I'm having a debate with a co-worker about throwing exceptions from constructors, and thought I would like some feedback.

Is it OK to throw exceptions from constructors, from a design point of view?

Lets say I'm wrapping a POSIX mutex in a class, it would look something like this:

class Mutex {
public:
  Mutex() {
    if (pthread_mutex_init(&mutex_, 0) != 0) {
      throw MutexInitException();
    }
  }

  ~Mutex() {
    pthread_mutex_destroy(&mutex_);
  }

  void lock() {
    if (pthread_mutex_lock(&mutex_) != 0) {
      throw MutexLockException();
    }
  }

  void unlock() {
    if (pthread_mutex_unlock(&mutex_) != 0) {
      throw MutexUnlockException();
    }
  }

private:
  pthread_mutex_t mutex_;
};

My question is, is this the standard way to do it? Because if the pthread mutex_init call fails the mutex object is unusable so throwing an exception ensures that the mutex won't be created.

Should I rather create a member function init for the Mutex class and call pthread mutex_init within which would return a bool based on pthread mutex_init's return? This way I don't have to use exceptions for such a low level object.

  • Another link on related topic: writeulearn.com/exception-constructor – user4215465 Nov 4 '14 at 17:38
  • Well it is ok to throw from ctors as much as it is from any other function, that being said you should throw with care from any function. – g24l Dec 26 '15 at 23:04
  • 4
    Something unrelated: why not removing your lock/unlock methods, and directly lock the mutex in the constructor and unlock in the destructor? That way simply declaring an auto variable in a scope automatically lock/unlock, no need to take care of exceptions, returns, etc... See std::lock_guard for a similar implementation. – Laurent Grégoire Jul 7 '16 at 8:25
  • If your construction fails and throws an exception, ~Mutex() will not be called and mutex_ will not be cleaned up. Don't throw exceptions in constructors. – Andy Krouwel Feb 10 '17 at 14:06
  • ...Unless they're very simple and don't have any form of cleanup code. Otherwise you will get a nasty shock. – Andy Krouwel Feb 10 '17 at 16:04

10 Answers 10

up vote 225 down vote accepted

Yes, throwing an exception from the failed constructor is the standard way of doing this. Read this FAQ about Handling a constructor that fails for more information. Having a init() method will also work, but everybody who creates the object of mutex has to remember that init() has to be called. I feel it goes against the RAII principle.

  • 13
    In most situations. Don;t forget things like std::fstream. On failure it still creates an object, but because we are always testing the state of the object normally it works well. So an object that has a natural state that is tested under normal usage may not need to throw. – Martin York May 1 '09 at 14:49
  • 1
    @Widor: Thank you for reviewing my suggested edit no. 278978. My I ask one more, edit-related question? The answer to which this comment is attached has an outdated hyperlink. To fix it wants to change exactly one character, replacing "#faq-17.2" with "#faq-17.8" in the URL. However, Stackoverflow's software requires that an edit submitted by a low-reputation user like me change at least six characters. Pretty obviously, the broken link wants to be fixed, and it just isn't a six-character fix. Do you know how I can fix it, please? – thb Jun 3 '12 at 16:51
  • 4
    Not really, in this specific case, note that his Mutex destructor will never be called, possibly leaking the pthread mutex. The solution to that is to use a smart pointer for the pthread mutex, better yet use boost mutexes or std::mutex, no reason to keep using old functional-style OS constructs when there are better alternatives. – Ion Todirel Oct 21 '12 at 7:33

If you do throw an exception from a constructor, keep in mind that you need to use the function try/catch syntax if you need to catch that exception in a constructor initializer list.

e.g.

func::func() : foo()
{
    try {...}
    catch (...) // will NOT catch exceptions thrown from foo constructor
    { ... }
}

vs.

func::func()
    try : foo() {...}
    catch (...) // will catch exceptions thrown from foo constructor
    { ... }

Throwing an exception is the best way of dealing with constructor failure. You should particularly avoid half-constructing an object and then relying on users of your class to detect construction failure by testing flag variables of some sort.

On a related point, the fact that you have several different exception types for dealing with mutex errors worries me slightly. Inheritance is a great tool, but it can be over-used. In this case I would probably prefer a single MutexError exception, possibly containing an informative error message.

  • I'd second Neil's point about the exception heirarchy - a single MutexError is likely to be a better choice unless you specifically want to handle a lock error differently. If you have too many exception types, catching them all can become tiresome and error prone. – markh44 May 1 '09 at 11:30
  • I agree that one type of mutex exception is enough. And this will also make error handling more intuitive. – lkristjansen May 1 '09 at 12:19

It is OK to throw from your constructor, but you should make sure that your object is constructed after main has started and before it finishes:

class A
{
public:
  A () {
    throw int ();
  }
};

A a;     // Implementation defined behaviour if exception is thrown (15.3/13)

int main ()
{
  try
  {
    // Exception for 'a' not caught here.
  }
  catch (int)
  {
  }
}
#include <iostream>

class bar
{
public:
  bar()
  {
    std::cout << "bar() called" << std::endl;
  }

  ~bar()
  {
    std::cout << "~bar() called" << std::endl;

  }
};
class foo
{
public:
  foo()
    : b(new bar())
  {
    std::cout << "foo() called" << std::endl;
    throw "throw something";
  }

  ~foo()
  {
    delete b;
    std::cout << "~foo() called" << std::endl;
  }

private:
  bar *b;
};


int main(void)
{
  try {
    std::cout << "heap: new foo" << std::endl;
    foo *f = new foo();
  } catch (const char *e) {
    std::cout << "heap exception: " << e << std::endl;
  }

  try {
    std::cout << "stack: foo" << std::endl;
    foo f;
  } catch (const char *e) {
    std::cout << "stack exception: " << e << std::endl;
  }

  return 0;
}

the output:

heap: new foo
bar() called
foo() called
heap exception: throw something
stack: foo
bar() called
foo() called
stack exception: throw something

the destructors are not called, so if a exception need to be thrown in a constructor, a lot of stuff(e.g. clean up?) to do.

  • Very good point. I'm surprised that no other answer addresses this type of leak. – Carlton Jul 19 '16 at 12:56
  • 7
    You should be using a std::unique_ptr or similar. Destructor of members is called if an exception is thrown during construction, but plain pointers don't have any. Replace bar* b with std::unique_ptr<bar> b (you'll have to remove the delete b; and add the <memory> header), and run again. – cbuchart Feb 10 '17 at 15:42
  • 2
    This behavior is quite sensible. If the constructor has failed (was no successfully completed) why should the destructor be called? It has nothing to clean up and if did try to clean up objects which have not even been instantiated properly (think some pointers), it will cause a lot more problems, unnecessarily. – zar Oct 26 '17 at 20:10
  • 1
    @zar Yes, the problem is not whether the destructor should be called or not. In this example, clean up should be done before throwing the exception. And I don't mean we cannot throw an exception in the constructor, I just mean the developer should known what he is dong. No good, no bad, but think before doing. – Morris Oct 27 '17 at 4:41
  • 1
    According to @Naveen's answer, it seems that the memory does freed. But valgrind --leak-check=full ./a.out complains block lost: ERROR SUMMARY: 2 errors from 2 contexts – Morris Oct 27 '17 at 4:54

If your project generally relies on exceptions to distinguish bad data from good data, then throwing an exception from the constructor is better solution than not throwing. If exception is not thrown, then object is initialized in a zombie state. Such object needs to expose a flag which says whether the object is correct or not. Something like this:

class Scaler
{
    public:
        Scaler(double factor)
        {
            if (factor == 0)
            {
                _state = 0;
            }
            else
            {
                _state = 1;
                _factor = factor;
            }
        }

        double ScaleMe(double value)
        {
            if (!_state)
                throw "Invalid object state.";
            return value / _factor;
        }

        int IsValid()
        {
            return _status;
        }

    private:
        double _factor;
        int _state;

}

Problem with this approach is on the caller side. Every user of the class would have to do an if before actually using the object. This is a call for bugs - there's nothing simpler than forgetting to test a condition before continuing.

In case of throwing an exception from the constructor, entity which constructs the object is supposed to take care of problems immediately. Object consumers down the stream are free to assume that object is 100% operational from the mere fact that they obtained it.

This discussion can continue in many directions.

For example, using exceptions as a matter of validation is a bad practice. One way to do it is a Try pattern in conjunction with factory class. If you're already using factories, then write two methods:

class ScalerFactory
{
    public:
        Scaler CreateScaler(double factor) { ... }
        int TryCreateScaler(double factor, Scaler **scaler) { ... };
}

With this solution you can obtain the status flag in-place, as a return value of the factory method, without ever entering the constructor with bad data.

Second thing is if you are covering the code with automated tests. In that case every piece of code which uses object which does not throw exceptions would have to be covered with one additional test - whether it acts correctly when IsValid() method returns false. This explains quite well that initializing objects in zombie state is a bad idea.

Apart from the fact that you do not need to throw from the constructor in your specific case because pthread_mutex_lock actually returns an EINVAL if your mutex has not been initialized and you can throw after the call to lock as is done in std::mutex:

void
lock()
{
  int __e = __gthread_mutex_lock(&_M_mutex);

  // EINVAL, EAGAIN, EBUSY, EINVAL, EDEADLK(may)
  if (__e)
__throw_system_error(__e);
}

then in general throwing from constructors is ok for acquisition errors during construction, and in compliance with RAII ( Resource-acquisition-is-Initialization ) programming paradigm.

Check this example on RAII

void write_to_file (const std::string & message) {
    // mutex to protect file access (shared across threads)
    static std::mutex mutex;

    // lock mutex before accessing file
    std::lock_guard<std::mutex> lock(mutex);

    // try to open file
    std::ofstream file("example.txt");
    if (!file.is_open())
        throw std::runtime_error("unable to open file");

    // write message to file
    file << message << std::endl;

    // file will be closed 1st when leaving scope (regardless of exception)
    // mutex will be unlocked 2nd (from lock destructor) when leaving
    // scope (regardless of exception)
}

Focus on these statements:

  1. static std::mutex mutex
  2. std::lock_guard<std::mutex> lock(mutex);
  3. std::ofstream file("example.txt");

The first statement is RAII and noexcept. In (2) it is clear that RAII is applied on lock_guard and it actually can throw , whereas in (3) ofstream seems not to be RAII , since the objects state has to be checked by calling is_open() that checks the failbit flag.

At first glance it seems that it is undecided on what it the standard way and in the first case std::mutex does not throw in initialization , *in contrast to OP implementation * . In the second case it will throw whatever is thrown from std::mutex::lock, and in the third there is no throw at all.

Notice the differences:

(1) Can be declared static, and will actually be declared as a member variable (2) Will never actually be expected to be declared as a member variable (3) Is expected to be declared as a member variable, and the underlying resource may not always be available.

All these forms are RAII; to resolve this, one must analyse RAII.

  • Resource : your object
  • Acquisition ( allocation ) : you object being created
  • Initialization : your object is in its invariant state

This does not require you to initialize and connect everything on construction. For example when you would create a network client object you would not actually connect it to the server upon creation, since it is a slow operation with failures. You would instead write a connect function to do just that. On the other hand you could create the buffers or just set its state.

Therefore, your issue boils down to defining your initial state. If in your case your initial state is mutex must be initialized then you should throw from the constructor. In contrast it is just fine not to initialize then ( as is done in std::mutex ), and define your invariant state as mutex is created . At any rate the invariant is not compromized necessarily by the state of its member object, since the mutex_ object mutates between locked and unlocked through the Mutex public methods Mutex::lock() and Mutex::unlock().

class Mutex {
private:
  int e;
  pthread_mutex_t mutex_;

public:
  Mutex(): e(0) {
  e = pthread_mutex_init(&mutex_);
  }

  void lock() {

    e = pthread_mutex_lock(&mutex_);
    if( e == EINVAL ) 
    { 
      throw MutexInitException();
    }
    else (e ) {
      throw MutexLockException();
    }
  }

  // ... the rest of your class
};

The only time you would NOT throw exceptions from constructors is if your project has a rule against using exceptions (for instance, Google doesn't like exceptions). In that case, you wouldn't want to use exceptions in your constructor any more than anywhere else, and you'd have to have an init method of some sort instead.

  • You may be interested in the lengthy discussion on the Google guidelines at groups.google.com/group/comp.lang.c++.moderated/browse_thread/… – anon May 1 '09 at 16:16
  • 4
    Interesting discussion. My personal opinion is that you should use exceptions only when you actually design the program's error handling structure to take advantage of them. If you try to do error handling after writing the code, or try to shoehorn exceptions into programs that were not written for them, it's just going to lead to either try/catch EVERYWHERE (eliminating the advantages of exceptions) or to programs crashing out at the least little error. I deal with both every day and I don't like it. – Michael Kohne May 1 '09 at 18:22

Adding to all the answers here, I thought to mention, a very specific reason/scenario where you might want to prefer to throw the exception from the class's Init method and not from the Ctor (which off course is the preferred and more common approach).

I will mention in advance that this example (scenario) assumes that you don't use "smart pointers" (i.e.- std::unique_ptr) for your class' s pointer(s) data members.

So to the point: In case, you wish that the Dtor of your class will "take action" when you invoke it after (for this case) you catch the exception that your Init() method threw - you MUST not throw the exception from the Ctor, cause a Dtor invocation for Ctor's are NOT invoked on "half-baked" objects.

See the below example to demonstrate my point:

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

class A
{
    public:
    A(int a)
        : m_a(a)
    {
        cout << "A::A - setting m_a to:" << m_a << endl;
    }

    ~A()
    {
        cout << "A::~A" << endl;
    }

    int m_a;
};

class B
{
public:
    B(int b)
        : m_b(b)
    {
        cout << "B::B - setting m_b to:" << m_b << endl;
    }

    ~B()
    {
        cout << "B::~B" << endl;
    }

    int m_b;
};

class C
{
public:
    C(int a, int b, const string& str)
        : m_a(nullptr)
        , m_b(nullptr)
        , m_str(str)
    {
        m_a = new A(a);
        cout << "C::C - setting m_a to a newly A object created on the heap (address):" << m_a << endl;
        if (b == 0)
        {
            throw exception("sample exception to simulate situation where m_b was not fully initialized in class C ctor");
        }

        m_b = new B(b);
        cout << "C::C - setting m_b to a newly B object created on the heap (address):" << m_b << endl;
    }

    ~C()
    {
        delete m_a;
        delete m_b;
        cout << "C::~C" << endl;
    }

    A* m_a;
    B* m_b;
    string m_str;
};

class D
{
public:
    D()
        : m_a(nullptr)
        , m_b(nullptr)
    {
        cout << "D::D" << endl;
    }

    void InitD(int a, int b)
    {
        cout << "D::InitD" << endl;
        m_a = new A(a);
        throw exception("sample exception to simulate situation where m_b was not fully initialized in class D Init() method");
        m_b = new B(b);
    }

    ~D()
    {
        delete m_a;
        delete m_b;
        cout << "D::~D" << endl;
    }

    A* m_a;
    B* m_b;
};

void item10Usage()
{
    cout << "item10Usage - start" << endl;

    // 1) invoke a normal creation of a C object - on the stack
    // Due to the fact that C's ctor throws an exception - its dtor
    // won't be invoked when we leave this scope
    {
        try
        {
            C c(1, 0, "str1");
        }
        catch (const exception& e)
        {
            cout << "item10Usage - caught an exception when trying to create a C object on the stack:" << e.what() << endl;
        }
    }

    // 2) same as in 1) for a heap based C object - the explicit call to 
    //    C's dtor (delete pc) won't have any effect
    C* pc = 0;
    try
    {
        pc = new C(1, 0, "str2");
    }
    catch (const exception& e)
    {
        cout << "item10Usage - caught an exception while trying to create a new C object on the heap:" << e.what() << endl;
        delete pc; // 2a)
    }

    // 3) Here, on the other hand, the call to delete pd will indeed 
    //    invoke D's dtor
    D* pd = new D();
    try
    {
        pd->InitD(1,0);
    }
    catch (const exception& e)
    {
        cout << "item10Usage - caught an exception while trying to init a D object:" << e.what() << endl;
        delete pd; 
    }

    cout << "\n \n item10Usage - end" << endl;
}

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
    cout << "main - start" << endl;
    item10Usage();
    cout << "\n \n main - end" << endl;
    return 0;
}

I will mention again, that it is not the recommended approach, just wanted to share an additional point of view.

Also, as you might have seen from some of the print in the code - it is based on item 10 in the fantastic "More effective C++" by Scott Meyers (1st edition).

Hope it helps.

Cheers,

Guy.

Although I have not worked C++ at a professional level, in my opinion, it is OK to throw exceptions from the constructors. I do that(if needed) in .Net. Check out this and this link. It might be of your interest.

  • 12
    .NET is not C++ , neither JAVA is. The mechanism of throwing are not the same and the costs are different. – g24l Dec 26 '15 at 20:10

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