15

I am using PHP 5.3.

On my 32-bit system the size of an INT:

print "PHP_INT_MAX: " . PHP_INT_MAX . "\n";
print "PHP_INT_SIZE: " . PHP_INT_SIZE . " bytes (" . (PHP_INT_SIZE * 8) . " bits)\n";
  • PHP_INT_MAX: 2147483647
  • PHP_INT_SIZE: 4 bytes (32 bits)

However, part of an an encoding algorithm I am using relies on the fact that an int is the above size (4 bytes). When I run the code on my web host's server, it is a 64-bit system and the int size is twice as large.

Is there a way to force "(int)" cast to use the 32-bit size?

For example, assume the following code:

$test = 4170266799;
print $test;                     
print (int) $test;

On my 32-bit system, the output is:

4170266799
-124700497

On my 64-bit system, the output is:

4170266799
4170266799

Is it possible to force the value of an INT to be 4 bytes, even when the architecture changes from 32-bit to 64-bit?

  • 7
    I would fix the encoding algorithm... – Karoly Horvath Nov 14 '11 at 22:05
  • 1
    Is this an instance of the XY Problem? What problem are you really trying to solve? – user212218 Nov 16 '11 at 4:58
  • No, it is not an instance of the XY problem. I am converting portions of a large code base written in native compiled code. Part of that I am moving to PHP to be accessed from the web, however it must generate information in the same manner expected by my 32-bit application. That is why I rely on the INT size. I am choosing to do as close a conversion as possible instead of redesigning the logic to generate the same results. Fortunately, I now have it working. – Mick Nov 16 '11 at 14:33
  • @Mick, you can always use a pre-compiler that does the modification for you. – Pacerier Jun 6 '13 at 15:16
4

No, this is very much dependant upon the platform itself:

The size of an integer is platform-dependent, although a maximum value of about two billion is the usual value (that's 32 bits signed). 64-bit platforms usually have a maximum value of about 9E18. PHP does not support unsigned integers.

And because the values that expose the integer size and integer maximum are constants, they can't be changed - being determined at compile-time of PHP based on the current system.

Not much consolation, but this is why relying on something such as a constant (that isn't yours to change, and is subject to change per build), or any kind of "sizeof` implementations are just as evil as magic numbers in code - don't do it. One thing that we can be sure of (at least, I hope!) is that 4 is and always will be 4, but not that x, y, or z will represent 4, even if they do now.

  • 1
    Thank you for your response. You are correct that I cannot change the size of an INT in PHP. Fortunately, I have found a way to "cast" an INT to the size I expect on a 32-bit system, even when my code is running on a 64-bit system. – Mick Nov 15 '11 at 2:57
  • Do tell us how, Mick. – A.Grandt Nov 1 '15 at 12:21
4

Referencing this question on Stack Overflow, I have found a solution that seems to work in my early tests:

function thirtyTwoBitIntval($value)
{                  
    if ($value < -2147483648)
    {
    return -(-($value) & 0xFFFFFFFF);
    }
    elseif ($value > 2147483647)
    {
        return ($value & 0xFFFFFFFF);
    }
    return $value;
}


$test = 4170266799;
print $test;                     
print (int) $test;
print thirtyTwoBitIntval($test);

And the output on the 32-bit system is:

4170266799  # $test = 4170266799
-124700497  # (int) $test
-124700497  # thirtyTwoBitIntval($test);

And the output on the 64-bit system is:

4170266799  # $test = 4170266799
4170266799  # (int) $test
-124700497  # thirtyTwoBitIntval($test);

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.