62

I have dictionary Dictionary<string, Point>

the Key is c1,c3,c2,t1,,t4,t2 I want to sort them to be c1,c2,c3,t1,t2,t3

I'm trying to sort it using

Input.OrderBy(key => key.Key );

but it doesn't work

any idea how to solve that

4

8 Answers 8

54

Input.OrderBy does not sort the dictionary, it creates a query that returns the items in a specific order.

Perhaps OrderedDictionary gives you what you want.

Or use the Generic SortedDictionary

0
31

Since Input.OrderBy creates a query that returns the items in an ordered order, just assign it to the same dictionary.

objectDict = objectDict.OrderBy(obj => obj.Key).ToDictionary(obj => obj.Key, obj => obj.Value);

29

Load the unsorted object into a SortedDictionary object like so:

var sortedCustomerData 
    = new SortedDictionary<string, string>(unsortedCustomerData);

Where unsortedCustomerData is the same generic type (Dictionary string, string or in your case string, point). It will automatically sort the new object by key

According to msdn: SortedDictionary<TKey, TValue>(IDictionary<TKey, TValue>): Initializes a new instance of the SortedDictionary<TKey, TValue> class that contains elements copied from the specified IDictionary<TKey, TValue> and uses the default IComparer<T> implementation for the key type.

0
8

Just a guess but it looks like you are assuming it is going to sort Input. The OrderBy method actually returns an ordered instance of an IOrderedEnumerable containing the same values. If you want to keep the return value you can do the below:

IOrderedEnumerable orderedInput
orderedInput = Input.OrderBy(key=>key.Key)

Most methods that would modify the collection follow this same pattern. It does this so that it is not changing the origional collection instance. This protects you from accidently changing the instance when you didn't intend to. If you do want to only use the sorted instance then you just set the variable to the return of the method as shown above.

0
4

The following code uses two more lists to sort a dictionary.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Drawing;

namespace ConsoleApplication1 {
    class Program {
        static void Main(string[] args) {
            Dictionary<string,Point> r=new Dictionary<string,Point>();
            r.Add("c3",new Point(0,1));
            r.Add("c1",new Point(1,2));
            r.Add("t3",new Point(2,3));
            r.Add("c4",new Point(3,4));
            r.Add("c2",new Point(4,5));
            r.Add("t1",new Point(5,6));
            r.Add("t2",new Point(6,7));
            // Create a list of keys
            List<string> zlk=new List<string>(r.Keys);
            // and then sort it.
            zlk.Sort();
            List<Point> zlv=new List<Point>();
            // Readd with the order.
            foreach(var item in zlk) {
                zlv.Add(r[item]);
            }
            r.Clear();
            for(int i=0;i<zlk.Count;i++) {
                r[zlk[i]]=zlv[i];
            }
            // test output
            foreach(var item in r.Keys) {
                Console.WriteLine(item+" "+r[item].X+" "+r[item].Y);
            }
            Console.ReadKey(true);
        }
    }
}

The output of the code above is shown below.

c1 1 2
c2 4 5
c3 0 1
c4 3 4
t1 5 6
t2 6 7
t3 2 3
0

I used

var l =  Input.OrderBy(key => key.Key);

and I converted it to Dictionary

1
  • 3
    A I stated: this does NOT sort the dictionary! It creates a sorted 'view'.
    – Emond
    Commented Nov 13, 2011 at 8:18
0

It depends what your needs are. If you need the keys out as a list a one time order by would work. I have made below test which you can run and see how to implement order by key.

[Fact]
public void SortDict()
{
    // Arrange
    var initial = new Dictionary<string, bool>()
    {
        {"c1", true },
        {"c3", true },
        {"c2", true },
        {"t1", true },
        {"t3", true },
        {"t2", true },
    };
    var expected = new List<string>() { "c1", "c2", "c3", "t1", "t2", "t3" };

    // Act
    var actual = initial.OrderBy(k => k.Key).Select(k => k.Key)
        .ToList();

    // Assert
    actual.ShouldBeEquivalentTo(expected);
}

If you instead need your keys to always be sorted I would use a SortedDictionary. In below I'm creating a SortedDictionary using its constructor with the old dictionary as parameter. You can run the test and verify the result.

[Fact]
public void SortDictUsingLinq()
{
    // Arrange
    var initial = new Dictionary<string, bool>()
    {
        {"c1", true },
        {"c3", true },
        {"c2", true },
        {"t1", true },
        {"t3", true },
        {"t2", true },
    };
    var expected = new List<string>() { "c1", "c2", "c3", "t1", "t2", "t3" };

    // Act
    var sortedDict = new SortedDictionary<string, bool>(initial);

    // Assert
    sortedDict.Keys.ToList().ShouldBeEquivalentTo(expected);
}

SortedDictionary has O(log n) insertion and retrieval times compared to Dictionary which has O(1). Hence if it is only once or rarely you need elements sorted and you insert and remove often one time sort would be what you need.

-6

ok check this it should work

var r = new Dictionary<string, Point>();
r.Add("c3", new Point(0, 0));
r.Add("c1", new Point(0, 0));
r.Add("t3", new Point(0, 0));
r.Add("c4", new Point(0, 0));
r.Add("c2", new Point(0, 0));
r.Add("t1", new Point(0, 0));
r.Add("t2", new Point(0, 0));
var l = r.OrderBy(key => key.Key);
var dic = l.ToDictionary((keyItem) => keyItem.Key, (valueItem) => valueItem.Value);

foreach (var item in dic)
{

    Console.WriteLine(item.Key);
}
Console.ReadLine();
4
  • 2
    -1: This wont work. You just created another Dictionary with no ordering. It might work for small dictionaries but will fail eventually.
    – leppie
    Commented Nov 13, 2011 at 9:06
  • we spoked in chat and I know what he wants so i helped him to solve his problem
    – DeveloperX
    Commented Nov 13, 2011 at 9:11
  • 14
    @DeveloperX - My guess is that people are down-voting because it doesn't answer the question. We do not see the chat, so people probably do not consider it a useful answer to the question that we do see.
    – Emond
    Commented Nov 13, 2011 at 10:14
  • as @leppie mentioned this will fail eventually, using sorteddictionary is the way to go Commented Mar 30, 2022 at 13:29

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