1

Global scope allows you to use a variable in a function that was defined outside the function. eg

$a=1;
function $test(){
echo $a;
}

//outputs 1

but why is it that if I define a variable with an array I cannot use it the same way?

$test = array(
0=>'zero', 
1=>'one', 
2=>'two',
3=>'three', 
);

function doesntWork($something){
echo "My favorite number is " . $test[$something]; 
}

//outputs My favorite number is 0

How do i pass the array into the function without having to recopy the array into the function itself.

any explanation would be appreciated thanks

4

script #1 is not correct. neither does it work (function **$**test() {...}), nor does it output "1". and globals ARE bad practice. wrapping them in a class got nothing to do with it. classes are not a solution for random problems not related to object orientation.

just pass $a as a parameter:

<?php 
  $a=1; 
  function test($foo) { 
    echo 'number ' . $foo; 
  }; 

  test($a);
  // -> "number 1". 
 ?>

script #2:

<?php
  $test = array(
    0=>'zero', 
    1=>'one', 
    2=>'two',
    3=>'three', 
  );

  function doesntWork($test, $something){
    echo "My favorite number is " . $test[$something]; 
  }

  doesntWork($test, mt_rand(0,3));
?>
  • ok so you need to redefine the array inside the function? I asked about classes because ive seen people use public variable with OOP and only define variables once. Im looking for best practises thanks – chris May 1 '09 at 0:31
  • thanks thats exactly what i needed. I ended up doing it with OOP class works{ var $a; function favNum{echo $this->a;} } – chris May 1 '09 at 1:34
  • I love this answer's first paragraph! – Rudie Apr 12 '11 at 17:49
  • The & notation should be used when you want to copy-by-reference instead of copy-by-value in PHP. See php.net/manual/en/language.references.pass.php for more information. – Jakob Pogulis Mar 30 '13 at 6:35
3

Your first example should not output 1. The only way to make variables global in a particular function is to use the global keyword like this:

function test() {
    global $a;
    echo $a;
}

function doesWork($something) {
    global $test;
    echo "My favorite number is " . $test[$something]; 
}

More info here: http://ca2.php.net/manual/en/language.variables.scope.php

  • i heard using globals all the time is bad practise... should I wrapping them in a class? – chris Apr 30 '09 at 23:58
0

PHP doesn't have implicit global scoping; you must use the the global keyword to access "global" variables.

$a outputting 1 is probably due to an intricacy of PHP's dubious handling of variables.

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