Using Rails I'm trying to get an error message like "The song field can't be empty" on save. Doing the following:

validates_presence_of :song_rep_xyz, :message => "can't be empty"

... only displays "Song Rep XYW can't be empty", which is not good because the title of the field is not user friendly. How can I change the title of the field itself ? I could change the actual name of the field in the database, but I have multiple "song" fields and I do need to have specific field names.

I don't want to hack around rails' validation process and I feel there should be a way of fixing that.

15 Answers 15

up vote 384 down vote accepted

Now, the accepted way to set the humanized names and custom error messages is to use locales.

# config/locales/en.yml
en:
  activerecord:
    attributes:
      user:
        email: "E-mail address"
    errors:
      models:
        user:
          attributes:
            email:
              blank: "is required"

Now the humanized name and the presence validation message for the "email" attribute have been changed.

Validation messages can be set for a specific model+attribute, model, attribute, or globally.

  • 18
    If you are using mongoid, replace activerecord: with mongoid: – Intentss Nov 6 '11 at 14:07
  • 85
    @graywh: Where should questions about an answer be posted, if not in the comments? Here's the I18n guide: guides.rubyonrails.org/i18n.html – Tyler Rick Dec 15 '11 at 20:45
  • 4
    By the way: if you pass a symbol in for the message parameter of your validator in Rails 3.1.3, it will tell you the scope it was looking for as it won't e found, so you know exactly what to put in your locales yml. – aceofspades Feb 14 '12 at 5:46
  • 4
    Well, this is fine and all, but what if naively prepending the column name (no matter how human readable it is) would lead to completely f-uped grammar (especially in non-english languages)? Do I really need to use errors.add :base, msg? I'd like to know which column the error is about, so I can display it at the correct form field. – panzi Feb 27 '13 at 18:34
  • 5
    @graywh Maybe I'm missing something, but doesn't it always prepend the column name before the message? Even in English I'd like to have e.g. The password is wrong. or The email address is not valid. instead of Password is wrong. and Email is not valid.. – panzi Mar 10 '13 at 17:57

Try this.

class User < ActiveRecord::Base
  validate do |user|
    user.errors.add_to_base("Country can't be blank") if user.country_iso.blank?
  end
end

I found this here.

Here is another way to do it. What you do is define a human_attribute_name method on the model class. The method is passed the column name as a string and returns the string to use in validation messages.

class User < ActiveRecord::Base

  HUMANIZED_ATTRIBUTES = {
    :email => "E-mail address"
  }

  def self.human_attribute_name(attr)
    HUMANIZED_ATTRIBUTES[attr.to_sym] || super
  end

end

The above code is from here

  • The problem is that my field is called :song_rep_xyz (well, something complicated), which is not user friendly – marcgg Apr 30 '09 at 20:11
  • 15
    for Rails 3, "def self.human_attribute_name(attr)" needs to be changed into "def self.human_attribute_name(attr, options={})", otherwise it returns an error – spacemonkey Nov 24 '10 at 10:18
  • 3
    Thanks for this. I needed something that worked for Rails 2. (Yes, poor me... :) – Dan Barron Nov 26 '13 at 17:11

In your model:

validates_presence_of :address1, :message => "Put some address please" 

In your view

<% m.errors.each do |attr,msg|  %>
 <%=msg%>
<% end %>

If you do instead

<%=attr %> <%=msg %>

you get this error message with the attribute name

address1 Put some address please

if you want to get the error message for one single attribute

<%= @model.errors[:address1] %>
  • That's not an acceptable solution. What if I want the default behaviour for all the other attributes (attr + msg)? – Rômulo C Feb 20 '13 at 17:45
  • There you go.. you can play with those 2 things and make it work – Federico Feb 21 '13 at 18:44
  • Does not work for multi language apps – mahatmanich Sep 3 '15 at 13:08
  • You have to use a symbol so it will look up in your yml files, like validates_presence_of :address1, :message => :put_some_address_please – Federico Sep 4 '15 at 13:28
  • This is not acceptable, as the field name gets included – fatuhoku Nov 11 '16 at 15:22

Yes, there's a way to do this without the plugin! But it is not as clean and elegant as using the mentioned plugin. Here it is.

Assuming it's Rails 3 (I don't know if it's different in previous versions),

keep this in your model:

validates_presence_of :song_rep_xyz, :message => "can't be empty"

and in the view, instead of leaving

@instance.errors.full_messages

as it would be when we use the scaffold generator, put:

@instance.errors.first[1]

And you will get just the message you specified in the model, without the attribute name.

Explanation:

#returns an hash of messages, one element foreach field error, in this particular case would be just one element in the hash:
@instance.errors  # => {:song_rep_xyz=>"can't be empty"}

#this returns the first element of the hash as an array like [:key,"value"]
@instance.errors.first # => [:song_rep_xyz, "can't be empty"]

#by doing the following, you are telling ruby to take just the second element of that array, which is the message.
@instance.errors.first[1]

So far we are just displaying only one message, always for the first error. If you wanna display all errors you can loop in the hash and show the values.

Hope that helped.

Rails3 Code with fully localized messages:

In the model user.rb define the validation

validates :email, :presence => true

In config/locales/en.yml

en:  
  activerecord:
    models: 
      user: "Customer"
    attributes:
      user:
        email: "Email address"
    errors:
      models:
        user:
          attributes:
            email:
              blank: "cannot be empty"

In the custom validation method use:

errors.add(:base, "Custom error message")

as add_to_base has been deprecated.

errors.add_to_base("Custom error message")

I recommend installing the custom_error_message gem (or as a plugin) originally written by David Easley

It lets you do stuff like:

validates_presence_of :non_friendly_field_name, :message => "^Friendly field name is blank"
  • 2
    thanks! isn't there a way to do it without a plugin ? – marcgg Apr 30 '09 at 21:00
  • I have used this plugin in the past with great success though it does not appear to be regularly maintained anymore. – Jared Brown Jan 30 '11 at 16:48
  • 1
    you can alse install it as a gem for rails 3. just add gem "custom_error_message" to your Gemfile - see github for more details – Dorian May 2 '12 at 14:21
  • Exactly what I needed – olleicua Aug 31 '15 at 21:51
  • 2
    @DickieBoy I confirm that nanamkim's fork (github.com/nanamkim/custom-err-msg) works with Rails 5. It actually plays nice with the accepted answer. I'll write this up as a separate answer. – Rystraum Oct 26 '16 at 5:06

Related to the accepted answer and another answer down the list:

I'm confirming that nanamkim's fork of custom-err-msg works with Rails 5, and with the locale setup.

You just need to start the locale message with a caret and it shouldn't display the attribute name in the message.

A model defined as:

class Item < ApplicationRecord
  validates :name, presence: true
end

with the following en.yml:

en:
  activerecord:
    errors:
      models:
        item:
          attributes:
            name:
              blank: "^You can't create an item without a name."

item.errors.full_messages will display:

You can't create an item without a name

instead of the usual Name You can't create an item without a name

  • saved a life today. thanks – beydogan Jul 7 '17 at 15:25

Just do it the normal way:

validates_presence_of :email, :message => "Email is required."

But display it like this instead

<% if @user.errors.any? %>
  <% @user.errors.messages.each do |message| %>
    <div class="message"><%= message.last.last.html_safe %></div>
  <% end %>
<% end %>

Returns

"Email is required."

The localization method is definitely the "proper" way to do this, but if you're doing a little, non-global project and want to just get going fast - this is definitely easier than file hopping.

I like it for the ability to put the field name somewhere other than the beginning of the string:

validates_uniqueness_of :email, :message => "There is already an account with that email."

Here is another way:

If you use this template:

<% if @thing.errors.any? %>
  <ul>
    <% @thing.errors.full_messages.each do |message| %>
      <li><%= message %></li>
    <% end %>
  </ul>
<% end %>

You can write you own custom message like this:

class Thing < ActiveRecord::Base

  validate :custom_validation_method_with_message

  def custom_validation_method_with_message
    if some_model_attribute.blank?
      errors.add(:_, "My custom message")
    end
  end

This way, because of the underscore, the full message becomes " My custom message", but the extra space in the beginning is unnoticeable. If you really don't want that extra space at the beginning just add the .lstrip method.

<% if @thing.errors.any? %>
  <ul>
    <% @thing.errors.full_messages.each do |message| %>
      <li><%= message.lstrip %></li>
    <% end %>
  </ul>
<% end %>

The String.lstrip method will get rid of the extra space created by ':_' and will leave any other error messages unchanged.

Or even better, use the first word of your custom message as the key:

  def custom_validation_method_with_message
    if some_model_attribute.blank?
      errors.add(:my, "custom message")
    end
  end

Now the full message will be "My custom message" with no extra space.

If you want the full message to start with a word capitalized like "URL can't be blank" it cannot be done. Instead try adding some other word as the key:

  def custom_validation_method_with_message
    if some_model_attribute.blank?
      errors.add(:the, "URL can't be blank")
    end
  end

Now the full message will be "The URL can't be blank"

One solution might be to change the i18n default error format:

en:
  errors:
    format: "%{message}"

Default is format: %{attribute} %{message}

If you want to list them all in a nice list but without using the cruddy non human friendly name, you can do this...

object.errors.each do |attr,message|
  puts "<li>"+message+"</li>"
end

In your view

object.errors.each do |attr,msg|
  if msg.is_a? String
    if attr == :base
      content_tag :li, msg
    elsif msg[0] == "^"
      content_tag :li, msg[1..-1]
    else
      content_tag :li, "#{object.class.human_attribute_name(attr)} #{msg}"
    end
  end
end

When you want to override the error message without the attribute name, simply prepend the message with ^ like so:

validates :last_name,
  uniqueness: {
    scope: [:first_name, :course_id, :user_id],
    case_sensitive: false,
    message: "^This student has already been registered."
  }
  • does not work with rails 5.1 / ruby 2.4 ? getting the model name in that scope – Ben Jul 16 '17 at 11:23
  • @Ben Works for me on Rails 5.1.2, Ruby 2.4.1p111. Can you share your code? – luckyruby Jul 17 '17 at 13:20
  • i guess i had to look further, you can check the code and his answer there stackoverflow.com/q/45128434/102133 – Ben Jul 17 '17 at 13:54

I tried following, worked for me :)

1 job.rb

class Job < ApplicationRecord
    validates :description, presence: true
    validates :title, 
              :presence => true, 
              :length => { :minimum => 5, :message => "Must be at least 5 characters"}
end

2 jobs_controller.rb

def create
      @job = Job.create(job_params)
      if @job.valid?
        redirect_to jobs_path
      else
        render new_job_path
      end     
    end

3 _form.html.erb

<%= form_for @job do |f| %>
  <% if @job.errors.any? %>
    <h2>Errors</h2>
    <ul>
      <% @job.errors.full_messages.each do |message|%>
        <li><%= message %></li>
      <% end %>  
    </ul>
  <% end %>
  <div>
    <%= f.label :title %>
    <%= f.text_field :title %>
  </div>
  <div>
    <%= f.label :description %>
    <%= f.text_area :description, size: '60x6' %>

  </div>
  <div>
    <%= f.submit %>
  </div>
<% end %> 

Here is my code that can be useful for you in case you still need it: My model:

validates :director, acceptance: {message: "^Please confirm that you are a director of the company."}, on: :create, if: :is_director?

Then I have created a helper to show messages:

module ErrorHelper
  def error_messages!
    return "" unless error_messages?
    messages = resource.errors.full_messages.map { |msg|
       if msg.present? && !msg.index("^").nil?
         content_tag(:p, msg.slice((msg.index("^")+1)..-1))
       else
         content_tag(:p, msg)
       end
    }.join

    html = <<-HTML
      <div class="general-error alert show">
        #{messages}
      </div>
    HTML

    html.html_safe
  end

  def error_messages?
    !resource.errors.empty?
  end
end

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