2043

I have a need to add or prepend elements at the beginning of an array.

For example, if my array looks like below:

[23, 45, 12, 67]

And the response from my AJAX call is 34, I want the updated array to be like the following:

[34, 23, 45, 12, 67]

Currently I am planning to do it like this:

var newArray = [];
newArray.push(response);

for (var i = 0; i < theArray.length; i++) {
    newArray.push(theArray[i]);
}

theArray = newArray;
delete newArray;

Is there a better way to do this? Does JavaScript have any built-in functionality that does this?

The complexity of my method is O(n) and it would be really interesting to see better implementations.

3
  • 20
    FYI: If you need to continuously insert an element at the beginning of an array, it is faster to use push statements followed by a call to reverse, instead of calling unshift all the time. Feb 15, 2018 at 8:56
  • 2
    @JennyO'Reilly you should post this as an answer. Matched my use-case perfectly. thanks
    – rob
    Jun 7, 2018 at 12:19
  • 2
    Performance tests: jsperf.com/adding-element-to-the-array-start But the results are different for each browser.
    – Avernikoz
    Apr 23, 2019 at 18:34

13 Answers 13

3447

Use unshift. It's like push, except it adds elements to the beginning of the array instead of the end.

  • unshift/push - add an element to the beginning/end of an array
  • shift/pop - remove and return the first/last element of an array

A simple diagram...

   unshift -> [array] <- push
   shift   <- [array] -> pop
 

and chart:

          add  remove  start  end
   push    X                   X
    pop           X            X
unshift    X             X
  shift           X      X

Check out the MDN Array documentation. Virtually every language that has the ability to push/pop elements from an array will also have the ability to unshift/shift (sometimes called push_front/pop_front) elements, you should never have to implement these yourself.


As pointed out in the comments, if you want to avoid mutating your original array, you can use concat, which concatenates two or more arrays together. You can use this to functionally push a single element onto the front or back of an existing array; to do so, you need to turn the new element into a single element array:

const array = [3, 2, 1]

const newFirstElement = 4

const newArray = [newFirstElement].concat(array) // [ 4, 3, 2, 1 ]

console.log(newArray);

concat can also append items. The arguments to concat can be of any type; they are implicitly wrapped in a single-element array, if they are not already an array:

const array = [3, 2, 1]

const newLastElement = 0

// Both of these lines are equivalent:
const newArray1 = array.concat(newLastElement) // [ 3, 2, 1, 0 ]
const newArray2 = array.concat([newLastElement]) // [ 3, 2, 1, 0 ]

console.log(newArray1);
console.log(newArray2);

3
  • 62
    Using concat might be preferable as it returns the new array. Very useful for chaining. [thingToInsertToFront].concat(originalArray).reduce(fn).reverse().map(fn) etc... If you use unshift, you can't do that chaining because all you get back is the length.
    – StJohn3D
    Sep 23, 2016 at 18:27
  • 8
    shift/unshift, push/pop, splice. Very logical names for such methods.
    – linuxunil
    Apr 25, 2018 at 12:32
  • This one of the most easy to understand answers that I ever seen. Congrats for that. Apr 12 at 13:21
1598

array operations image

var a = [23, 45, 12, 67];
a.unshift(34);
console.log(a); // [34, 23, 45, 12, 67]

5
  • 174
    The reason why people need a visual guideline for 4 everyday used functions is because of the encrypted function names... Why is unshift not called Insert? Shift should be Remove. etc...
    – Pascal
    Jun 29, 2013 at 21:24
  • 95
    //Why is unshift not called Insert?// It comes from the conventions of the C programming language where array elements were treated like a stack. (see perlmonks.org/?node_id=613129 for a complete explanation)
    – dreftymac
    Jul 26, 2013 at 21:05
  • 34
    @Pascal No, insert and remove would be particularly bad names for this; they imply random access, instead of adding/removing from the front of the array
    – user229044
    Oct 22, 2013 at 13:06
  • 29
    I would have thought that unshift should remove the first key, and shift would insert at the first key, but that's just my general thought Sep 25, 2014 at 1:50
  • 6
    Mind that [23, 45, 12, 67].unshift(34) will not work. The Array must first be saved inside a variable, because unshift itself returns a value.
    – vsync
    Mar 15, 2017 at 15:12
319

With ES6, use the spread operator ...:

Demo

var arr = [23, 45, 12, 67];
arr = [34, ...arr]; // RESULT : [34,23, 45, 12, 67]

console.log(arr)

5
  • 31
    also creates a new array, useful for pure functions
    – devonj
    Aug 8, 2017 at 19:01
  • 1
    what is the performance implication here? Is it slower than using unshift()?
    – Peter T.
    Mar 2, 2018 at 9:49
  • 1
    Sure, it will be slower since it is an immutable array ( creating a new array). If you are working with a big array or the performance is your first requirement, please consider to use concat instead. Mar 2, 2018 at 15:42
  • performance is not important in 2018, new versions in browser and node get the same performance
    – stackdave
    Jul 16, 2018 at 6:11
  • 1
    @AbdennourTOUMI Just to clarify your comment. It is not creating an immutable array, it is just creating a new array without mutating the existing one.
    – Flimm
    Nov 11, 2021 at 11:38
89

Another way to do that is through concat:

var arr = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7];
console.log([0].concat(arr));

The difference between concat and unshift is that concat returns a new array. The performance between them could be found here.

function fn_unshift() {
  arr.unshift(0);
  return arr;
}

function fn_concat_init() {
  return [0].concat(arr)
}

Here is the test result:

Enter image description here

5
  • It would be good for your answer to append the performance comparison of both apart from adding the reference. Jun 15, 2016 at 9:12
  • I just got jsPerf is temporarily unavailable while we’re working on releasing v2. Please try again later from the link. Another good reason to include the results instead of linking to them.
    – Tigger
    Aug 21, 2016 at 1:00
  • jsPref result: unshift: 25,510 ±3.18% 99% slower concat: 2,436,894 ±3.39% fastest Nov 3, 2016 at 10:28
  • In the latest Safari, fn_unshift() runs faster.
    – passatgt
    Jul 21, 2017 at 13:22
  • In the latest Safari (v 10), fn_unshift() is slower again.
    – rmcsharry
    Nov 9, 2017 at 11:22
51

Quick Cheatsheet:

The terms shift/unshift and push/pop can be a bit confusing, at least to folks who may not be familiar with programming in C.

If you are not familiar with the lingo, here is a quick translation of alternate terms, which may be easier to remember:

* array_unshift()  -  (aka Prepend ;; InsertBefore ;; InsertAtBegin )     
* array_shift()    -  (aka UnPrepend ;; RemoveBefore  ;; RemoveFromBegin )

* array_push()     -  (aka Append ;; InsertAfter   ;; InsertAtEnd )     
* array_pop()      -  (aka UnAppend ;; RemoveAfter   ;; RemoveFromEnd ) 
26

Using ES6 destructuring (avoiding mutation off the original array):

const newArr = [item, ...oldArr]

1
25

Without Mutating

Actually, all unshift/push and shift/pop mutate the source array.

The unshift/push add an item to the existed array from begin/end and shift/pop remove an item from the beginning/end of an array.

But there are few ways to add items to an array without a mutation. the result is a new array, to add to the end of array use below code:

const originArray = ['one', 'two', 'three'];
const newItem = 4;

const newArray = originArray.concat(newItem); // ES5
const newArray2 = [...originArray, newItem]; // ES6+

To add to begin of original array use below code:

const originArray = ['one', 'two', 'three'];
const newItem = 0;

const newArray = (originArray.slice().reverse().concat(newItem)).reverse(); // ES5
const newArray2 = [newItem, ...originArray]; // ES6+

With the above way, you add to the beginning/end of an array without a mutation.

3
  • I just put an slice function at the end of originArray to prevent it from mutability. Dec 4, 2019 at 7:34
  • 1
    Awesome! When comes to (Redux) State management... this answer is precious! Feb 23, 2020 at 13:16
  • [newItem, ...originArray]; // ES6+ Is great syntax ! Worked perfect !! thanks.
    – Bat
    Oct 13, 2021 at 7:28
24

You have an array: var arr = [23, 45, 12, 67];

To add an item to the beginning, you want to use splice:

var arr = [23, 45, 12, 67];
arr.splice(0, 0, 34)
console.log(arr);

4
  • arr.splice(0, arr.length, 34);
    – Lior Elrom
    Oct 15, 2015 at 20:08
  • 1
    @LiorElrom what does your snippet do? Jun 22, 2016 at 11:31
  • @poushy it's browser specific, in Firefox 54 is unshift 50% faster (but mostly more readable)
    – icl7126
    May 17, 2017 at 7:16
  • @poushy Not anymore. Way slower.
    – Andrew
    Sep 12, 2019 at 16:15
17

Cheatsheet to prepend new element(s) into the array

1. Array#unshift

const list = [23, 45, 12, 67];

list.unshift(34);

console.log(list); // [34, 23, 45, 12, 67];

2. Array#splice

const list = [23, 45, 12, 67];

list.splice(0, 0, 34);

console.log(list); // [34, 23, 45, 12, 67];

3. ES6 spread...

const list = [23, 45, 12, 67];
const newList = [34, ...list];

console.log(newList); // [34, 23, 45, 12, 67];

4. Array#concat

const list = [23, 45, 12, 67];
const newList = [32].concat(list);

console.log(newList); // [34, 23, 45, 12, 67];

Note: In each of these examples, you can prepend multiple items by providing more items to insert.

8

If you need to continuously insert an element at the beginning of an array, it is faster to use push statements followed by a call to reverse, instead of calling unshift all the time.

Benchmark test: http://jsben.ch/kLIYf

3
  • 2
    Note: initial array should be empty.
    – 192kb
    Aug 15, 2019 at 10:12
  • In 2021 your benchmark shows a comprehensive win for unshift across all major desktop browsers (at least on this Mac). Jul 7, 2021 at 21:52
  • @OllyHodgson testing on Ubuntu Linux with Firefox: reverse solution is 3-times faster. Nov 6, 2021 at 10:22
8

Using splice we insert an element to an array at the begnning:

arrName.splice( 0, 0, 'newName1' );
0
6

If you want to push elements that are in an array at the beginning of your array, use <func>.apply(<this>, <Array of args>):

const arr = [1, 2];
arr.unshift.apply(arr, [3, 4]);
console.log(arr); // [3, 4, 1, 2]

0

let arr = [5, 6];

// using unshift
arr.unshift(4);
console.log('arr : ', arr);

// using spread operator 
arr = [3, ...arr];
console.log('arr : ', arr);

// using concat
arr = [2].concat(arr);
console.log('arr : ', arr);

// using splice
arr.splice(0, 0, 1)
console.log('arr : ', arr);

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