5
#include<stdio.h>
int x=13; // forcing space allocation 
int x; 
int main(){
  printf("%d\n",x); 
}

The code above compiles but the one below does not. why ?

#include<stdio.h> 
int main(){
  int x=13; // forcing space allocation 
  int x;
  printf("%d\n",x); 
}

i was told that int x ; can be interpreted by the complier as a declaration or definition depending on the context . i can see that in the first case(global one) but what happens in the second.

4

Quoting:

You can't have two global variables with the same name in C program. C might allow multiple definitions in the same file scope through the tentative definition rule, but in any case all definitions will refer to the same variable.

2
  • i agree with what you say. But why does not the same thing apply to the local variables. I thing i'm missing something very obvious. Please point in the right direction – Bazooka Nov 14 '11 at 16:41
  • you can have tentative definition only for variables that have file scope, and not for local variables. – Igor Oks Nov 14 '11 at 16:54
1

Because you can't declare twice a local variable with the same name. Simply don't do that.

It works for the global one, as the compiler see that as a forward declaration, which of course cannot work with stack variables.

Note that it can only work globally when no value is assigned.

7
  • 1
    It works for the global variables. Why not for the automatic types ? – Bazooka Nov 14 '11 at 16:29
  • What do you call an automatic type? – Macmade Nov 14 '11 at 16:31
  • a variable local to a function – Bazooka Nov 14 '11 at 16:33
  • Better call it a local or stack variable. Also, can you please tell us why you need to declare twice the same variable? – Macmade Nov 14 '11 at 16:34
  • can you please elaborate on the forward declaration part. – Bazooka Nov 14 '11 at 16:45
0

Continuing on from your comment: "can you please elaborate on the forward declarations"...

Forward declarations are exactly what they sound like. A declaration that will, elsewhere (usually later) be defined. This concept only applies to global symbols. There can only be ONE definition of a global symbol within a resulting binary. You can, however, declare them over and over again within the source code so that they can be referenced during the compile phase.

These symbols become definitions in assembly which are then later used in to link everything together during the linking phase.

Header files are a common use examples of forward declarations that are defined elsewhere (later) in the code.

Local (automatic) variables do not get converted to symbols. So when you say something like

int x;
int x;

within the same scope the compiler disallows it because it is nonsensical. Local variables are simply a convenience to point to a particular location within the function's stack frame. Their definition boundary is within scope markers { }.

Header files are essentially "forward declarations" of global variables and functions; to see this for your as in struct foo;.

If you would like to see the global definition cause errors try. int x = 10; int x = 11; as a global, and you'll see the compiler spit out an error to the effect "redifintion of x".

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