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I'm architecting and building some of the analytic tools for a web site.

I want the backend to use Apache, MySQL, and Java. The data sets sizes will be modest: 1K to 10K users, adding 1M records/year max.

The front-end will use HTML, CSS, javascript, jQuery and some jQuery plugins. We'll have several dozen Web pages, all data driven.

My main criteria is that I want it easy to build, and, especially, easy to modify, because it's a new concept and it will take time to refine.

Then I've two questions.

  1. ORM: We could use Hibernate, which I know is widely used and very functional. But I also know it's somewhat cumbersome and has performance problems. Are there other ORMs to recommend?
  2. Web application framework: Java Servlets are OK, but I've used JSPs and I don't like the way they embed Java and HTML, making it difficult to unit test the Java, and change anything. The alternatives I'm considering are Struts, Wicket (but, frankly, I editing big XLM files is painful) and Grails. Grails includes Grails Object Relational Mapping (GORM), which uses Hibernate. Are there others to consider? What would you use?

Thanks A

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ORM: We could use Hibernate, which I know is widely used and very functional. But I also know it's somewhat cumbersome and has performance problems.

I don't agree that Hibernate is widely regraded as cumbersome or having performance problems. Do you have any evidence to support these claims?

Web application framework: Java Servlets are OK, but I've used JSPs and I don't like the way they embed Java and HTML, making it difficult to unit test the Java, and change anything. The alternatives I'm considering are Struts, Wicket (but, frankly, I editing big XLM files is painful) and Grails. Grails includes Grails Object Relational Mapping (GORM), which uses Hibernate. Are there others to consider? What would you use?

The recommended practice for JSP development is to encapsulate view logic in tags and use the tags in JSPs instead of putting scriptlet (Java) code directly in the JSPs.

There are lots and lots of potential Java web frameworks to consider. If you're looking for a mature, widely-used, well-documented and architected Java framework, I would choose SpringMVC. If you're willing to consider something a bit more cutting-edge the Play framework is worth a look.

Personally, I would use Grails, but I already know Groovy/Grails pretty well, which may not be the case for you.

Update

As Todd pointed out in the comments below, GORM can now be thought of as an abstract persistence API. Although the default implementation uses Hibernate, it's also possible (by installing plugins) to use JPA, or various NoSQL databases.

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+1 for an answer that compliments mine very well... – hvgotcodes Nov 10 '11 at 14:30
1  
I would also add that GORM is NOT dependent upon (or require) the use of Hibernate, especially with Grails 2.0 where you now have GORM interfaces to many NoSQL databases. – Todd Nov 10 '11 at 14:42
    
I suppose that I was over-generalizing when I said "Hibernate ... is somewhat cumbersome and has performance problems.". However, I do know of one project that has, in my opinion, made the mistake of storing a large graph (actually about 2K graphs with |V| ~ 30K and |E| ~ 1M) in Hibernate. They've run into problems with performance, with crashes when thread stacks run out of room, and with failure of Hibernate to, as I understand it, fully follow foreign links when loading objects. – Arthur Nov 11 '11 at 4:10

ORM: We could use Hibernate, which I know is widely used and very functional. But I also know it's somewhat cumbersome and has performance problems. Are there other ORMs to recommend?

I don't agree with the assertion that hibernate is "cumbersome and has performance problems". Hibernate can be tuned to a very high degree to get some really fast data access. Also other factors can significantly impact data access performance, such as proper query design, indexes, and caching. No doubt, it takes someone knowledgeable to get every last drop of performance when using hibernate (or any data access layer), but the technology itself is not as you describe.

Grails includes Grails Object Relational Mapping (GORM), which uses Hibernate. Are there others to consider? What would you use?

Spring provides a full MVC stack for developing web apps. You can use it as your full stack and it will work well with jQuery (or any JS framework you want).

Grails is a great technology as well. It uses both Spring and Hibernate under the covers, and makes things easier by handling a lot of configuration for you. If you understand Spring and Hibernate, it's a natural step to evolve to Grails use. If you don't have a priori knowledge of the underlying technologies, you will have to learn them to use Grails efficiently. Bottom line is, if you know what you are doing with Grails, you can move very fast.

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this answer is remarkably similar to mine. Are you my long-lost brother? – Dónal Nov 10 '11 at 14:23
    
heh, evidently it is quite probable.... – hvgotcodes Nov 10 '11 at 14:29
    
+1 right back at you – Dónal Nov 10 '11 at 14:56
    
I love independent consistency. We should close comments before someone disagrees. – Arthur Nov 11 '11 at 4:21

Web application framework: Java Servlets are OK, but I've used JSPs and I don't like the way they embed Java and HTML, making it difficult to unit test the Java, and change anything. The alternatives I'm considering are Struts, Wicket (but, frankly, I editing big XLM files is painful)

Not sure I understood you, but if I did I'd like to clarify: Apache Wicket does not require "editing big [XML] files". It's strictly Java and HTML. If you already know object-oriented Java (and like it), Wicket can be a good fit for you.

Additionally, if most of your application is needing a CRUD frontend for a domain model that's persisted in a database, you should seriously consider Spring Roo. It does a lot of the work for you - persistence, configuration, and can even generate a CRUD web UI with a few commands. Think of it as the Java equivalent to Rails.

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