The following simple program retrieves the current year (2011) from the system and then simply subtracts 1950 from the current year.

package calculation;

import java.util.Calendar;

final public class Main
{
    private static final Main INSTANCE = new Main();
    private static final int CURRENT_YEAR = Calendar.getInstance().get(Calendar.YEAR);
    private final int beltSize=CURRENT_YEAR - 1950;

    private int beltSize()
    {
        return beltSize;
    }
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        Main  main=new Main();
        System.out.println("Wears a size " + main.beltSize() + " belt.");
        System.out.println("Wears a size " + INSTANCE.beltSize() + " belt.");
    }
}

The following statement from the code above returns a correct value.

Main  main=new Main();

System.out.println("Wears a size " + main.beltSize() + " belt.");

It invokes the beltSize() method which returns correctly the evaluation of CURRENT_YEAR - 1950 which is 61.


private static final Main INSTANCE = new Main();

System.out.println("Wears a size " + INSTANCE.beltSize() + " belt.");

The above statement invokes the same method beltSize() using the static final object INSTANCE which is a class member and it returns incorrectly -1950 (negative) rather than the correct value of 61. Why?

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Order of evaluation matters for static variables. so change the order as

private static final int CURRENT_YEAR = Calendar.getInstance().get(Calendar.YEAR);
private static final Main INSTANCE = new Main();   // order of evaluation matters for static variables

Since INSTANCE has evaluated before CURRENT_YEAR, the default value of CURRENT_YEAR (0) has taken.

  • That is not nice. Especially for final variables. – Thilo Nov 15 '11 at 5:16
  • 1
    @Thilo - it is true that it is not nice. However, the Java language designers had little choice. The alternative ... detection of pathological static initialization orders ... can't be done without analysis of all of the classes that an application uses. So the JLS states that it is possible to see a final in its pre-initialized state, and that its value in that state is zero or null. – Stephen C Nov 15 '11 at 6:16

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