11

Is there any code out there (or a built-in function) which allows outputting a floating point number in engineering notation?

For example, 1.5e-4 would be displayed as 150µ and 5e-3 would be displayed as 5m.

  • There's nothing built in. However this forum thread has some code examples: techtalkz.com/c-c-sharp/… – Kevin Laity Apr 30 '09 at 17:46
  • 1
    "Engineering Notation" can also be formatted as scientific notation (i.e. using numerical power-of-three exponents rather than letters). It's a real shame these two options aren't available in the standard printf-type libraries: virtually every scientific calculator can do the numeric version of Engineering notation as standard, but I know of no programming language that supports it natively. I have resorted to writing my own converters in Java and Python, but it would be nice if I didn't have to redo this every time I needed to use a different language! – DrAl Aug 31 '10 at 13:20
  • What should be printed with a value just less than one thousand like 999.9999999? do you expect "1k" or "1000"? – chux Nov 29 '17 at 2:57
10

This may need refactoring:

private static string ToEngineeringNotation(this double d)
{
    double exponent = Math.Log10(Math.Abs(d));
    if (Math.Abs(d) >= 1)
    {
        switch ((int)Math.Floor(exponent))
        {
            case 0: case 1: case 2:
                return d.ToString();
            case 3: case 4: case 5:
                return (d / 1e3).ToString() + "k";
            case 6: case 7: case 8:
                return (d / 1e6).ToString() + "M";
            case 9: case 10: case 11:
                return (d / 1e9).ToString() + "G";
            case 12: case 13: case 14:
                return (d / 1e12).ToString() + "T";
            case 15: case 16: case 17:
                return (d / 1e15).ToString() + "P";
            case 18: case 19: case 20:
                return (d / 1e18).ToString() + "E";
            case 21: case 22: case 23:
                return (d / 1e21).ToString() + "Z";
            default:
                return (d / 1e24).ToString() + "Y";
        }
    }
    else if (Math.Abs(d) > 0)
    {
        switch ((int)Math.Floor(exponent))
        {
            case -1: case -2: case -3:
                return (d * 1e3).ToString() + "m";
            case -4: case -5: case -6:
                return (d * 1e6).ToString() + "μ";
            case -7: case -8: case -9:
                return (d * 1e9).ToString() + "n";
            case -10: case -11: case -12:
                return (d * 1e12).ToString() + "p";
            case -13: case -14: case -15:
                return (d * 1e15).ToString() + "f";
            case -16: case -17: case -18:
                return (d * 1e15).ToString() + "a";
            case -19: case -20: case -21:
                return (d * 1e15).ToString() + "z";
            default:
                return (d * 1e15).ToString() + "y";
        }
    }
    else
    {
        return "0";
    }
}
8

Here's a link to some Ruby code that does something similar, though it formats as dddem, where m, the exponent, is always a multiple of 3.

Transliteration to C#. Since I'm not familiar with the format I'm not sure this does exactly what you want. For example, 0.0015 formats as 2e-3. It would be reasonably trivial to substitute the Greek letters for the exponent using a case statement and UTF-8 or other encodings. The exercise is left to the reader.

public static class FormatExtensions
{
    public static string ToEngineering( this double value )
    {
        int exp = (int)(Math.Floor( Math.Log10( value ) / 3.0 ) * 3.0);
        double newValue = value * Math.Pow(10.0,-exp);
        if (newValue >= 1000.0) {
            newValue = newValue / 1000.0;
            exp = exp + 3;
        }
        return string.Format( "{0:##0}e{1}", newValue, exp);        
    }
}

Usage:

Console.WriteLine( ((double)15000).ToEngineering() );
double val = 15000;
Console.WriteLine( val.ToEngineering() );
  • This is perfect! – David Thielen Oct 6 '11 at 20:27
  • If value <= 0, Math.Log10(value) will return NaN. You need to consider this case. Also I'm not sure there will not be rounding problems. – Orace Oct 17 '14 at 13:38
6

Rather than subclassing, I'd take advantage of the fact that Double implements IFormattable and write an IFormatProvider that formats the number. Then I'd have code that looks similar to:

double d = 123.45;
Console.WriteLine(d.ToString(null, new MyCustomFormat()));
1

Combining two of the earlier answers and adding a unit (volt, etc.) gives nice tidy answers like 11000 volts as 11kV.

public static string ToEngineering(this double value, string unitName)
{
    int exp = (int)(Math.Floor(Math.Log10(value) / 3.0) * 3.0);
    double newValue = value * Math.Pow(10.0, -exp);
    if (newValue >= 1000.0)
    {
        newValue = newValue / 1000.0;
        exp = exp + 3;
    }
    var symbol = String.Empty;
    switch (exp)
    {
        case 3:
            symbol = "k";
            break;
        case 6:
            symbol = "M";
            break;
        case 9:
            symbol = "G";
            break;
        case 12:
            symbol = "T";
            break;
        case -3:
            symbol = "m";
            break;
        case -6:
            symbol = "μ";
            break;
        case -9:
            symbol = "n";
            break;
        case -12:
            symbol = "p";
            break;
        }

    return string.Format("{0:##0.000} {1}{2}", newValue, symbol, unitName);
}
0

This is an old thread, but the answer might as well be correct. Issues with the existing code: it doesn't handle NaN, any of the infinities, negative numbers, or very small number (like double.Epsilon). And you can't pass in a precision.

My code is:

    static string DoubleToEngineering(double value, string displayPrecision)
    {
        string Retval;
        if (double.IsNaN(value)
            || double.IsInfinity(value)
            || double.IsNegativeInfinity(value)
            || double.IsPositiveInfinity(value)
            || value == 0.0
            )
        {
            Retval  = String.Format("{0:" + "F" + displayPrecision + "}", value);
            return Retval;
        }
        bool isNeg = value < 0;
        if (isNeg) value = -value;

        int exp = (int)(Math.Floor(Math.Log10(value) / 3.0) * 3.0);
        int powerToRaise = -exp;
        double newValue = value;
        // Problem: epsilon is something-324
        // The biggest possible number is somethinge306
        // You simply can't do a Math.Power (10, 324), it becomes infiniity.
        if (powerToRaise > 300)
        {
            powerToRaise -= 300;
            newValue = newValue * Math.Pow(10.0, 300);
        }

        newValue = newValue * Math.Pow(10.0, powerToRaise);

        // I don't know when this below is triggered.
        if (newValue >= 1000.0)
        {
            newValue = newValue / 1000.0;
            exp = exp + 3;
        }
        var fmt = "{0:F" + displayPrecision + "}";
        Retval = String.Format (fmt, newValue);
        if (exp != 0) Retval += String.Format("e{0}", exp);
        if (isNeg) Retval = "-" + Retval;
        return Retval;
    }

Test cases are below. My personal standard for test cases (sorry, this doesn't follow the latest and best NUnit guidance): the public static Test() takes no parameters and return the number of errors. It normally calls a private static TestOne(args, expected) which calculates the actual value, compared to the expected value, and returns the number of errors.

   private static int TestDoubleToEngineeringOne(double value, string expected)
    {
        var fakePrecision = "4";
        int NError = 0;
        var actual = DoubleToEngineering(value, fakePrecision);
        if (actual != expected)
        {
            System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine($"ERROR: DoubleToEngineering({value}) expected {expected} actual {actual}");
            NError++;
        }
        return NError;
    }

    public static int TestDoubleToEngineering()
    {
        int NError = 0;
        NError += TestDoubleToEngineeringOne(0, "0.0000");
        NError += TestDoubleToEngineeringOne(1, "1.0000");
        NError += TestDoubleToEngineeringOne(2, "2.0000");
        NError += TestDoubleToEngineeringOne(3, "3.0000");
        NError += TestDoubleToEngineeringOne(10, "10.0000");
        NError += TestDoubleToEngineeringOne(999, "999.0000");
        NError += TestDoubleToEngineeringOne(1000, "1.0000e3");

        NError += TestDoubleToEngineeringOne(1.234E21, "1.2340e21");

        NError += TestDoubleToEngineeringOne(-1, "-1.0000");
        NError += TestDoubleToEngineeringOne(-999, "-999.0000");
        NError += TestDoubleToEngineeringOne(-1000, "-1.0000e3");


        NError += TestDoubleToEngineeringOne(0.1, "100.0000e-3");
        NError += TestDoubleToEngineeringOne(0.02, "20.0000e-3");
        NError += TestDoubleToEngineeringOne(0.003, "3.0000e-3");
        NError += TestDoubleToEngineeringOne(0.0004, "400.0000e-6");
        NError += TestDoubleToEngineeringOne(0.00005, "50.0000e-6");

        NError += TestDoubleToEngineeringOne(double.NaN, "NaN");
        NError += TestDoubleToEngineeringOne(double.PositiveInfinity, "∞");
        NError += TestDoubleToEngineeringOne(double.NegativeInfinity, "-∞");
        NError += TestDoubleToEngineeringOne(double.Epsilon, "4.9407e-324");
        NError += TestDoubleToEngineeringOne(double.MaxValue, "179.7693e306");
        NError += TestDoubleToEngineeringOne(double.MinValue, "-179.7693e306");

        return NError;
    }
0

Here is another version that handles negative and without rounding

public static string ToEngineering(this double value)
{
    var absValue = Math.Abs(value);
    var exp = absValue < 0.001 ? 0 : (int)(Math.Floor(Math.Log10(absValue) / 3.0) * 3.0);
    var newValue = value * Math.Pow(10.0, -exp);
    return $"{newValue}e{exp}";
}
0

I came here looking for a function that can take any numeric representation e.g. signed/unsigned int, float, double, decimal, numeric string, and while I found some inspiration Patrick McDonald's answer, I didn't find the full answer I was looking for, so I wrote my own solution that takes a numeric string, which can be obtained easily from any numeric type. I am sharing my solution in this thread for others to use if they wish to have something more generic:

public static string ToEngineeringNotation(string originalString, int? significantFigures = null)
{
  var str = originalString;

  // remove spaces and negative sign

  str.Replace(" ", "");
  string prefix = "";
  if (str[0] == '-')
  {
    str = str.Substring(1);
    prefix = "-";
  }

  // Get the exponent, remove the exponent nomenclature

  int exponent = 0;
  int exponentStrIndex = 0;
  if ((exponentStrIndex = str.IndexOfAny("Ee".ToArray())) >= 0)
  {
    string exponentStr = str.Substring(exponentStrIndex + 1);
    str = str.Substring(0, exponentStrIndex);
    Int32.TryParse(exponentStr, out exponent);
  }

  // remove the decimal point, and adjust the exponent so the decimal point
  // should go just after the first digit, and trim trailing zeros

  int currentDecimalPosition = str.IndexOf('.');
  if (currentDecimalPosition >= 0)
  {
    exponent += currentDecimalPosition-1;
    str = str.Replace(".", "");
  }
  else
  {
    exponent += str.Length - 1;
  }
  str = str.TrimEnd('0');

  // At this point we should only have digits, just return the original string if we don't

  if (!str.All(char.IsDigit))
  {
    return originalString;
  }

  // Trim leading zeros, the decimal point is effectively moved as it's
  // just after the first digit, so adjust the exponent

  int lengthBefore = str.Length;
  str = str.TrimStart('0');
  exponent += str.Length-lengthBefore;

  // work out how much we need to shift the decimal point to get
  // engineering notation

  var decimalShiftRequired = exponent % 3;
  if (decimalShiftRequired < 0)
    decimalShiftRequired += 3;

  // Put the decimal point back in, but move the decimal point right
  // according to the shift worked out above.

  if (significantFigures.HasValue && significantFigures.Value < str.Length)
  {
    str = str.Substring(0, significantFigures.Value);
  }
  if (exponent == 0)
  {
    decimalShiftRequired = 0;
  }
  str = str.PadRight(1 + decimalShiftRequired, '0');
  str = $"{str.Substring(0, 1 + decimalShiftRequired)}.{str.Substring(1 + decimalShiftRequired)}";
  exponent -= decimalShiftRequired;

  // Remove the decimal point if there are no digits after it
  str = str.TrimEnd('.');

  // Create a default suffix consisting of the exponent
  string suffix = exponent != 0 ? $"E{(exponent < 0 ? "" : "+")}{exponent}" : "";

  // Work out which letter to put on the end, if any. If no letter is found,
  // then the Exponent suffix above will be added without modification

  switch (exponent)
  {
    case 3:
      suffix = "k"; break;
    case 6:
      suffix = "M"; break;
    case 9:
      suffix = "G"; break;
    case 12:
      suffix = "T"; break;
    case 15:
      suffix = "P"; break;
    case 18:
      suffix = "E"; break;
    case 21:
      suffix = "Z"; break;
    case 24:
      suffix = "Y"; break;
    case -3:
      suffix = "m"; break;
    case -6:
      suffix = "μ"; break;
    case -9:
      suffix = "n"; break;
    case -12:
      suffix = "p"; break;
    case -15:
      suffix = "f"; break;
    case -18:
      suffix = "a"; break;
    case -21:
      suffix = "z"; break;
    case -24:
      suffix = "y"; break;
  }
  return $"{prefix}{str}{suffix}";
}

Here's the comment block that goes at the top of the above function, I've put it here at the end so people don't have to scroll through it to get to the code:

/// <summary>
/// Converts a numeric string to Engineering Notation
/// </summary>
/// <example>
/// class Program
/// {
///   static void Main(string[] args)
///   {
///     foreach(var a in SampleNumbers)
///     {
///        var leftPad = a < 0 ? "" : " ";
///        var rightPad = a < 0 ? "--> " : "-> ";
///        var original = $"{leftPad}{a.ToString().PadRight(22)}{rightPad}";
///        var engineering = $"{leftPad}{a.ToEngineeringNotation(256).PadRight(22)}{rightPad}";
///        var engineering3Figures = $"{leftPad}{a.ToEngineeringNotation(3)}";
///        Console.WriteLine($"/// {original}{engineering}{engineering3Figures}");
///     }
///     Console.ReadLine();
///   }
///     
///   private static IEnumerable<double> SampleNumbers
///   {
///     get
///     {
///       var testValues = new[]
///       {
///         Double.NaN,
///         Double.Epsilon,
///         Double.MinValue,
///         Double.MaxValue,
///         Double.NegativeInfinity,
///         Double.PositiveInfinity,
///         -300,
///         -30,
///         -1.1,
///         -1,
///         -0.1,
///         -0.01,
///         -0.001,
///         -0.0001,
///         0,
///         0.0001,
///         0.001,
///         0.01,
///         0.1,
///         1,
///         1.1,
///         30,
///         300
///       };
///  
///       foreach (double a in testValues)
///       {
///         yield return a;
///       }
///       for (int i = 28; i >= -28; --i)
///       {
///         yield return Math.Pow(10, i) * -1.234567890123;
///       }
///       for (int i = -28; i <= 28; ++i)
///       {
///         yield return Math.Pow(10, i) * 1.234567890123;
///       }
///     }
///   }
/// }
/// Gives the following output
/// 
///  NaN                   ->  NaN                   ->  NaN
///  4.94065645841247E-324 ->  4.94065645841247E-324 ->  4.94E-324
/// -1.79769313486232E+308--> -179.769313486232E+306--> -179E+306
///  1.79769313486232E+308 ->  179.769313486232E+306 ->  179E+306
/// -Infinity             --> -Infinity             --> -Infinity
///  Infinity              ->  Infinity              ->  Infinity
/// -30000                --> -30k                  --> -30k
/// -3000                 --> -3k                   --> -3k
/// -300                  --> -300                  --> -300
/// -30                   --> -30                   --> -30
/// -1.1                  --> -1.1                  --> -1.1
/// -1                    --> -1                    --> -1
/// -0.1                  --> -100m                 --> -100m
/// -0.01                 --> -10m                  --> -10m
/// -0.001                --> -1m                   --> -1m
/// -0.0001               --> -100μ                 --> -100μ
///  0                     ->  0                     ->  0
///  0.0001                ->  100μ                  ->  100μ
///  0.001                 ->  1m                    ->  1m
///  0.01                  ->  10m                   ->  10m
///  0.1                   ->  100m                  ->  100m
///  1                     ->  1                     ->  1
///  1.1                   ->  1.1                   ->  1.1
///  30                    ->  30                    ->  30
///  300                   ->  300                   ->  300
///  3000                  ->  3k                    ->  3k
///  30000                 ->  30k                   ->  30k
/// -1.234567890123E+28   --> -12.34567890123E+27   --> -12.3E+27
/// -1.234567890123E+27   --> -1.234567890123E+27   --> -1.23E+27
/// -1.234567890123E+26   --> -123.4567890123Y      --> -123Y
/// -1.234567890123E+25   --> -12.34567890123Y      --> -12.3Y
/// -1.234567890123E+24   --> -1.234567890123Y      --> -1.23Y
/// -1.234567890123E+23   --> -123.4567890123Z      --> -123Z
/// -1.234567890123E+22   --> -12.34567890123Z      --> -12.3Z
/// -1.234567890123E+21   --> -1.234567890123Z      --> -1.23Z
/// -1.234567890123E+20   --> -123.4567890123E      --> -123E
/// -1.234567890123E+19   --> -12.34567890123E      --> -12.3E
/// -1.234567890123E+18   --> -1.234567890123E      --> -1.23E
/// -1.234567890123E+17   --> -123.4567890123P      --> -123P
/// -1.234567890123E+16   --> -12.34567890123P      --> -12.3P
/// -1.234567890123E+15   --> -1.234567890123P      --> -1.23P
/// -123456789012300      --> -123.4567890123T      --> -123T
/// -12345678901230       --> -12.34567890123T      --> -12.3T
/// -1234567890123        --> -1.234567890123T      --> -1.23T
/// -123456789012.3       --> -123.4567890123G      --> -123G
/// -12345678901.23       --> -12.34567890123G      --> -12.3G
/// -1234567890.123       --> -1.234567890123G      --> -1.23G
/// -123456789.0123       --> -123.4567890123M      --> -123M
/// -12345678.90123       --> -12.34567890123M      --> -12.3M
/// -1234567.890123       --> -1.234567890123M      --> -1.23M
/// -123456.7890123       --> -123.4567890123k      --> -123k
/// -12345.67890123       --> -12.34567890123k      --> -12.3k
/// -1234.567890123       --> -1.234567890123k      --> -1.23k
/// -123.4567890123       --> -123.4567890123       --> -123
/// -12.34567890123       --> -12.34567890123       --> -12.3
/// -1.234567890123       --> -1.234567890123       --> -1.23
/// -0.1234567890123      --> -123.4567890123m      --> -123m
/// -0.01234567890123     --> -12.34567890123m      --> -12.3m
/// -0.001234567890123    --> -1.234567890123m      --> -1.23m
/// -0.0001234567890123   --> -123.4567890123μ      --> -123μ
/// -1.234567890123E-05   --> -12.34567890123μ      --> -12.3μ
/// -1.234567890123E-06   --> -1.234567890123μ      --> -1.23μ
/// -1.234567890123E-07   --> -123.4567890123n      --> -123n
/// -1.234567890123E-08   --> -12.34567890123n      --> -12.3n
/// -1.234567890123E-09   --> -1.234567890123n      --> -1.23n
/// -1.234567890123E-10   --> -123.4567890123p      --> -123p
/// -1.234567890123E-11   --> -12.34567890123p      --> -12.3p
/// -1.234567890123E-12   --> -1.234567890123p      --> -1.23p
/// -1.234567890123E-13   --> -123.4567890123f      --> -123f
/// -1.234567890123E-14   --> -12.34567890123f      --> -12.3f
/// -1.234567890123E-15   --> -1.234567890123f      --> -1.23f
/// -1.234567890123E-16   --> -123.4567890123a      --> -123a
/// -1.234567890123E-17   --> -12.34567890123a      --> -12.3a
/// -1.234567890123E-18   --> -1.234567890123a      --> -1.23a
/// -1.234567890123E-19   --> -123.4567890123z      --> -123z
/// -1.234567890123E-20   --> -12.34567890123z      --> -12.3z
/// -1.234567890123E-21   --> -1.234567890123z      --> -1.23z
/// -1.234567890123E-22   --> -123.4567890123y      --> -123y
/// -1.234567890123E-23   --> -12.34567890123y      --> -12.3y
/// -1.234567890123E-24   --> -1.234567890123y      --> -1.23y
/// -1.234567890123E-25   --> -123.4567890123E-27   --> -123E-27
/// -1.234567890123E-26   --> -12.34567890123E-27   --> -12.3E-27
/// -1.234567890123E-27   --> -1.234567890123E-27   --> -1.23E-27
/// -1.234567890123E-28   --> -123.4567890123E-30   --> -123E-30
///  1.234567890123E-28    ->  123.4567890123E-30    ->  123E-30
///  1.234567890123E-27    ->  1.234567890123E-27    ->  1.23E-27
///  1.234567890123E-26    ->  12.34567890123E-27    ->  12.3E-27
///  1.234567890123E-25    ->  123.4567890123E-27    ->  123E-27
///  1.234567890123E-24    ->  1.234567890123y       ->  1.23y
///  1.234567890123E-23    ->  12.34567890123y       ->  12.3y
///  1.234567890123E-22    ->  123.4567890123y       ->  123y
///  1.234567890123E-21    ->  1.234567890123z       ->  1.23z
///  1.234567890123E-20    ->  12.34567890123z       ->  12.3z
///  1.234567890123E-19    ->  123.4567890123z       ->  123z
///  1.234567890123E-18    ->  1.234567890123a       ->  1.23a
///  1.234567890123E-17    ->  12.34567890123a       ->  12.3a
///  1.234567890123E-16    ->  123.4567890123a       ->  123a
///  1.234567890123E-15    ->  1.234567890123f       ->  1.23f
///  1.234567890123E-14    ->  12.34567890123f       ->  12.3f
///  1.234567890123E-13    ->  123.4567890123f       ->  123f
///  1.234567890123E-12    ->  1.234567890123p       ->  1.23p
///  1.234567890123E-11    ->  12.34567890123p       ->  12.3p
///  1.234567890123E-10    ->  123.4567890123p       ->  123p
///  1.234567890123E-09    ->  1.234567890123n       ->  1.23n
///  1.234567890123E-08    ->  12.34567890123n       ->  12.3n
///  1.234567890123E-07    ->  123.4567890123n       ->  123n
///  1.234567890123E-06    ->  1.234567890123μ       ->  1.23μ
///  1.234567890123E-05    ->  12.34567890123μ       ->  12.3μ
///  0.0001234567890123    ->  123.4567890123μ       ->  123μ
///  0.001234567890123     ->  1.234567890123m       ->  1.23m
///  0.01234567890123      ->  12.34567890123m       ->  12.3m
///  0.1234567890123       ->  123.4567890123m       ->  123m
///  1.234567890123        ->  1.234567890123        ->  1.23
///  12.34567890123        ->  12.34567890123        ->  12.3
///  123.4567890123        ->  123.4567890123        ->  123
///  1234.567890123        ->  1.234567890123k       ->  1.23k
///  12345.67890123        ->  12.34567890123k       ->  12.3k
///  123456.7890123        ->  123.4567890123k       ->  123k
///  1234567.890123        ->  1.234567890123M       ->  1.23M
///  12345678.90123        ->  12.34567890123M       ->  12.3M
///  123456789.0123        ->  123.4567890123M       ->  123M
///  1234567890.123        ->  1.234567890123G       ->  1.23G
///  12345678901.23        ->  12.34567890123G       ->  12.3G
///  123456789012.3        ->  123.4567890123G       ->  123G
///  1234567890123         ->  1.234567890123T       ->  1.23T
///  12345678901230        ->  12.34567890123T       ->  12.3T
///  123456789012300       ->  123.4567890123T       ->  123T
///  1.234567890123E+15    ->  1.234567890123P       ->  1.23P
///  1.234567890123E+16    ->  12.34567890123P       ->  12.3P
///  1.234567890123E+17    ->  123.4567890123P       ->  123P
///  1.234567890123E+18    ->  1.234567890123E       ->  1.23E
///  1.234567890123E+19    ->  12.34567890123E       ->  12.3E
///  1.234567890123E+20    ->  123.4567890123E       ->  123E
///  1.234567890123E+21    ->  1.234567890123Z       ->  1.23Z
///  1.234567890123E+22    ->  12.34567890123Z       ->  12.3Z
///  1.234567890123E+23    ->  123.4567890123Z       ->  123Z
///  1.234567890123E+24    ->  1.234567890123Y       ->  1.23Y
///  1.234567890123E+25    ->  12.34567890123Y       ->  12.3Y
///  1.234567890123E+26    ->  123.4567890123Y       ->  123Y
///  1.234567890123E+27    ->  1.234567890123E+27    ->  1.23E+27
///  1.234567890123E+28    ->  12.34567890123E+27    ->  12.3E+27
/// </example>
/// <param name="d">the double to convert</param>
/// <param name="significantFigures">The number of significant figures</param>
/// <returns>A string</returns>
-2

To solve this problem, you want to create a class (call it Engineering) which inherits from Float on which you override the ToString() member.

Edit: Okay, I understand the issue now. Still, the solution is subclassing.

  • No, it's engineering notation. – Joey Robert Apr 30 '09 at 17:49
  • I don't think the reference is to distance necessarily. It just happened that he used an example with "m" which could be, say, milliseconds (ms), millimeters (mm), milliamps (mA), etc. – Scott W Apr 30 '09 at 17:50
  • The question is not about distances, it's about engineering notation for numbers; 1 mili = 0.001, 1 micro = 0.000001, 1 kilo = 1000, etc. – Kevin Laity Apr 30 '09 at 17:51
  • Gotcha; I think I was most confused by the "mu" symbol, which I have learned to read as "micron". :-) – Paul Sonier Apr 30 '09 at 18:00
  • 2
    Structs cannot be subclassed. A good approach is to do what highlycaffeinated said: Implement a formatter. Implement an extension method that returns a formatted string is also a good one. – Rafael Romão Apr 30 '09 at 19:49

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