45

While refactoring some code, I came across this strange compile error:

The constructor call needs to be dynamically dispatched, but cannot be because it is part of a constructor initializer. Consider casting the dynamic arguments.

It seems to occur when trying to call base methods/constructors that take dynamic arguments. For example:

class ClassA
{
    public ClassA(dynamic test)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("ClassA");
    }
}

class ClassB : ClassA
{
    public ClassB(dynamic test)
        : base(test)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("ClassB");
    }
}

It works if I cast the argument to object, like this:

public ClassB(dynamic test)
    : base((object)test)

So, I'm a little confused. Why do I have to put this nasty cast in - why can't the compiler figure out what I mean?

43

The constructor chain has to be determined for certain at compile-time - the compiler has to pick an overload so that it can create valid IL. Whereas normally overload resolution (e.g. for method calls) can be deferred until execution time, that doesn't work for chained constructor calls.

EDIT: In "normal" C# code (before C# 4, basically), all overload resolution is performed at compile-time. However, when a member invocation involves a dynamic value, that is resolved at execution time. For example consider this:

using System;

class Program
{
    static void Foo(int x)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("int!");
    }

    static void Foo(string x)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("string!");
    }

    static void Main(string[] args)  
    {
        dynamic d = 10;
        Foo(d);
    }
}

The compiler doesn't emit a direct call to Foo here - it can't, because in the call Foo(d) it doesn't know which overload it would resolve to. Instead it emits code which does a sort of "just in time" mini-compilation to resolve the overload with the actual type of the value of d at execution time.

Now that doesn't work for constructor chaining, as valid IL has to contain a call to a specific base class constructor. (I don't know whether the dynamic version can't even be expressed in IL, or whether it can, but the result would be unverifiable.)

You could argue that the C# compiler should be able to tell that there's only actually one visible constructor which can be called, and that constructor will always be available... but once you start down that road, you end up with a language which is very complicated to specify. The C# designers usually take the position of having simpler rules which occasionally aren't as powerful as you'd like them to be.

  • 2
    Great, thanks for the info! I'd forgotten that with dynamic the overload resolution was at runtime (despite taking advantage of that in this same project!). This error also occurs with base method calls, so this seems to be base-related rather than constructor-related. Any thoughts on why this couldn't also be done at runtime? – Danny Tuppeny Nov 11 '11 at 20:43
  • @DannyTuppeny: Interesting about also happening with base method calls. That may be because they're called non-virtually. I suspect that calling a virtual method non-virtually may only be able to be done within the IL of the instance of the subclass the non-virtual method call is being made on, for encapsulation reasons. As the DLR would want to call the method non-virtually from arbitrary code, that would be a problem. – Jon Skeet Nov 11 '11 at 20:47
  • I can also see why you wouldn't want to allow constructor chaining within a class (i.e. this(...)) to be dynamic - you can't verify that it'll ever complete. Basically, there are a bunch of rules which sound entirely reasonable when you're thinking of a statically typed language, but which make less sense in a dynamic context :) – Jon Skeet Nov 11 '11 at 20:48

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