28

EnumerableObject : IEnumerable<Foo>

wraps a List<Foo>

If EnumerableObject a.SequenceEquals( EnumerableObject b), then they are equal.

Therefore, a GetHashCode must be implemented. The problem is XORing each element in the list will return the same hash code for any list with all and only the same elements, regardless of order. This is Okay in terms of it working, but will result in many collisions, which will slow down retrieval, etc.

What is a good, fast GetHashCode method for lists of objects that is order dependent?

  • 2
    Are you sure you want to re-define Equality for a List? It's very rarely a good idea. – Henk Holterman Nov 11 '11 at 14:03
  • I didn't find where the documentation says that GetHashCode is to be implemented if SequenceEqual is implemented. Are you sure this is needed at all? – Vlad Nov 11 '11 at 14:24
  • 1
    @Vlad It doesn't. I read the question as saying they've defined equality as SequenceEquals entails equality, and want to match that in their hashcode. – Jon Hanna Nov 11 '11 at 16:07
  • My previous comment assumes that the list and the items in the list don't change after the list is created. – Jim Mischel Jun 20 '14 at 2:36
  • consider List<T> wouldnt this produce the same value for two lists which just differ by the order of the elements ? – kofifus Jul 14 '18 at 8:51
59

I'd do it the same way I normally combine hash codes - with an addition and a multiplication:

public override int GetHashCode()
{
    unchecked
    {
        int hash = 19;
        foreach (var foo in foos)
        {
            hash = hash * 31 + foo.GetHashCode();
        }
        return hash;
    }
}

(Note that you shouldn't add anything to the list after this has been used for the key in a hash table of any description, as the hash will change. This also assumes that there are no null entries - if there could be, you need to take account of that.)

  • 3
    Strange enough, List<T>'s implementation of GetHashCode is just inherited from object. – Vlad Nov 11 '11 at 13:57
  • 7
    Because List<T> equality is not sequence equality. – Ben B. Nov 11 '11 at 14:20
  • 9
    This may sound retarded, but may I ask why "19" and "31"? – MK_Dev Nov 27 '12 at 0:21
  • 4
    @MK_Dev: Well, they're both primes, which generally helps. I'll confess to not understanding the maths behind why this hash generally works well. Multiplication by 31 is easily optimizable to a shift and a subtraction, which makes it attractive. There's a page explaining this kind of hash somewhere around, but I can't remember where, I'm afraid :( – Jon Skeet Nov 27 '12 at 6:44
  • 3
    @Jon You're probably referring to this page, which you mentioned in this answer. – David Schwartz Dec 2 '13 at 20:18
12

Firstly, double-check that you need a hashcode at all. Are you going to be putting these lists into a hash-mapped structure (e.g. dictionary, hashset, etc)? If not, forget about it.

Now, assuming that you mean that EnumerableObject already overrides Equals(object) (and hopefully therefore also implements IEquatable<EnumerableObject>) for some reason, then this is indeed necessary. You want to balance speed versus bit distribution.

A good starting point is a mult+add or a shift+xor like:

public override int GetHashCode()
{
    int res = 0x2D2816FE;
    foreach(var item in this)
    {
        res = res * 31 + (item == null ? 0 : item.GetHashCode());
    }
    return res;
}

(This assumes that you are using item.Equals() for your sequence equality comparison, if you're using an IEqualityComparer's equals you'll need to call into its hashcode).

From there we can optimise.

If null items are disallowed, remove the null-check (be careful, this will make the code throw if it ever does find a null).

If very large lists are common we need to reduce the number examined, while trying not to result in lots of collisions. Compare the following different implementations:

public override int GetHashCode()
{
    int res = 0x2D2816FE;
    int max = Math.Min(Count, 16);
    for(int i = 0, i != max; ++i)
    {
        var item = this[i];
        res = res * 31 + (item == null ? 0 : item.GetHashCode());
    }
    return res;
}

public override int GetHashCode()
{
    int res = 0x2D2816FE;
    int min = Math.Max(-1, Count - 16);
    for(int i = Count -1, i != min; --i)
    {
        var item = this[i];
        res = res * 31 + (item == null ? 0 : item.GetHashCode());
    }
    return res;
}

public override int GetHashCode()
{
    int res = 0x2D2816FE;
    int step = Count / 16 + 1;
    for(int i = 0, i < Count; i += step)
    {
        var item = this[i];
        res = res * 31 + (item == null ? 0 : item.GetHashCode());
    }
    return res;
}

Each of these restrict the total number of items examined, which speeds execution but risks poorer quality hashes. Which (if any) is best depends on whether collections with the same start or the same end are more likely.

Changing the number 16 above adjusts the balance; smaller is faster but higher is better hash quality with a lower risk of hash collisions.

Edit: And now you can use my implementation of SpookyHash v. 2:

public override int GetHashCode()
{
  var hasher = new SpookyHash();//use methods with seeds if you need to prevent HashDos
  foreach(var item in this)
    hasher.Update(item.GetHashCode());//or relevant feeds of item, etc.
  return hasher.Final().GetHashCode();
}

This will create a much better distribution than mult+add or shift+xor, while also being particularly fast (especially in 64-bit processes as the algorithm is optimised for that, though it works well on 32-bit too).

  • 1
    Can you explain where 0x2D2816FE came from? Google suggests this is .Net's hash code for an empty string, but I am not sure why that would be a good starting value. Jon Skeet's answer used 19 in a similar way, but I don't understand that either. – Chris Nielsen Sep 16 '13 at 20:31
  • 1
    @ChrisNielsen it's arbitary, and yes I just borrowed from that use. The main thing is that it shouldn't be zero so a to have a different code for an empty list and for null (most uses will assign zero to null objects) as those are two particularly common cases. – Jon Hanna Sep 17 '13 at 8:36
  • 1
    @JonHanna you would want a unchecked scope for GetHashCode there. – nawfal Nov 9 '13 at 8:44
  • If the list will never be mutated, the time to hash everything once will be a fixed multiple of the time spent building the list. I would favor hashing every item but caching the hash value. If the list will support limited forms of mutation (e.g. Add only), it may be possible to maintain an incrementally-updated hash value as the list grows. Also, in many cases I'd suggest keeping more than 32 bits of state within the hashing loop, and rendering the result to 32 bits at the end. That will help reduce the danger of "systematic" collisions. – supercat Jan 7 '14 at 19:38
  • @supercat almost all uses of GetHashCode() will memoise the hash obtained, making the value of caching it within the method limited. – Jon Hanna Jan 7 '14 at 20:33
4

The .GetHashCode() method usually just returns a hash based on the object reference (pointer address). This is because calculating the hash code of every item in an enumerable list can be very time intensive. Instead of overwriting the existing behaviour, I prefer to use an extension method and use it only where the hash code needs to be deterministically determined:

public static class EnumerableExtensions
{
    public static int GetSequenceHashCode<TItem>(this IEnumerable<TItem> list)
    {
        if (list == null) return 0;
        const int seedValue = 0x2D2816FE;
        const int primeNumber = 397;
        return list.Aggregate(seedValue, (current, item) => (current * primeNumber) + (Equals(item, default(TItem)) ? 0 : item.GetHashCode()));
    }
}

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.