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We're having a bit of a dispute at my office as to how this question should be interpreted.

**Time 1 = 0.6053 seconds Time 2 = 1.3477 seconds

What percentage faster is time1 to time 2?**

I am of the believe that if you have a time of X seconds. X/2 (half as long) is 100% faster.

My solution to this problem is calculated as

(T2/T1)-1

1.3477/.6053 - 1 = 1.2265

Other people are saying that you should just look at these as numbers and calculate it like

1- (T1/T2)

1- .6053/1.3477 = .5508

(the answers above are rounded).

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    It depends on the perspective you're taking (which number serves as the comparison/baseline). Jakub's answer is correct for one perspective. If you want to know how much faster one is (% increase) you're probably looking for (T2 - T1) / T2. Insert round numbers like 90 and 100 instead of the unround numbers to get everyone on the same page.
    – Eric J.
    Nov 14, 2011 at 20:51
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    If you think of "faster" as implying which process' speed is greater, your formula would be correct. If you think it is implying which process' time-span is smaller, their formula is correct. Nov 14, 2011 at 22:17
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    There is a good answer here. math.stackexchange.com/a/716770/421410 Mar 1, 2017 at 23:58
  • The question is written incorrectly. You can't be more than 100% faster than something, without going into the past. +1 to the question anyway because it made me think
    – ashleedawg
    Jun 4, 2018 at 7:55
  • see my answer on the math site: math.stackexchange.com/a/2807461/546590
    – ashleedawg
    Jun 4, 2018 at 9:17

1 Answer 1

22

It makes it easier to use whole numbers..

Lets say X = 100 and Y = 50

You're saying "What percentage faster is time 1 to time 2?" This means, with respect from time 2, how much faster is time 1... Again, using time 2 as the reference point, how does time 1 compare.

So for this, you would use: T1 / T2 = (100 / 50) = twice as fast = 200%

In your case above, X < Y so it would be a percentage less than 100%. Roughly 44.9% faster.

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    It looks like it should be 55.08% faster as the OP posted. Dec 9, 2014 at 6:09
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    T1 = .6053, T2 = 1.3477. T1 is 55.08% faster than T2 means .6053 = (1-.5508)*1.3477. (Here ‘faster than’ means the same as ‘smaller than’ in a size context rather than a speed one) You would've put an x for whatever you wanted to solve for. T2 is 122.65% slower than T1 means 1.3477 = (1+x)*.6053 => x = 1.2265 as an example solving for x. (Here ‘slower than’ is similar to ‘larger than’). Think about it--T2 is more than 100% slower because even halving T2 is still larger than T1. The semantics can be confusing. PS--twice as fast means 100% smaller than Dec 9, 2014 at 6:48
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    Answer from Darryl is wrong, as (0.6053/1.3477) * 100 = 44.9% does not mean it is 44.9% faster, just that the numerator is 44.9% of the denominator. so for example we can see that if time 1 was 0.2 and time 2 was 0.8, then time 1 would be 4 times faster than time 2. (not 25% faster if using the same calculation provided by Darryl). I would also suggest looking at this: math.stackexchange.com/questions/1227389/…
    – user2827968
    Jan 10, 2017 at 21:38
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    44.9% slower, right? because this is only seconds, meaning that it took longer time (T2 > T1) to do the same task.
    – Jaider
    Jul 17, 2017 at 18:24
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    @Jaider - You confused me for a moment but you're incorrect. If T1=0.6sec and T2=1.3sec and the question is "What percentage faster is Time1 to Time2?", then the answer is "T1 is __% faster than T2" ... (or, you could say T2 is __% slower than T1." ...However I have issue with the question itself.
    – ashleedawg
    Jun 4, 2018 at 5:18

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