51

When I use the html <base> tag to define a base URL for all relative links on a page, anchor links also refer directly to the base URL. Is there a way to set the base URL that would still allow anchor links to refer to the currently open page?

For example, if I have a page at http://example.com/foo/:


Current behaviour:

<base href="http://example.com/" />
<a href="bar/">bar</a> <!-- Links to "http://example.com/bar/" -->
<a href="#baz">baz</a> <!-- Links to "http://example.com/#baz" -->

Desired behaviour:

<base href="http://example.com/" />
<a href="bar/">bar</a> <!-- Links to "http://example.com/bar/" -->
<a href="#baz">baz</a> <!-- Links to "http://example.com/foo/#baz" -->
  • Are you using a server side programming language? You could dynamically inline the current request URI in the link. See also stackoverflow.com/questions/1889076/… – BalusC Nov 13 '11 at 17:40
  • @BalusC I'm not, and I'd rather avoid it if possible. – Chris Down Nov 13 '11 at 19:13
  • Well, if everything is already static like that, then just use <a href="foo#baz">. – BalusC Nov 13 '11 at 20:45
  • I have to say this is so wrong, you set the base to http://server/ and you tell it to navigate to #baz, it will go http://server/#baz, that's how relative URLS work, and that's what using <base> does, it changes what relative URLs are based on. If that's not what you want, your link should not be relative, or it should be relative to the base's href (foo#baz) – Juan Mendes Dec 12 '17 at 19:59

11 Answers 11

24
+50

i found a solution on this site: using-base-href-with-anchors that doesn't require jQuery and here is a working snippet:

<base href="https://example.com/">

<a href="/test">/test</a>
<a href="javascript:;" onclick="document.location.hash='test';">Anchor</a>

or without inline js, something like this:

document.addEventListener('DOMContentLoaded', function(){
  var es = document.getElementsByTagName('a')
  for(var i=0; i<es.length; i++){
    es[i].addEventListener('click', function(e) {
      e.preventDefault()
      document.location.hash = e.target.getAttribute('href')
    })
  }
})
| improve this answer | |
  • why is it bad practice? – davide bubz Jan 14 '16 at 10:25
  • 2
    There are many reason of why is not good, some of that are explained here – Stefano Saitta Jan 14 '16 at 15:12
  • 12
    It is perfectly valid to use inline javascript -- it exists for a reason. The arguments against it in that document are spurious. Should you base your entire large project off inline code? Probably not. Can you use inline code with intention and as a solution to an edge-case/gotchya? Absolutely. It is part of the HTML spec for a reason. Pushing a blanket ban on inline JS because of the filesize of the HTML document is cargo cult nonsense. If you put the same code in an external JS file, the client still downloads those bytes. – Chris Baker Mar 25 '16 at 19:44
  • 3
    This solution doesn't degrade well. On browsers with Javascript disabled (or html parsers using regex) your link will be broken. – Joram van den Boezem May 16 '17 at 12:54
12

Building upon @James Tomasino answer, this one is slightly more efficient, solves a bug with double hashes in the url and a syntax error.

$(document).ready(function() {
    var pathname = window.location.href.split('#')[0];
    $('a[href^="#"]').each(function() {
        var $this = $(this),
            link = $this.attr('href');
        $this.attr('href', pathname + link);
    });
});
| improve this answer | |
7

A little bit of jQuery could probably help you with that. Although base href is working as desired, if you want your links beginning with an anchor (#) to be totally relative, you could hijack all links, check the href property for those starting with #, and rebuild them using the current URL.

$(document).ready(function () {
    var pathname = window.location.href;
    $('a').each(function () {
       var link = $(this).attr('href');
       if (link.substr(0,1) == "#") {
           $(this).attr('href', pathname + link);
       }
    });
}
| improve this answer | |
  • Whilst this may be fine in some situations, the demographic for the site I'm making are the sort that may have JavaScript disabled (or not available). Since the only fallback for such a case would be breakage, that seems a bit concerning. – Chris Down Nov 13 '11 at 21:00
  • 1
    Your best bet, then, is to code all links with full relative paths from the baseURL, including anchors. – James Tomasino Nov 13 '11 at 23:24
2

Here's an even shorter, jQuery based version I use in a production environment, and it works well for me.

$().ready(function() {
  $("a[href^='\#']").each(function(){ 
    this.href=location.href.split("#")[0]+'#'+this.href.substr(this.href.indexOf('#')+1);
  });
});
| improve this answer | |
  • Why the downvote? It may not be elegant, but it's basically the same approach as other answers here that are nowhere near as succinct and yet have been voted up. – contendia Feb 10 '16 at 9:18
  • 1
    Somebody probably down-voted since it didn't work for THEIR situation and knew not how to adapt. I see nothing wrong with this aside from no mention of the (assuming jQuery) library requirement. – Mavelo Dec 10 '17 at 20:05
  • @Robert Good point. I updated the post to reflect the jQuery requirement. Thx for the feedback. – contendia Dec 12 '17 at 19:10
  • 2
    Suggesting use of jQuery when jQuery is not mentioned is shunned upon. – Juan Mendes Dec 12 '17 at 20:02
  • While this first and foremost a learning site, coders should know how to convert jquery into vanilla javascript. Especially since nearly every example on this thread depends on one js library or another. libraries do the same things, just simplify getting from point A to B :P I upvoted his solution since it is a perfectly valid solution IMO – Mavelo Dec 13 '17 at 2:31
1

If you use PHP, you can use following function to generate anchor links:

function generateAnchorLink($anchor) {
  $currentURL = "//{$_SERVER['HTTP_HOST']}{$_SERVER['REQUEST_URI']}";
  $escaped = htmlspecialchars($currentURL, ENT_QUOTES, 'UTF-8');
  return $escaped . '#' . $anchor;
}

Use it in the code like that:

<a href="<?php echo generateAnchorLink("baz"); ?>">baz</a>
| improve this answer | |
0

I'm afraid there is no way to solve this without any server-side or browser-side script. You can try the following plain JavaScript (without jQuery) implementation:

document.addEventListener("click", function(event) {
  var element = event.target;
  if (element.tagName.toLowerCase() == "a" && 
      element.getAttribute("href").indexOf("#") === 0) {
    element.href = location.href + element.getAttribute("href");
  }
});
<base href="https://example.com/">

<a href="/test">/test</a>
<a href="#test">#test</a>

It also works (unlike the other answers) for dynamically generated (i.e. created with JavaScript) a elements.

| improve this answer | |
  • @jor It works fine for me. Which browser are you using? – Michał Perłakowski Jul 4 '16 at 7:04
  • Firefox 47. I had the hashes concatenated. Try also to open a url that already includes a hash and click on an anchor link; this will append it to the existing hash. – jor Jul 4 '16 at 9:09
0

To prevent multiple # in URL:

         document.addEventListener("click", function(event) {
          var element = event.target;
          if (element.tagName.toLowerCase() == "a" && 
            element.getAttribute("href").indexOf("#") === 0) {
            my_href = location.href + element.getAttribute("href");
            my_href = my_href.replace(/#+/g, '#');
            element.href = my_href;
          }
        });
| improve this answer | |
0

You could also provide an absolute url:

<base href="https://example.com/">
<a href="/test#test">test</a>

Rather than this

<a href="#test">test</a>
| improve this answer | |
0

From the example given in the question. To achieve desired behavior, I do not see the need of using "base" tag at all.

The page is at http://example.com/foo/

Below code will give the desired behaviour:

<a href="/bar/">bar</a> <!-- Links to "http://example.com/bar/" -->
<a href="#baz">baz</a> <!-- Links to "http://example.com/foo/#baz" -->

The trick is to use "/" at the beginning of string href="/bar/".

| improve this answer | |
0

You can use some javascript code inside the tag that links.

<span onclick="javascript:var mytarget=((document.location.href.indexOf('#')==-1)? document.location.href + '#destination_anchor' : document.location.href);document.location.href=mytarget;return false;" style="display:inline-block;border:1px solid;border-radius:0.3rem"
 >Text of link</span>

How does it work when the user clicks?

  1. First it checks if the anchor (#) is already present in the URL. The condition is tested before the "?" sign. This is to avoid the anchor being added twice in the URL if the user clicks again the same link, since the redirection then wouldn't work.
  2. If there is sharp sign (#) in the existing URL, the anchor is appended to it and the result is saved in the mytarget variable. Else, keep the page URL unchanged.
  3. Lastly, go to the (modified or unchanged) URL stored by the mytarget variable.

Instead of <span>, you can also use <div> or even <a> tags. I would suggest avoiding <a> in order to avoid any unwanted redirection if javascript is disabled or not working, and emultate the look of your <a> tag with some CSS styling. If despite this you want to use the <a> tag, don't forget adding return false; at the end of the javascript and set the href attribute like this <a onclick="here the javascript;return false;" href="javascript:return false;">...</a>.

| improve this answer | |
-2

If you're using Angular 2+ (and just targeting the web) you can do this:

component.ts

document = document; // Make document available in template

component.html

<a [href]="document.location.pathname + '#' + anchorName">Click Here</a>
| improve this answer | |

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.