4

If I have a nullable "decimal? d" and I want to assign d to non nullable e, what is the proper way?

16
decimal e = d ?? 0.0;
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  • Love the null coalescing operator. This expands to 'decimal e = d != null ? d : 0.0;' – Matt Mitchell May 1 '09 at 3:18
  • Exactly, to me this is short and sweet and allows you to treat the nullable type succinctly. You don't have to worry about using the .HasValue or .Value properties either. – Ralph Caraveo May 1 '09 at 3:21
  • Echoing other comments - this is the way to do it. – Chuck May 1 '09 at 3:31
10
decimal e;
if(d.HasValue) 
{
    e = d.Value;
}
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  • 1
    -1 for declaring a variable that will go out of scope after you assign to it. – Mike Cole May 1 '09 at 3:06
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    That's not a reason to downvote. It answers the question, and if someone doesn't know that e needs to be declared outside an if block, they have bigger problems than Nullable types. – BFree May 1 '09 at 3:14
  • (You'd notice his error quickly, you wouldn't notice possible System.InvalidOperationExceptions as quickly). – Matt Mitchell May 1 '09 at 3:14
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    Edited to move 'decimal e;' declaration outside the scope (all correct now). – Matt Mitchell May 1 '09 at 3:16
2

You need to determine whether you even can, i.e. whether the nullable d has a value or not.

if (d.HasValue) { e = d.Value; } else { /* now what */ }

Another interesting case comes up quite commonly where you want to assign to a nullable using a ternary, in which case you have to cast to make both branches have the same type.

d = foo ? 45 : (int?)null;

Note the case of null to (int?) so that both branches have the same type.

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  • Good point on the ternary operator thing. Always kind of annoyed me I have to cast null to a type here :-) – Matt Mitchell May 1 '09 at 3:16
1
decimal e;

if (d.HasValue)
{
    e = d.Value;
}
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  • 1
    and what value should e take when d is null? – Sebastian Good May 1 '09 at 3:06
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    I could say -1 for possible 'System.InvalidOperationException' but i wont. – Phaedrus May 1 '09 at 3:09
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    This answer is right now, but only after copying Phaedrus' answer. – Matt Mitchell May 1 '09 at 3:13
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    Jeez, don't get so testy Graphain. I fixed my invalid code. And nice catch, Phaedrus. I rushed my answer. – Mike Cole May 1 '09 at 3:17
  • And technically, I didn't copy the answer. – Mike Cole May 1 '09 at 3:20
1

I usually go with something like this:

decimal e = d.HasValue ? d.Value : decimal.Zero;

The reason here is that I'm a fan of ternary operations and I usually assign the value I would get if I had perfermed a failed TryParse() for the type I am dealing with. For decimal that would be decimal.Zero, for int it would be 0 as well.

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