41

So I'm pretty stumped on how to convert a string into an int using the try/except function. Does anyone know a simple function on how to do this? I feel like I'm still a little hazy on string and ints. I'm pretty confident that ints are related to numbers. Strings...not so much.

62

It is important to be specific about what exception you're trying to catch when using a try/except block.

string = "abcd"
try:
    i = int(string)
    print i
except ValueError:
    #Handle the exception
    print 'Please enter an integer'

Try/Excepts are powerful because if something can fail in a number of different ways, you can specify how you want the program to react in each fail case.

  • 4
    +1 for being specific. It's worth noting that the ValueError Exception instance will contain more information, viz. "invalid literal for int() with base 10: 'abcd'". – Johnsyweb Nov 10 '11 at 7:13
15

Here it is:

s = "123"
try:
  i = int(s)
except ValueError as verr:
  pass # do job to handle: s does not contain anything convertible to int
except Exception as ex:
  pass # do job to handle: Exception occurred while converting to int
  • Thanks! Seems easy enough. – user1039163 Nov 10 '11 at 7:00
  • 5
    -1 for catching almost every possible exception instead of just ValueError. You should only catch what you know how to deal with. – Ethan Furman Nov 10 '11 at 16:25
  • @Ethan: I agree, but flagging my answer as useless is a bit hard in my eyes... – gecco Nov 10 '11 at 19:28
  • 10
    Catching more than you need is very bad practice. Adjust your answer and I'll happily change my vote. – Ethan Furman Nov 10 '11 at 20:34
  • 2
    You're right. Fore the sake of better SO content. – gecco Nov 10 '11 at 21:37
9

Firstly, try / except are not functions, but statements.

To convert a string (or any other type that can be converted) to an integer in Python, simply call the int() built-in function. int() will raise a ValueError if it fails and you should catch this specifically:

In Python 2.x:

>>> for value in '12345', 67890, 3.14, 42L, 0b010101, 0xFE, 'Not convertible':
...     try:
...         print '%s as an int is %d' % (str(value), int(value))
...     except ValueError as ex:
...         print '"%s" cannot be converted to an int: %s' % (value, ex)
...
12345 as an int is 12345
67890 as an int is 67890
3.14 as an int is 3
42 as an int is 42
21 as an int is 21
254 as an int is 254
"Not convertible" cannot be converted to an int: invalid literal for int() with base 10: 'Not convertible'

In Python 3.x

the syntax has changed slightly:

>>> for value in '12345', 67890, 3.14, 42, 0b010101, 0xFE, 'Not convertible':
...     try:
...         print('%s as an int is %d' % (str(value), int(value)))
...     except ValueError as ex:
...         print('"%s" cannot be converted to an int: %s' % (value, ex))
...
12345 as an int is 12345
67890 as an int is 67890
3.14 as an int is 3
42 as an int is 42
21 as an int is 21
254 as an int is 254
"Not convertible" cannot be converted to an int: invalid literal for int() with base 10: 'Not convertible'

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