69

I'm trying to get random numbers between 0 and 100. But I want them to be unique, not repeated in a sequence. For example if I got 5 numbers, they should be 82,12,53,64,32 and not 82,12,53,12,32 I used this, but it generates same numbers in a sequence.

Random rand = new Random();
selected = rand.nextInt(100);

17 Answers 17

123
  • Add each number in the range sequentially in a list structure.
  • Shuffle it.
  • Take the first 'n'.

Here is a simple implementation. This will print 3 unique random numbers from the range 1-10.

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.Collections;

public class UniqueRandomNumbers {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        ArrayList<Integer> list = new ArrayList<Integer>();
        for (int i=1; i<11; i++) {
            list.add(new Integer(i));
        }
        Collections.shuffle(list);
        for (int i=0; i<3; i++) {
            System.out.println(list.get(i));
        }
    }
}

The first part of the fix with the original approach, as Mark Byers pointed out in an answer now deleted, is to use only a single Random instance.

That is what is causing the numbers to be identical. A Random instance is seeded by the current time in milliseconds. For a particular seed value, the 'random' instance will return the exact same sequence of pseudo random numbers.

  • 3
    +1 for pointing out single random instance and answering the question. :) – Mark Byers Nov 13 '11 at 23:48
  • 1
    Simply brilliant, thank you!!! – Georges Jan 2 '18 at 20:04
  • You don't have to shuffle the entire range. If you want n unique numbers, then you only need to shuffle the first n position using a Fisher-Yates shuffle. This may help with a large list and a small n. – rossum Aug 11 at 8:47
43

With Java 8+ you can use the ints method of Random to get an IntStream of random values then distinct and limit to reduce the stream to a number of unique random values.

ThreadLocalRandom.current().ints(0, 100).distinct().limit(5).forEach(System.out::println);

Random also has methods which create LongStreams and DoubleStreams if you need those instead.

If you want all (or a large amount) of the numbers in a range in a random order it might be more efficient to add all of the numbers to a list, shuffle it, and take the first n because the above example is currently implemented by generating random numbers in the range requested and passing them through a set (similarly to Rob Kielty's answer), which may require generating many more than the amount passed to limit because the probability of a generating a new unique number decreases with each one found. Here's an example of the other way:

List<Integer> range = IntStream.range(0, 100).boxed()
        .collect(Collectors.toCollection(ArrayList::new));
Collections.shuffle(range);
range.subList(0, 99).forEach(System.out::println);
  • I needed this for some code I'm benchmarking, and Arrays#setAll() is a little faster than a stream. So: ` Integer[] indices = new Integer[n]; Arrays.setAll(indices, i -> i); Collections.shuffle(Arrays.asList(indices)); return Arrays.stream(indices).mapToInt(Integer::intValue).toArray(); ` – AbuNassar Feb 20 '18 at 13:18
18
  1. Create an array of 100 numbers, then randomize their order.
  2. Devise a pseudo-random number generator that has a range of 100.
  3. Create a boolean array of 100 elements, then set an element true when you pick that number. When you pick the next number check against the array and try again if the array element is set. (You can make an easy-to-clear boolean array with an array of long where you shift and mask to access individual bits.)
  • 2
    +1 for the alternate approach; pick() is an example. – trashgod Nov 13 '11 at 23:55
  • 1
    Instead of using a boolean array, you could use a HashSet, where you store the numbers you have already generated and use contains to test if you have already generated that number. The HashSet will probably be slightly slower than a boolean array, but take up less memory. – Rory O'Kane Nov 21 '13 at 2:40
  • 1
    @RoryO'Kane -- I'm pretty sure the boolean array would take less space, if implemented as an array of long[2]. No way in heck you could make a HashSet that small. – Hot Licks Nov 21 '13 at 2:51
  • The last approach is a bit ugly as it would not have a well defined number of steps to generate the whole sequence. Also you don't need to reinvent the wheel - BitSet. – Pavel Horal Aug 12 '14 at 6:57
16

Use Collections.shuffle() on all 100 numbers and select the first five, as shown here.

11

I feel like this method is worth mentioning.

   private static final Random RANDOM = new Random();    
   /**
     * Pick n numbers between 0 (inclusive) and k (inclusive)
     * While there are very deterministic ways to do this,
     * for large k and small n, this could be easier than creating
     * an large array and sorting, i.e. k = 10,000
     */
    public Set<Integer> pickRandom(int n, int k) {
        final Set<Integer> picked = new HashSet<>();
        while (picked.size() < n) {
            picked.add(RANDOM.nextInt(k + 1));
        }
        return picked;
    }
8

I re-factored Anand's answer to make use not only of the unique properties of a Set but also use the boolean false returned by the set.add() when an add to the set fails.

import java.util.HashSet;
import java.util.Random;
import java.util.Set;

public class randomUniqueNumberGenerator {

    public static final int SET_SIZE_REQUIRED = 10;
    public static final int NUMBER_RANGE = 100;

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Random random = new Random();

        Set set = new HashSet<Integer>(SET_SIZE_REQUIRED);

        while(set.size()< SET_SIZE_REQUIRED) {
            while (set.add(random.nextInt(NUMBER_RANGE)) != true)
                ;
        }
        assert set.size() == SET_SIZE_REQUIRED;
        System.out.println(set);
    }
}
  • 1
    Nice idea. An important mark though - if SET_SIZE_REQUIRED is big enough (let's say, more than NUMBER_RANGE / 2 then you got a much greater expected run-time. – noamgot Jan 9 '18 at 12:15
6

I have made this like that.

    Random random = new Random();
    ArrayList<Integer> arrayList = new ArrayList<Integer>();

    while (arrayList.size() < 6) { // how many numbers u need - it will 6
        int a = random.nextInt(49)+1; // this will give numbers between 1 and 50.

        if (!arrayList.contains(a)) {
            arrayList.add(a);
        }
    }
  • 1
    Thank you.your code works like charm – Ravikiran D Feb 9 at 13:44
4

This will work to generate unique random numbers................

import java.util.HashSet;
import java.util.Random;

public class RandomExample {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Random rand = new Random();
        int e;
        int i;
        int g = 10;
        HashSet<Integer> randomNumbers = new HashSet<Integer>();

        for (i = 0; i < g; i++) {
            e = rand.nextInt(20);
            randomNumbers.add(e);
            if (randomNumbers.size() <= 10) {
                if (randomNumbers.size() == 10) {
                    g = 10;
                }
                g++;
                randomNumbers.add(e);
            }
        }
        System.out.println("Ten Unique random numbers from 1 to 20 are  : " + randomNumbers);
    }
}
3

One clever way to do this is to use exponents of a primitive element in modulus.

For example, 2 is a primitive root mod 101, meaning that the powers of 2 mod 101 give you a non-repeating sequence that sees every number from 1 to 100 inclusive:

2^0 mod 101 = 1
2^1 mod 101 = 2
2^2 mod 101 = 4
...
2^50 mod 101 = 100
2^51 mod 101 = 99
2^52 mod 101 = 97
...
2^100 mod 101 = 1

In Java code, you would write:

void randInts() {
int num=1;
for (int ii=0; ii<101; ii++) {
    System.out.println(num);
    num= (num*2) % 101;
    }
}

Finding a primitive root for a specific modulus can be tricky, but Maple's "primroot" function will do this for you.

2

I have come here from another question, which has been duplicate of this question (Generating unique random number in java)

  1. Store 1 to 100 numbers in an Array.

  2. Generate random number between 1 to 100 as position and return array[position-1] to get the value

  3. Once you use a number in array, mark the value as -1 ( No need to maintain another array to check if this number is already used)

  4. If value in array is -1, get the random number again to fetch new location in array.

0

try this out

public class RandomValueGenerator {
    /**
     * 
     */
    private volatile List<Double> previousGenValues = new ArrayList<Double>();

    public void init() {
        previousGenValues.add(Double.valueOf(0));
    }

    public String getNextValue() {
        Random random = new Random();
        double nextValue=0;
        while(previousGenValues.contains(Double.valueOf(nextValue))) {
            nextValue = random.nextDouble();
        }
        previousGenValues.add(Double.valueOf(nextValue));
        return String.valueOf(nextValue);
    }
}
0

This isn't significantly different from other answers, but I wanted the array of integers in the end:

    Integer[] indices = new Integer[n];
    Arrays.setAll(indices, i -> i);
    Collections.shuffle(Arrays.asList(indices));
    return Arrays.stream(indices).mapToInt(Integer::intValue).toArray();
0

Below is a way I used to generate unique number always. Random function generates number and stores it in textfile then next time it checks it in file compares it and generate new unique number hence in this way there is always a new unique number.

public int GenerateRandomNo()
{
    int _min = 0000;
    int _max = 9999;
    Random _rdm = new Random();
    return _rdm.Next(_min, _max);
}
public int rand_num()
{
    randnum = GenerateRandomNo();
    string createText = randnum.ToString() + Environment.NewLine;
    string file_path = System.IO.Path.GetDirectoryName(System.Windows.Forms.Application.ExecutablePath) + @"\Invoices\numbers.txt";
    File.AppendAllText(file_path, createText);
    int number = File.ReadLines(file_path).Count(); //count number of lines in file
    System.IO.StreamReader file = new System.IO.StreamReader(file_path);
    do
    {
        randnum = GenerateRandomNo();
    }
    while ((file.ReadLine()) == randnum.ToString());
    file.Close();
    return randnum;

}
0

you can use boolean array to fill the true if value taken else set navigate through boolean array to get value as per given below

package study;

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.Arrays;
import java.util.List;

/*
Created By Sachin  Rane on Jul 18, 2018
*/
public class UniqueRandomNumber {
    static Boolean[] boolArray;
    public static void main(String s[]){
        List<Integer> integers = new ArrayList<>();


        for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
            integers.add(i);
        }


        //get unique random numbers
        boolArray = new Boolean[integers.size()+1];
        Arrays.fill(boolArray, false);
        for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
            System.out.print(getUniqueRandomNumber(integers) + " ");

        }

    }

    private static int  getUniqueRandomNumber(List<Integer> integers) {
        int randNum =(int) (Math.random()*integers.size());
        if(boolArray[randNum]){
            while(boolArray[randNum]){
                randNum++;
                if(randNum>boolArray.length){
                    randNum=0;
                }
            }
            boolArray[randNum]=true;
            return randNum;
        }else {
            boolArray[randNum]=true;
            return randNum;
        }

    }

}
0

I have easy solution for this problem, With this we can easily generate n number of unique random numbers, Its just logic anyone can use it in any language.

for(int i=0;i<4;i++)
        {
            rn[i]= GenerateRandomNumber();
            for (int j=0;j<i;j++)
            {
                if (rn[i] == rn[j])
                {
                    i--;
                }
            }
        }
0

Choose n unique random numbers from 0 to m-1.

int[] uniqueRand(int n, int m){
    Random rand = new Random();
    int[] r = new int[n];
    int[] result = new int[n];
    for(int i = 0; i < n; i++){
        r[i] = rand.nextInt(m-i);
        result[i] = r[i];
        for(int j = i-1; j >= 0; j--){
            if(result[i] >= r[j])
                result[i]++;
        }
    }
    return result;
}

Imagine a list containing numbers from 0 to m-1. To choose the first number, we simply use rand.nextInt(m). Then remove the number from the list. Now there remains m-1 numbers, so we call rand.nextInt(m-1). The number we get represents the position in the list. If it is less than the first number, then it is the second number, since the part of list prior to the first number wasn't changed by the removal of the first number. If the position is greater than or equal to the first number, the second number is position+1. Do some further derivation, you can get this algorithm.

Explanation

This algorithm has O(n^2) complexity. So it is good for generating small amount of unique numbers from a large set. While the shuffle based algorithm need at least O(m) to do the shuffle.

Also shuffle based algorithm need memory to store every possible outcome to do the shuffle, this algorithm doesn’t need.

-2

Check this

public class RandomNumbers {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        // TODO Auto-generated method stub
        int n = 5;
        int A[] = uniqueRandomArray(n);
        for(int i = 0; i<n; i++){
            System.out.println(A[i]);
        }
    }
    public static int[] uniqueRandomArray(int n){
        int [] A = new int[n];
        for(int i = 0; i< A.length; ){
            if(i == A.length){
                break;
            }
            int b = (int)(Math.random() *n) + 1;
            if(f(A,b) == false){
                A[i++] = b;
            } 
        }
        return A;
    }
    public static boolean f(int[] A, int n){
        for(int i=0; i<A.length; i++){
            if(A[i] == n){
                return true;
            }
        }
        return false;
    }
}
  • 2
    Throwing java standards, readability and usability out the window eh? – austin wernli May 12 '15 at 21:00
  • Code is not an answer.. You write an answer, and then you add code to explain what you wanted. – Aditya Jan 18 '16 at 8:01

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