42

I've attempted to compile, but every time I do, one method throws a strange "expected a type" error. I have a method in the header:

-(ANObject *)generateSomethingForSomethingElse:(NSString *)somethingElse;

The error points at the return type for this method. I've imported ANObject into the header using #import "ANObject.h" and ANObject is compiling fine..

Why is this happening?

  • seems to be fine.. can you post a part of your code? – Devarshi Nov 12 '11 at 16:19
  • also ... is ANObject part of some other framework? – Devarshi Nov 12 '11 at 16:19
  • 4
    Please edit your question to include both the contents of ANObject.h and the header that's giving you the problem. And please show your actual code, not made-up code that may not include the problem. – Peter Hosey Nov 12 '11 at 16:31
93

This is to do with the order that the source files are compiled in. You are already probably aware that you can't call a method before it is defined (see below pseudocode):

var value = someMethod();

function someMethod()
{
    ...
}

This would cause a compile-time error because someMethod() has not yet been defined. The same is true of classes. Classes are compiled one after the other by the compiler.

So, if you imagine all the classes being put into a giant file before compilation, you might be able to already see the issue. Let's look at the Ship and BoatYard class:

@interface BoatYard : NSObject
@property (nonatomic, retain) Ship* currentShip;
@end

@interface Ship : NSObject
@property (nonatomic, retain) NSString* name;
@property (nonatomic, assign) float weight;
@end

Once again, because the Ship class has not yet been defined, we can't refer to it yet. Solving this particular problem is pretty simple; change the compilation order and compile. I'm sure you're familliar with this screen in XCode:

But are you aware that you can drag the files up and down in the list? This changes the order that the files will be compiled in. Therefore, just move the Ship class above the BoatYard class, and all is good.

But, what if you don't want to do that, or more importantly, what if there is a circular relationship between the two objects? Let's increase the complexity of that object diagram by adding a reference to the current BoatYard that the Ship is in:

@interface BoatYard : NSObject
@property (nonatomic, retain) Ship* currentShip;
@end

@interface Ship : NSObject
@property (nonatomic, retain) BoatYard* currentBoatYard;
@property (nonatomic, retain) NSString* name;
@property (nonatomic, assign) float weight;
@end

Oh dear, now we have a problem. These two can't be compiled side-by-side. We need a way to inform the compiler that the Ship* class really does exist. And this is why the @class keyword is so handy.

To put it in layman's terms, you're saying, "Trust me man, Ship really does exist, and you'll see it really soon". To put it all together:

@class Ship;

@interface BoatYard : NSObject
@property (nonatomic, retain) Ship* currentShip;
@end

@interface Ship : NSObject
@property (nonatomic, retain) BoatYard* currentBoatYard;
@property (nonatomic, retain) NSString* name;
@property (nonatomic, assign) float weight;
@end

Now the compiler knows as it compiles BoatYard, that a Ship class definition will soon appear. Of course, if it doesn't, the compilation will still succeed.

All the @class keyword does however is inform the compiler that the class will soon come along. It is not a replacement for #import. You still must import the header file, or you will not have access to any of the class internals:

@class Ship

-(void) example
{
    Ship* newShip = [[Ship alloc] init];
}

This cannot work, and will fail with an error message saying that Ship is a forward declaration. Once you #import "Ship.h", then you will be able to create the instance of the object.

  • Steve, can you explain the reason why this happens? cheers – theiOSDude Sep 7 '12 at 14:14
  • 2
    @burrows111: Upon reflection, that's a pretty lazy answer; I must have been in a hurry when I wrote it. The other answers explain how to solve it, but I can't see one that explains why it happens. I hope that the edited answer helps you. – Steve Rukuts Sep 7 '12 at 15:10
  • makes alot more sense! cheers buddy! – theiOSDude Sep 11 '12 at 9:37
  • This helped me, Thanks man! – NJGUY Feb 15 '15 at 22:56
  • Man, you'd think a language like Obj-C has this solved. It's not the first time I hit this and I'm always surprised about it. – Zoltán Jul 8 '16 at 22:32
54

I found this error hapenning when there is circular dependency on the headers. Check if the .h file where you declare this method is imported in ANObject.h

  • 3
    Yes, I was getting similar error due to circular dependency. Avoided it by including forward class declaration in the interface file and importing the header file in the implementation. – Raj Pawan Gumdal Nov 7 '12 at 10:59
  • This works better for me :), thanks! – mm24 Oct 14 '13 at 18:10
  • This solved my problem for me. Tried re-ordering build files etc, didn't help - not that I could understand why that would matter if I'd included the necessary header files (after all, that's what the headers are there to resolve - pre-declaration of types/methods etc before the actual implementation/bodies are encountered by the compiler). Turned out I'd accidentally created a circular dependency on the headers. – Swampie May 13 at 10:20
26

You basically add

@class ANObject;

before @interface!

  • i dont know how but this solved my problem. #import doesnt work and @class works.. – dreampowder Jan 12 '13 at 16:50
  • Good that it works for you :) Always happy to help – JomanJi Jan 12 '13 at 20:05
4

So, for some reason I was getting this error while trying to set a method with an enum type in the parameters. Like so:

- (void)foo:(MyEnumVariable)enumVariable;

I had previously used it like this and never had an issue but now I did. I checked for circular dependency and could find none. I also checked for typos multiple times and no dice. What ended up solving my issue was to adding 'enum' before I wanted to access the variable. Like so:

- (void)foo:(enum MyEnumVariable)enumVariable;
{
     enum MyEnumVariable anotherEnumVariable;
}
1

Usually when I see an error like this it's because I have a typo on a previous line, such as an extra or missing parenthesis or something.

1

It may sound stupid, but wrong shelling or wrong use of uppercase/lowercase letterwrong case this.

  • I hate those letterwrong cases! – DiscDev Jul 29 '14 at 17:40
1

I got this message, when the variable type was misspelled. See below this below

e.g.

-(void)takeSimulatorSafePhotoWithPopoverFrame:(GCRect)popoverFrame {

instead of.....

-(void)takeSimulatorSafePhotoWithPopoverFrame:(CGRect)popoverFrame {
  • 4
    Took me long enough to figure that the difference is CGRect and GCRect. – olivaresF Jan 30 '13 at 1:26
0

Strangely enough, changing the order of my imports has fixed this in the past... Try moving the import to the bottom after all your other imports.

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