59

I want to draw an arrow using the canvas tag, javascript. I've made it using the quadratic function, but I'm having problems to calculate the angle of rotation of the arrow...

Anyone have a clue on this?

Thank you

13 Answers 13

107

As simple as I can get it. You'll have to prepend context.beginPath() and append context.stroke() yourself:

ctx = document.getElementById("c").getContext("2d");
ctx.beginPath();
canvas_arrow(ctx, 10, 30, 200, 150);
canvas_arrow(ctx, 100, 200, 400, 50);
canvas_arrow(ctx, 200, 30, 10, 150);
canvas_arrow(ctx, 400, 200, 100, 50);
ctx.stroke();


function canvas_arrow(context, fromx, fromy, tox, toy) {
  var headlen = 10; // length of head in pixels
  var dx = tox - fromx;
  var dy = toy - fromy;
  var angle = Math.atan2(dy, dx);
  context.moveTo(fromx, fromy);
  context.lineTo(tox, toy);
  context.lineTo(tox - headlen * Math.cos(angle - Math.PI / 6), toy - headlen * Math.sin(angle - Math.PI / 6));
  context.moveTo(tox, toy);
  context.lineTo(tox - headlen * Math.cos(angle + Math.PI / 6), toy - headlen * Math.sin(angle + Math.PI / 6));
}
<html>

<body>
  <canvas id="c" width="500" height="500"></canvas>


</body>

5
  • 1
    That produces an odd shape, you want to get rid of that last move and add at the end lineTo(tox,toy)
    – owook
    Jan 17 '12 at 15:08
  • 1
    function doesnt work well when lineWidth is not == 1 Nov 15 '13 at 14:26
  • 6
    For larger line widths, just add context.moveTo(tox, toy); after context.lineTo(tox, toy); (see: i.imgur.com/jMOsLM9.png)
    – danharper
    Aug 12 '14 at 12:54
  • @danharper is the image a canvas arrow? looks rounded, if so how do you do that?
    – raklos
    Aug 28 '14 at 16:04
  • 1
    @raklos context.lineCap = 'round' should do it.
    – danharper
    Aug 29 '14 at 17:26
32

Ok, so the first answer on this page helped me greatly when I was trying to figure this problem out myself, although as someone else already stated, if you have a line width greater than 1px you get funny shapes. The fix that someone else suggested almost worked, but I still had some issues when trying to go for a thicker width arrow. After several hours of playing around with it I was able to combine the above solution with some of my own tinkering to come up with the following code that will draw an arrow at whatever thickness you desire without distorting the arrow shape.

function drawArrow(fromx, fromy, tox, toy){
                //variables to be used when creating the arrow
                var c = document.getElementById("myCanvas");
                var ctx = c.getContext("2d");
                const width = 22;
                var headlen = 10;
                // This makes it so the end of the arrow head is located at tox, toy, don't ask where 1.15 comes from
                tox -= Math.cos(angle) * ((width*1.15));
                toy -= Math.sin(angle) * ((width*1.15));

                var angle = Math.atan2(toy-fromy,tox-fromx);
                
                //starting path of the arrow from the start square to the end square and drawing the stroke
                ctx.beginPath();
                ctx.moveTo(fromx, fromy);
                ctx.lineTo(tox, toy);
                ctx.strokeStyle = "#cc0000";
                ctx.lineWidth = width;
                ctx.stroke();
                
                //starting a new path from the head of the arrow to one of the sides of the point
                ctx.beginPath();
                ctx.moveTo(tox, toy);
                ctx.lineTo(tox-headlen*Math.cos(angle-Math.PI/7),toy-headlen*Math.sin(angle-Math.PI/7));
                
                //path from the side point of the arrow, to the other side point
                ctx.lineTo(tox-headlen*Math.cos(angle+Math.PI/7),toy-headlen*Math.sin(angle+Math.PI/7));
                
                //path from the side point back to the tip of the arrow, and then again to the opposite side point
                ctx.lineTo(tox, toy);
                ctx.lineTo(tox-headlen*Math.cos(angle-Math.PI/7),toy-headlen*Math.sin(angle-Math.PI/7));

                //draws the paths created above
                ctx.strokeStyle = "#cc0000";
                ctx.lineWidth = width;
                ctx.stroke();
                ctx.fillStyle = "#cc0000";
                ctx.fill();
            }

This is now the code that I am using in my program. What I found to be the key with eliminating the distortion issue was continuing the stroke from the tip of the arrow to one side point, to the other side point, back to the tip, and back over to the first side point, then doing a fill. This corrected the shape of the arrow.

Hope this helps!

3
  • 1
    I am not able to locate the exact point of arrow head in the solution. Do you have any idea of this? May 9 '20 at 8:49
  • I never got that into the weeds with the code. I basically just played with dimensions until it looked correct after I drew the arrow. Sorry I don't have a better answer for you. :\ Jul 16 '20 at 23:03
  • Modify the function by adding these two lines after var angle = Math.atan2(toy-fromy,tox-fromx);, tox -= Math.cos(angle) * ((width*1.15)); toy -= Math.sin(angle) * ((width*1.15)); This will make it so the arrow head ends at tox and toy. @CodingbyRaj
    – ICW
    Oct 19 '20 at 18:30
16

Here is another method to draw arrows. It uses the triangle method from here: https://stackoverflow.com/a/8937325/1828637

A little helper function.

function canvas_arrow(context, fromx, fromy, tox, toy, r){
    var x_center = tox;
    var y_center = toy;

    var angle;
    var x;
    var y;

    context.beginPath();

    angle = Math.atan2(toy-fromy,tox-fromx)
    x = r*Math.cos(angle) + x_center;
    y = r*Math.sin(angle) + y_center;

    context.moveTo(x, y);

    angle += (1/3)*(2*Math.PI)
    x = r*Math.cos(angle) + x_center;
    y = r*Math.sin(angle) + y_center;

    context.lineTo(x, y);

    angle += (1/3)*(2*Math.PI)
    x = r*Math.cos(angle) + x_center;
    y = r*Math.sin(angle) + y_center;

    context.lineTo(x, y);

    context.closePath();

    context.fill();
}

And here is a demonstration of it to draw arrows at the start and at the end of a line.

var can = document.getElementById('c');
var ctx = can.getContext('2d');

ctx.lineWidth = 10;
ctx.strokeStyle = 'steelblue';
ctx.fillStyle = 'steelbllue'; // for the triangle fill
ctx.lineJoin = 'butt';

ctx.beginPath();
ctx.moveTo(50, 50);
ctx.lineTo(150, 150);
ctx.stroke();

canvas_arrow(ctx, 50, 50, 150, 150, 10);
canvas_arrow(ctx, 150, 150, 50, 50, 10);

function canvas_arrow(context, fromx, fromy, tox, toy, r){
	var x_center = tox;
	var y_center = toy;
	
	var angle;
	var x;
	var y;
	
	context.beginPath();
	
	angle = Math.atan2(toy-fromy,tox-fromx)
	x = r*Math.cos(angle) + x_center;
	y = r*Math.sin(angle) + y_center;

	context.moveTo(x, y);
	
	angle += (1/3)*(2*Math.PI)
	x = r*Math.cos(angle) + x_center;
	y = r*Math.sin(angle) + y_center;
	
	context.lineTo(x, y);
	
	angle += (1/3)*(2*Math.PI)
	x = r*Math.cos(angle) + x_center;
	y = r*Math.sin(angle) + y_center;
	
	context.lineTo(x, y);
	
	context.closePath();
	
	context.fill();
}
<canvas id="c" width=300 height=300></canvas>

2
  • Why would you use (1/3)*(2*Math.PI) and not just Math.PI / 1.5? It gives the exact same result but in less operations.
    – NKCSS
    Oct 3 '19 at 9:34
  • The tip is offset (it centers around the line end instead of exactly pointing onto it), but adding x_center -= r * Math.cos(angle); y_center -= r * Math.sin(angle); after the first angle calculation fixes that. Jun 4 '20 at 12:40
8

You can do:

ctx.save();
ctx.translate(xOrigin, yOrigin);
ctx.rotate(angle);
 // draw your arrow, with its origin at [0, 0]
ctx.restore();
5

var canvas = document.getElementById('canvas');
var ctx = canvas.getContext('2d');

ctx.clearRect(0, 0, canvas.width, canvas.height);	
arrow({x: 10, y: 10}, {x: 100, y: 170}, 10);
arrow({x: 40, y: 250}, {x: 10, y: 70}, 5);


function arrow (p1, p2, size) {
  var angle = Math.atan2((p2.y - p1.y) , (p2.x - p1.x));
  var hyp = Math.sqrt((p2.x - p1.x) * (p2.x - p1.x) + (p2.y - p1.y) * (p2.y - p1.y));

  ctx.save();
  ctx.translate(p1.x, p1.y);
  ctx.rotate(angle);

  // line
  ctx.beginPath();	
  ctx.moveTo(0, 0);
  ctx.lineTo(hyp - size, 0);
  ctx.stroke();

  // triangle
  ctx.fillStyle = 'blue';
  ctx.beginPath();
  ctx.lineTo(hyp - size, size);
  ctx.lineTo(hyp, 0);
  ctx.lineTo(hyp - size, -size);
  ctx.fill();

  ctx.restore();
}
<canvas id = "canvas" width = "300" height = "400"></canvas>

1
  • 1
    Thank you sir you helped me out greatly worked great with what I needed Jun 1 '18 at 19:58
5

Typescript version, with the fixed arrow tip when line width >> 1

function canvas_arrow( context, fromx, fromy, tox, toy ) {
    const dx = tox - fromx;
    const dy = toy - fromy;
    const headlen = Math.sqrt( dx * dx + dy * dy ) * 0.3; // length of head in pixels
    const angle = Math.atan2( dy, dx );
    context.beginPath();
    context.moveTo( fromx, fromy );
    context.lineTo( tox, toy );
    context.stroke();
    context.beginPath();
    context.moveTo( tox - headlen * Math.cos( angle - Math.PI / 6 ), toy - headlen * Math.sin( angle - Math.PI / 6 ) );
    context.lineTo( tox, toy );
    context.lineTo( tox - headlen * Math.cos( angle + Math.PI / 6 ), toy - headlen * Math.sin( angle + Math.PI / 6 ) );
    context.stroke();
}

enter image description here

2
  • Best answer, I think. You say TypeScript, but I don't see any type declarations? This worked without modifications in plain JS.
    – Roger Dahl
    Mar 4 '21 at 5:44
  • 1
    @RogerDahl I meant that it compiles with tsc right away so you can use it immediately in a .ts file. Mar 4 '21 at 7:00
4

Given a size and the starting position, following code will draw the arrow for you.

function draw_arrow(context, startX, startY, size) {
  var arrowX = startX + 0.75 * size;
  var arrowTopY = startY - 0.707 * (0.25 * size);
  var arrowBottomY = startY + 0.707 * (0.25 * size);
  context.moveTo(startX, startY);
  context.lineTo(startX + size, startX);
  context.lineTo(arrowX, arrowTopY);
  context.moveTo(startX + size, startX);
  context.lineTo(arrowX, arrowBottomY);
  context.stroke();
}
window.onload = function() {
  var canvas = document.getElementById("myCanvas");
  var context = canvas.getContext("2d");
  var startX = 50;
  var startY = 50;
  var size = 100;
  context.lineWidth = 2;
  draw_arrow(context, startX, startY, size);
};
body {
  margin: 0px;
  padding: 0px;
}

#myCanvas {
  border: 1px solid #9C9898;
}
<!DOCTYPE HTML>
<html>

<body onmousedown="return false;">
  <canvas id="myCanvas" width="578" height="200"></canvas>
</body>

</html>

2

This code is similar to Titus Cieslewski's solution, maybe the arrow is a bit nicer:

function canvasDrawArrow(context, fromx, fromy, tox, toy) {
    var headlen = 10.0;
    var back = 4.0;
    var angle1 = Math.PI / 13.0;
    var angle2 = Math.atan2(toy - fromy, tox - fromx);
    var diff1 = angle2 - angle1;
    var diff2 = angle2 + angle1;
    var xx = getBack(back, fromx, fromy, tox, toy);
    var yy = getBack(back, fromy, fromx, toy, tox);

    context.moveTo(fromx, fromy);
    context.lineTo(tox, toy);

    context.moveTo(xx, yy);
    context.lineTo(xx - headlen * Math.cos(diff1), yy - headlen * Math.sin(diff1));

    context.moveTo(xx, yy);
    context.lineTo(xx - headlen * Math.cos(diff2), yy - headlen * Math.sin(diff2));
}

function getBack(len, x1, y1, x2, y2) {
    return x2 - (len * (x2 - x1) / (Math.sqrt(Math.pow(y2 - y1, 2) + Math.pow(x2 - x1, 2))));
}

this works well with lineWidth > 1. It can come in handy when drawing x and y axis

1
function RTEShape()
{   
    this.x = 50;
  this.y = 50;
  this.w = 100; // default width and height?
  this.h = 100;
  this.fill = '#444444';
  this.text = "Test String";
  this.type;
  this.color;
  this.size = 6;    

    // The selection color and width. Right now we have a red selection with a small width
    this.mySelColor = '#CC0000';
    this.mySelWidth = 2;
    this.mySelBoxColor = 'darkred';// New for selection boxes
    this.mySelBoxSize = 6;
}

RTEShape.prototype.buildArrow = function(canvas)
{
    this.type = "arrow";

  // Make sure we don't execute when canvas isn't supported
  if (canvas.getContext){

    // use getContext to use the canvas for drawing
    var ctx = canvas.getContext('2d');           

    var oneThirdX = this.x + (this.w/3);             
    var twoThirdX = this.x + ((this.w*2)/3);

    var oneFifthY = this.y - (this.y/5);    
    var twoFifthY = this.y - ((this.y*3)/5);

    /**/
    //ctx.beginPath();
    ctx.moveTo(oneThirdX,this.y); // 125,125
    ctx.lineTo(oneThirdX,oneFifthY); // 125,105

    ctx.lineTo(this.x*2,oneFifthY); // 225,105      
    ctx.lineTo(this.x*2,twoFifthY); // 225,65

    ctx.lineTo(oneThirdX,twoFifthY); // 125,65      
    ctx.lineTo(oneThirdX,(this.y/5)); // 125,45

    ctx.lineTo(this.x,(this.y+(this.y/5))/2); // 45,85

        ctx.fillStyle = "green";
    ctx.fill();

    ctx.fillStyle = "yellow";
    ctx.fillRect(this.x,this.y,this.w,this.h);

  } else {
    alert('Error on buildArrow!\n'+err.description);
  }
}
1

Hello and thank you very much for your suggestions.

May I suggest you drop the cumbersome atan ? You may as well use linear algebra to add or subtract angles:

var cospix=0.866025404; //cosinus of pi/6

function canvas_arrow(context, fromx, fromy, tox, toy) {
ctx.strokeStyle = '#AA0000';
var headlen = 10; // length of head in pixels
var dx = tox - fromx;
var dy = toy - fromy;
var length = Math.sqrt(dy*dy + dx*dx); //length of arrow
var sina = dy/length, cosa = dx/length; //computing sin and cos of arrow angle
var cosp=cosa*cospix-0.5*sina, cosm=cosa*cospix+0.5*sina,
sinp=cosa*0.5+cospix*sina, sinm=cospix*sina-cosa*0.5;
//computing cos and sin of arrow angle plus pi/6, respectively minus pi/6
//(p for plus, m for minus at the end of variable's names)
context.moveTo(fromx, fromy);
context.lineTo(tox, toy);
context.lineTo(tox - headlen * cosm, toy - headlen * sinm); //computing coordinates using the cos and sin computed above
context.moveTo(tox, toy);
context.lineTo(tox - headlen * cosp, toy - headlen * sinp); //computing coordinates using the cos and sin computed above
}
0

You can push your matrix, rotate it, draw your arrow and then pop the matrix.

0

I've been struggeling with this for quite some time now. I needed to to this in both javascript and c#. For javascript i found a nice library jCanvas.

My main problem was drawing nicely looking arrow heads, which jCanvas does perfectly. For my c# project i reverse engineered the jCanvas code.

Hopefully this helps somebody

0

Here is the working solution

function draw_arrow(ctx,fx,fy,tx,ty){ //ctx is the context
    var angle=Math.atan2(ty-fy,tx-fx);
    ctx.moveTo(fx,fy); ctx.lineTo(tx,ty);
    var w=3.5; //width of arrow to one side. 7 pixels wide arrow is pretty
    ctx.strokeStyle="#4d4d4d"; ctx.fillStyle="#4d4d4d";
    angle=angle+Math.PI/2; tx=tx+w*Math.cos(angle); ty=ty+w*Math.sin(angle);
    ctx.lineTo(tx,ty);
  //Drawing an isosceles triangle of sides proportional to 2:7:2
    angle=angle-1.849096; tx=tx+w*3.5*Math.cos(angle); ty=ty+w*3.5*Math.sin(angle);
    ctx.lineTo(tx,ty);
    angle=angle-2.584993; tx=tx+w*3.5*Math.cos(angle); ty=ty+w*3.5*Math.sin(angle);
    ctx.lineTo(tx,ty);
    angle=angle-1.849096; tx=tx+w*Math.cos(angle); ty=ty+w*Math.sin(angle);
    ctx.lineTo(tx,ty);
    ctx.stroke(); ctx.fill();
}

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