26

should be an easy one. I originally was gonna do this in javascript but have to do it prior to setting to the form in my handler page. Anyway I need to make these values have 2 decimal places. Ex 219333.5888888 needs to be 219333.58. Is there a trim function or something?

 form.setUnitRepairCost(Double.toString(jobPlanBean.getUnitTotalCost()));   //UNIT REPAIR COST
 form.setUnitMaterialCost(Double.toString(jobPlanBean.getUnitTotalMaterialCost())); //UNIT MATERIAL COST
  • 1
    * 100, cast to int, divide by 100.0? – Draco Ater Nov 15 '11 at 13:44
  • 1
    haha..it is the first one...nice – Doc Holiday Nov 15 '11 at 13:45

11 Answers 11

47

here is the simple example to format the decimal value

import java.text.*;

public class DecimalPlaces {

    public static void main(String[] args) {

        double d = 1.234567;
        DecimalFormat df = new DecimalFormat("#.##");
        System.out.print(df.format(d));
    }

}
  • 1
    What if you want the number as a double still? Just convert it back? – mikato Apr 9 '13 at 21:01
  • Hmm actually this doesn't work since DecimalFormat does rounding. API says - "DecimalFormat provides rounding modes defined in RoundingMode for formatting. By default, it uses RoundingMode.HALF_EVEN". You'd have to change the rounding mode to do that. Or you could DecimalFormat to one more decimal place and then cut it off in the String after formatting. Terrible. Anything that isn't a kludge? – mikato Apr 9 '13 at 21:27
  • 8
    Why this is the accepted answer? The original question was "219333.5888888 needs to be 219333.58".. but this given solution (as @mikato wrotes right) leads to 219333.59. DecimalFormat.setRoundingMode() needs to be set to RoundingMode.FLOOR; – flipperweid Dec 15 '16 at 14:29
11
public static void main(String[] args) {

        double d = 6.3546;
        DecimalFormat df = new DecimalFormat("#.##");
        System.out.print(df.format(d));
}
7

For getting a double back and not a string:

double d = 80.123;
DecimalFormat df = new DecimalFormat("#.##");
double p = Double.parseDouble(df.format(d));
6

multiply the double by 100.0 and cast this to an int then take that int and cast it to a double and divide by 100.0

    int temp = (int)(longDouble*100.0);
    double shortDouble = ((double)temp)/100.0;
  • Fast and easy to remember. Mine solution is value = ((double)((int)(value *100.0)))/100.0; – Marco Fantasia Feb 13 '17 at 11:56
3

How about:

new java.text.DecimalFormat("0.00").format( yourNumber );
  • Or the link given by TheStijn. – cjstehno Nov 15 '11 at 13:45
2

Here is String manipulation to truncate double value up to tow decimal places.

public static String truncateUptoTwoDecimal(double doubleValue) {
    String value = String.valueOf(doubleValue);
    if (value != null) {
        String result = value;
        int decimalIndex = result.indexOf(".");
        if (decimalIndex != -1) {
            String decimalString = result.substring(decimalIndex + 1);
            if (decimalString.length() > 2) {
                result = value.substring(0, decimalIndex + 3);
            } else if (decimalString.length() == 1) {
                result = String.format(Locale.ENGLISH, "%.2f",
                        Double.parseDouble(value));
            }
        }
        return result;
    }
    return null;
}
  • 1
    Nice answer , as the other approaches does not clear it that what about number of digits before dot. – shridutt kothari Jun 24 '16 at 5:56
1

Yes, DecimalFormat: http://www.exampledepot.com/egs/java.text/FormatNum.html

1

Look into using a Decimal Format :

DecimalFormat twoDForm = new DecimalFormat("#.##");

  • hey...thanks my brother – Doc Holiday Nov 15 '11 at 13:49
1

DecimalFormat Class

0
public static double truncateDecimals(double d, int len) {
    long p = pow(10, len);
    long l = (long)(d * p);
    return (double)l / (double)p;
}

public static long pow(long a, int b) {
    long result = 1;
    for (int i = 1; i <= b; i++) {
       result *= a;
    }
    return result;
}
  • Why should the OP "try this code"? A good answer will always have an explanation of what was done and why it was done in such a manner, not only for the OP but for future visitors to SO. – B001ᛦ Feb 2 '17 at 9:49
0

By using those two methods you can handle all the exceptions also :

private String convertedBalance(String balance){
    String convertedBalance = balance.toString();
    Double d;
    try {`enter code here`
        d = Double.parseDouble(balance.toString());
        Log.i("ConvertedNumber", "d (amount) = "+d.toString());
        d = round(d, 2);

        DecimalFormat f = new DecimalFormat("0.00");
        convertedBalance = f.format(d);

        Log.i("ConvertedNumber", "convertedBalance = "+convertedBalance);

    }catch (NumberFormatException e){
        Log.i("ConvertedNumber", "Number format exception");
    }

    return convertedBalance;
}


public static double round(double value, int places) {
    if (places < 0) throw new IllegalArgumentException();

    BigDecimal bd = new BigDecimal(value);
    bd = bd.setScale(places, RoundingMode.HALF_UP);
    return bd.doubleValue();
}

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