8

This question already has an answer here:

I run a script like:

sleep 20 &
PID=$!
kill -9 $PID >/dev/null 2>&1

I dont want the script show the output like:

line 51: 22943 Killed  sleep

I have no idea why this happen, I have redirect the output to /dev/null

marked as duplicate by tripleee bash Apr 6 '17 at 6:08

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

16

The message isn't coming from either kill or the background command, it's coming from bash when it discovers that one of its background jobs has been killed. To avoid the message, use disown to remove it from bash's job control:

sleep 20 &
PID=$!
disown $PID
kill -9 $PID
  • great, this is what i want, thanks a lot man.. – chemila Nov 10 '11 at 10:07
  • disown has implication of shell not sending SIGHUP to the child when it terminates, see this question. Here is the answer. – x-yuri May 24 '13 at 15:14
6

This can be done using 'wait' + redirection of wait to /dev/null :

sleep 2 &
PID=$!
kill -9 $PID
wait $PID 2>/dev/null
sleep 2
sleep 2
sleep 2

This script will not give the "killed" message:

-bash-4.1$ ./test
-bash-4.1$ 

While, if you try to use something like:

sleep 2 &
PID=$!
kill -9 $PID 2>/dev/null
sleep 2
sleep 2
sleep 2

It will output the message:

-bash-4.1$ ./test
./test: line 4:  5520 Killed                  sleep 2
-bash-4.1$

I like this solution much more than using 'disown' which may have other implications.

Idea source: https://stackoverflow.com/a/5722850/1208218

  • This can be slightly improved by changing the kill -9 statement to: kill -9 $PID 2>/dev/null This is because the kill may also output other messages like: line 3: kill: (3968) - No such process Depending on what the script is doing – Roel Van de Paar Apr 18 '12 at 0:02
0

Another way to disable job notifications is to put your command to be backgrounded in a sh -c 'cmd &' construct.

#!/bin/bash

# ...

sh -c '
sleep 20 &
PID=$!
kill -9 $PID # >/dev/null 2>&1
'

# ...
-1

I was able to accomplish this by redirecting the output of the command that I am running in the background. In your case it would look like:

sleep 20 >>${LOG_FILE} 2>&1 &

... or if you do not want a log file:

sleep 20 &> /dev/null &

Then, when you want to kill that background process' PID, it will not show on standard out.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.