8

Possible Duplicate:
Foreach can throw an InvalidCastException?

Consider the following block of code

public class Base
{
}

public class DerivedLeft : Base
{
}

public class DerivedRight : Base
{
}

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        List<Base> list = new List<Base> { new DerivedLeft(), new DerivedRight() };
        foreach (DerivedLeft dl in list)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(dl.ToString());
        }
    }
}

Notice the cast from Base to DerivedLeft in foreach statement. This compiles fine (Visual Studio 2010), without any error or even warning. Obviously, on the second loop-iteration we will get an InvalidCastException. If I was asked a question about reaction of compiler to such code, I would without a doubt say, that compiler won't let this go unnoticed and produce at least a warning. But apparently it doesn't. So, why does the compiler let this slip through?

marked as duplicate by CodeCaster, Ray, Heinzi, Adam Houldsworth, Anthony Pegram Nov 10 '11 at 15:10

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

5

It's doing an implicit cast. Check out this post on the same topic for an excellent explanation by Jon Skeet:

Foreach can throw an InvalidCastException?

2

Because list is of type List<Base> and the variable dl in the foreach loop is of type DerivedLeft which has Base as base class. So it can work during runtime, but it does not have to. The compiler isn't checking the initialization of your list.

  • I think the compiler does check the initialization ....e.g. if i put MyOtherClass there so there is a compile time exception – Royi Namir Nov 10 '11 at 15:07
  • @RoyiNamir: Yes, the compiler checks if the initialization is correct, but it doesn't check if only matching elements are in it when he reaches the foreach loop. – Fischermaen Nov 10 '11 at 15:09
  • correct............ – Royi Namir Nov 10 '11 at 15:10
  • It's only checking the initialization as far as DerivedLeft isa Base and DerivedRight isa Base. From the point of view of list they are all Base. – Dave Rager Nov 10 '11 at 15:12
0

Expecting the compiler to raise an error on this is like expecting it to raise an error on this:

Base b = new DerivedRight();
DerivedLeft d = (DerivedLeft)b;
  • in fact the compiler will raise an error on this, since you didn't provide the variable name for DerivedLeft :) – Trogvar Nov 10 '11 at 15:12
  • true .........:) – nogola Nov 10 '11 at 15:14
  • In fairness, the implicit cast involved in foreach isn't as obvious, unless one has coded with C# for .NET1.0 or 1.1, in which the lack of generics meant it would have been much more awkward not to have the implicit cast, as every foreach that didn't deal with object would have needed one. – Jon Hanna Jan 27 '14 at 10:03

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