9

I'd like to copy values that match a predicate (equal ints) from a map<string,int> to a vector<int>.

This is what I tried:

#include <map>
#include <vector>
#include <algorithm>

int main()
{
    std::vector< int > v;
    std::map< std::string, int > m;

    m[ "1" ] = 1;
    m[ "2" ] = 2;
    m[ "3" ] = 3;
    m[ "4" ] = 4;
    m[ "5" ] = 5;

    std::copy_if( m.begin(), m.end(), v.begin(),
                  [] ( const std::pair< std::string,int > &it )
                  {
                    return ( 0 == ( it.second % 2 ) );
                  }
                  );
}

The error message from g++ 4.6.1 is :

error: cannot convert 'std::pair<const std::basic_string<char>, int>' to 'int' in assignment

Is there a way to adjust the example to do the above copy?

1
  • 1
    This is an excellent question that's I'm surprised isn't asked more often. Nov 15, 2011 at 15:02

6 Answers 6

13

With boost::range it is as easy as:

boost::push_back(
    v,
    m | boost::adaptors::map_values 
      | boost::adaptors::filtered([](int val){ return 0 == (val % 2); }));
6
  • 6
    boost::range needs more love. The simple pipeline concept is just too good to pass in programming. Nov 15, 2011 at 15:17
  • 2
    boost::copy + std::back_inserter is quite ugly. If you use boost.range then boost::push_back(v, m | map_values | filtered([](int val){ return 0 == (val % 2); })); is clearer and shorter IMHO. Nov 15, 2011 at 20:51
  • This also seams to be the optimal solution (regarding the speed). Nov 15, 2011 at 21:16
  • @ThomasPetit: Yeah, I forgot about that one! Fixed.
    – Mankarse
    Nov 16, 2011 at 1:44
  • Just a small question : it should be boost::mpl::push_back, no? Nov 18, 2011 at 7:56
12

Problem

The copy fails because you're copying from a map::iterator which iterates over pair<string const,int> to a vector::iterator which iterates over int.

Solution

Replace copy_if with for_each and do a push_back on your vector.

Example

std::for_each( m.begin(), m.end(),
    [&v] ( std::pair< std::string const,int > const&it ) {
        if ( 0 == ( it.second % 2 ) ) {
            v.push_back(it.second);
        }
    }
);
5
  • 3
    Instead of writing a loop and pushing each element back by hand, use transform. That's what it's for. Nov 15, 2011 at 14:43
  • 1
    @JohnDibling: How would you do the even-number filtering with transform? AFAIK it is one-to-one, so you always get the same number of elements in input and output.
    – Kleist
    Nov 15, 2011 at 14:46
  • @Kleist: Use transform_if. See my answer. Nov 15, 2011 at 14:58
  • 2
    You need to modify your lambda capture clause to [&v] in order to access the vector in the enclosing scope. Nov 15, 2011 at 15:05
  • 1
    "The copy fails because you're copying from a map::iterator which iterates over pair<string,int>" No, it iterates over pair<string const, int> -- the key type of an associative container is always const.
    – ildjarn
    Nov 15, 2011 at 20:25
5

The compiler error is actually quite succinct:

error: cannot convert 'std::pair<const std::basic_string<char>, int>' to 'int' in assignment

And that's exactly what the problem is. The map you're copying from has iterators that dereference to a pair<KEY,VALUE>, and there's no way to implicitly transform a pair<KEY,VALUE> to just a VALUE.

Because of this, you can't use copy or copy_if to copy from a map to a vector; but the Standard Library does provide an algorithm you can use, creatively called transform. transform is very similar to copy in that it takes two source iterators and a destination iterator. The difference is transform also takes a unary function that does the actual transformation. Using a C++11 lambda, you can copy the entire contents of a map to a vector like this:

transform( m.begin(), m.end(), back_inserter(v), [] (const MyMap::value_type& vt)
{
  return vt.second;
});

What if you don't want to copy the entire contents of the map, but only some elements meeting certian criteria? Simple, just use transform_if.

What's that, you say? There is no transform_if in the Standard Library? Well yeah, you do have a point there. Frustratingly, there is no transform_if in the Standard Library. However writing one is a simple enough task. Here's the code:

template<class InputIterator, class OutputIterator, class UnaryFunction, class Predicate>
OutputIterator transform_if(InputIterator first, 
                            InputIterator last, 
                            OutputIterator result, 
                            UnaryFunction f, 
                            Predicate pred)
{
    for (; first != last; ++first)
    {
        if( pred(*first) )
            *result++ = f(*first);
    }
    return result; 
}

As you might expect, using transform_if is like taking copy_if and mashing it together with transform. Here's some psudo-code to demonstrate:

transform_if( m.begin(), m.end(), back_inserter(v),
  [] (const MyMap::value_type& vt) // The UnaryFunction takes a pair<K,V> and returns a V
  {
    return vt.second;
  }, [] (const MyMap::value_type& vt) // The predicate returns true if this item should be copied
  {
     return 0 == (vt.second%2);
  } );
2
  • 2
    It is shorter. The transformation from map-elements to map-values occurs through a named library call, and the filtering is done on the result of that transformation (rather than repeating the transformation). The whole code is composed of simple orthogonal elements, instead of using a monolithic transform_if function which does multiple things at once. It avoids the need to specify multiple iterators for a single input range.
    – Mankarse
    Nov 15, 2011 at 15:15
  • 1
    And this is where views are sorely missed. If we only had a filter_view then it would be as simple as chaining the filtering and the transform operation. Nov 15, 2011 at 15:15
2

std::copy_if won't allow you to transfer from one type to another, only to filter what to copy.

You could use std::transform to get rid of the key and then use std::remove_if:

  std::vector<int> v;
  std::transform(m.begin(), m.end(), std::back_inserter(v),
                  [] ( const std::pair< std::string,int > &it )
                  {
                    return it.second;
                  });
  v.erase(
      std::remove_if(
          v.begin(), v.end(), [](const int value){ return (value % 2) != 0; }),
      v.end());

However, a plain for loop would be more efficient and a lot easier to read.

1
  • 1
    Better, but transform_if would be better still. See my answer. Nov 15, 2011 at 14:59
2

I cannot understand why the simple for loop solution is not the preferred approach, for this problem

for (std::map< std::string, int >::iterator it = m.begin(); it != m.end(); ++it )
{
   if ((it->second % 2) == 0)
      v.push_back(it->second);
}

Except that it makes the code more readable it performs better. I wrote a simple benchmark to see how a for loop performs compared to the other proposed solutions:

#include <iostream>
#include <map>
#include <vector>
#include <algorithm>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <time.h>
#include <sstream>

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    std::map< std::string, int > m;
    std::vector<int> v;

    // Fill the map with random values...
    srand ( time(NULL) );

    for (unsigned i=0; i<10000; ++i)
    {
      int r = rand();
      std::stringstream out;
      out << r;
      std::string s = out.str();

      m[s] = r;
    } 

    /////////// FOR EACH ////////////////////

    clock_t start1 = clock();
    for (unsigned k=0; k<10000; k++)
    {
      v.clear();
      std::for_each( m.begin(), m.end(),
      [&v] ( const std::pair< std::string,int > &it ) {
      if ( 0 == ( it.second % 2 ) ) {
          v.push_back(it.second);
      }
      }
      );
    }
    clock_t end1=clock();
    std::cout << "Execution Time for_each : " << (end1-start1) << std::endl;

    /////////// TRANSFORM ////////////////////

    clock_t start2 = clock();
    for (unsigned k=0; k<10000; k++)
    {
      v.clear();
      std::transform(m.begin(), m.end(), std::back_inserter(v),
            [] ( const std::pair< std::string,int > &it )
            {
              return it.second;
            });
      v.erase(
    std::remove_if(
        v.begin(), v.end(), [](const int value){ return (value % 2) != 0; }),
    v.end());
    }
    clock_t end2 = clock();
    std::cout << "Execution Time transform : " << (end2-start2) << std::endl;


     /////////// SIMPLE FOR LOOP ////////////////////
    clock_t start3 = clock();
    for (unsigned k=0; k<10000; k++)
    {
      v.clear();
      for (std::map< std::string, int >::iterator it = m.begin(); it != m.end(); ++it )
      {
    if ((it->second % 2) == 0)
      v.push_back(it->second);
      }
    }
    clock_t end3=clock();
    std::cout << "Execution Time Simple For Loop : " << (end3-start3) << std::endl;

}

The results I got are the following:

Execution Time for_each : 7330000
Execution Time transform : 11090000
Execution Time Simple For Loop : 6530000
3
  • This does not do the filtering (( 0 == ( it.second % 2 ) )).
    – larsmoa
    Nov 15, 2011 at 14:36
  • You didn't enable optimization. Your numbers are right for default settings, but once you enable optimization, the numbers are quite comparable. If you are using g++, use -O3. With optimization enabled, I got the version using transform the fastest Nov 15, 2011 at 21:08
  • With Optimization i still get better results for the for loop for_each : 3890000 transform : 4000000 For Loop : 2940000
    – pnezis
    Nov 15, 2011 at 21:49
0

Presumably you just want to retrieve the associated values from the map, not the keys.

The SGI version of STL has select1st and select2nd iterators for this kind of task.

Personally, however, I don't think this should really be done with copy -- you're transforming the data, not copying it. As such, I'd advise using std::transform with a functor to return the second item in the pair.

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