in C# I created a static class which had a number of mathematical helper functions I could call directly without creating an instance of the class. I cannot seem to get this to work in C++.

For example, if the class is called MathsClass and has a function called MultiplyByThree then I would use it like this:

float Variable1 = MathsClass.MultiplyByThree(Variable1);

In the C++ version of my code I am getting the errors:

 'MathsClass' : illegal use of this type as an expression

and

 error C2228: left of '.MultiplyByThree' must have class/struct/union

How would I write the C++ equivalent of the C# static class to give this kind of functionality?

up vote 8 down vote accepted

The easy answer is to use the :: operator instead of the . operator:

float Variable1 = MathsClass::MultiplyByThree(Variable1); 

But in C++, free functions are generally preferred over static class functions, unless you have a specific reason to put them in a class. For keeping them together, and not polluting the global namespace, you can put them in their own namespace:

In Math.h

namespace Math
{
    float MultiplyByThree(float x);
}

In Math.cpp:

#include "math.h"

namespace Math
{
    float MultiplyByThree(float x)
    {
        return x * 3;
    }
}

And to use it:

#include "math.h"

float Variable1 = Math::MultiplyByThree(Variable1); 

Even better, make it a template and the same code will work for floats, doubles, ints, complex, or any type that has operator* defined:

In Math.h

namespace Math
{
    template <typename T>
    T MultiplyByThree(T x)
    {
        return x * 3;
    }
}

The only issue being that you can't separate the definition into math.cpp, it has to be in the header.

  • just out of interest, how come you use the std namespace by writing using namespace std, but if you write your own namespace you do an #include? are they both interchangeable? – SirYakalot Nov 9 '11 at 16:03
  • 1
    using and #includes are unrelated. #include will inject whatever file is specified directly into the location of the #include. You can even #include something other than a header, though I've never yet encountered such a need. You need the include to get the declaration. You can but do not need to use the using and using namespace directive to avoid the need to scope into the namespace to access a member. The std namespace is very large and its members are declared/defined in many different headers. Thus, there is no "std.h" to include, but an std namespace. – Sion Sheevok Nov 9 '11 at 16:43

Use :: in place of .:

float Variable1 = MathsClass::MultiplyByThree(Variable1);

Also, make sure MultiplyByThree is declared static:

class MathsClass {
...

public:
  static float MultiplyByThree(float arg);

...
}

Lastly, if the class consists entirely of static helper functions, you might want to prohibit the creation of instances of MathsClass by making its constructor private.

The . operator only works on objects. The :: operator (Scope Resolution Operator) is used to access the members of a scope, in the sense of a namespace or type. The exact equivalent is like so:

class MathsClass
{
    static float MultiplyByThree(const float Value);
};

Calling it like so:

float TwoTimesThree = MathsClass::MultiplyByThree(2.0f);

I would not advise this however. Use a namespace instead. Does it make sense to allow the user to make a MathsClass object? If not, then simply make it a namespace. The syntax for calling the function remains the same.

namespace Maths
{
    float MultiplyByThree(const float Value);
}

float TwoTimesThree = Maths::MultiplyByThree(2.0f);

You can define Maths::MultiplyByThree in the header if you want it inlined (or attempt to inline it), but otherwise, you should define it separately in a ".CPP" file. In the ".CPP" file, you can either define it like this:

namespace Maths
{
    float MultiplyByThree(const float Value)
    {
        // Definition here.
    }
}

... or like this:

float Maths::MultiplyByThree(const float Value)
{
    // Definition here.
}

Assuming that MultiplyByThree is a static method, you should call it as:

float var1 = MathsClass::MultiplyByThree(varx);

Usually, standalone functions will go in a namespace rather than a class:

namespace Maths {
    template <typename T> T MultiplyByThree(T const & x) {return x * 3;}
}

You then use the scope-resolution operator to access the function: Maths::MultiplyByThree

If for some reason you really want to make it a static member of a class, then the syntax is the same: static members can be accessed as either class_name::member or object.member, but not as class_name.member.

Make all members of your class static and call them with the :: syntax.

The purpose of a C# static class is to prevent instantiation, so you should also make your MathsClass() constructor in the private section of your interface to prevent instantiation from ever occurring :)

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