23
>>> class Hello:
    pass

and

>>> isinstance(Hello,object)
True
>>> issubclass(Hello,object)
False
>>> a = Hello()
>>> isinstance(a,object)
True

How do you explain isinstance(Hello,object) returns True whilst issubclass(Hello,object) returns False

  • the question title "isinstance() and issubclass() behavior differently" does not read very well to my ears when I say it outloud. wouldn't a better title be "What is the difference between python's built-in functions, isinstance() and issubclass()?" – Trevor Boyd Smith Jan 6 '17 at 14:39
  • I revised the title for you. – BuvinJ Jan 3 '18 at 16:13
22

It's because you are using old-style classes so it doesn't derive from object. Try this instead:

class Hello(object):
    pass

>>> issubclass(Hello,object)
True

Old-style classes are deprecated and you shouldn't use them any more.

In Python 3.x all classes are new-style and writing (object) is no longer required.

  • 5
    Worth noting: this applies to Python 2. In Python 3 there's no need for deriving from object explicitly. – Cat Plus Plus Nov 12 '11 at 20:30
  • And how to define new-style classes then? Thanks. – Tarik Nov 12 '11 at 20:40
  • 1
    And also why it returns True for isintance()? If they are not derived from object... – Tarik Nov 12 '11 at 20:42
  • 6
    Old style classes are instances (not subclasses!) of types.ClassType type. As all types, it's a subclass of object, that's why any old style class is an instance of object type. – yak Nov 12 '11 at 22:03
64

The accepted answer is correct, but seems to miss an important point. The built-in functions isinstance and issubclass ask two different questions.

isinstance(object, classinfo) asks whether an object is an instance of a class (or a tuple of classes).

issubclass(class, classinfo) asks whether one class is a subclass of another class (or other classes).

In either method, classinfo can be a “class, type, or tuple of classes, types, and such tuples.”

Since classes are themselves objects, isinstance applies just fine. We can also ask whether a class is a subclass of another class. But, we shouldn't necessarily expect the same answer from both questions.

class Foo(object):
    pass

class Bar(Foo):
    pass

issubclass(Bar, Foo)
#>True
isinstance(Bar, Foo)
#>False

Bar is a subclass of Foo, not an instance of it. Bar is an instance of type which is a subclass of object, therefore the class Bar is an instance of object.

isinstance(Bar, type)
#>True
issubclass(type, object)
#>True
isinstance(Bar, object)
#>True
  • isinstance(Foo, Foo) == False. So if isinstance(ob, Foo)==True you know you have a proper instantiated object ob of type Foo (or subclass of Foo), so you can operate on it safely and correctly – Tino Nov 29 '16 at 8:04
  • You wording seems to mis-indicate that type is a subclass of object, when what I think you meant is: either Bar is a subclass of object, or that type is a metaclass for object. In either case, I think you should correct it. – J. C. Rocamonde Sep 4 '18 at 8:41
  • Hi @J. C. Rocamonde, thanks for pointing that out. It is true that type is the metaclass of object, as you say and type(object) will confirm. It is also true that the class type is a subclass of object, unless issubclass(type, object) is lying. Magically, type(type) is type and Python's type system pulls itself up by these somewhat circular bootstraps. :) – cbare Sep 4 '18 at 20:29
11

My answer pertains to Python 3.

To expand upon cbare's answer, the code below was helpful for me.

>>> class X:
...     pass
...     
>>> class Y(X):
...     pass
...     
>>> x = X()
>>> y = Y()
>>> isinstance(x, X)  # is object x an instance of class X (or any subclass)?
True
>>> isinstance(x, Y)  # is object x an instance of class Y (or any subclass)?
False
>>> isinstance(y, X)  # is object y an instance of class X (or any subclass)?
True
>>> isinstance(y, Y)  # is object y an instance of class Y (or any subclass)?
True

>>> issubclass(X, X)  # is class X a subclass of X (including class X)?
True
>>> issubclass(X, Y)  # is class X a subclass of Y (including class Y)?
False
>>> issubclass(Y, X)  # is class Y a subclass of X (including class X)?
True
>>> issubclass(Y, Y)  # is class Y a subclass of Y (including class Y)?
True

>>> issubclass(type(x), X)  # is class of object x a subclass of X (including class X)?
True
>>> issubclass(type(x), Y)  # is class of object x a subclass of Y (including class Y)?
False
>>> issubclass(type(y), X)  # is class of object y a subclass of X (including class X)?
True
>>> issubclass(type(y), Y)  # is class of object y a subclass of Y (including class Y)?
True

>>> issubclass(x.__class__, X)  # is class of object x a subclass of X (including class X)?
True
>>> issubclass(x.__class__, Y)  # is class of object x a subclass of Y (including class Y)?
False
>>> issubclass(y.__class__, X)  # is class of object y a subclass of X (including class X)?
True
>>> issubclass(y.__class__, Y)  # is class of object y a subclass of Y (including class Y)?
True

We can see that isinstance(object, class) respects inheritance / subclasses correctly.

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