I can simply add unit and integration tests for this and related assemblies, and run this area's regression tests" you're in a good spot.

If you must say "I must redeploy the whole application" or "I must rerun our entire regression suite", then you're in more trouble.

  • Development speed: It takes time for developers to switch to a different project to add/edit methods that make more logical sense in the main application.

Maybe the problem is that you think you have a "main application".

If you're writing a single app that talks to a server outside your control, and the only piece is a thin UI, then this makes sense. But even there you've probably got a few abstractions and potentially cross-project concepts that should be separated.

If you make this separation more obvious then developers will be able to navigate quickly, regardless of the number of assemblies.

  • Difficult to manage: It's difficult to manage the code. Developers end up writing methods that are very long and verbose to describe what very specific thing the code is trying to achieve.

This is really a separate problem. It is best managed without thinking about assemblies.

It really sounds like you should work more on your software design. The Single Responsibility Principle and other SOLID OO principles are going to help you more here than worrying about assemblies.

I've found it is often easier to navigate a larger number of assemblies when they aren't just big buckets of code. The division actually helps when it maps well to the software we're writing. But then again, I've been mired in .Net for the last half a decade so YMMV :)

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  • Thanks for the feedback. I didn't realize that EXE files were assemblies so that there is no need to add an extra "Lib" program for NUnit. That alleviates all three of my reasons above. Nov 16 '11 at 18:07

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