7

I just stumbled over a very interesting problem. Giving the following code:

using System;

class Program
{
    class A { }
    class B : A { }

    private static void MyMethod(A a) /* first method */
    {
        Console.WriteLine("A"); ;
    }

    private static void MyMethod(B b) /* second method */
    {
        Console.WriteLine("B");
    }

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var a = new A();
        // Call first method
        MyMethod(a);

        A b = new B();
        // Should call the second method
        MyMethod(b);

        Console.ReadLine();
    }
}

I would expect that the second method will be called because the runtime type of the variable is B. Any ideas why the code calls the first method instead?

Thanks, Tibi

Some clarifications: Polymorphism means several forms which has nothing to do where you declare the method.

Method overloading is a form of polymorphism, ad-hoc polymorphism.

The way polymorphism is normally implemented by using late binding.

dynamic is the workaround for this problem.

The fact is that this is not working in C#(or Java) it is a design decission which I would like to understand why was made, and none of the answers is answering this question.

/Tibi

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  • 4
    This isn't polymorphism, you have two overloaded instances of the same method, each taking different types as parameters. Then you declare "b" as A. The compiler lets you do this because B inherits A. – Maess Nov 15 '11 at 18:51
6

Method overloading in C#, by default, is determined statically at compile time. Since you are passing a statically typed variable of type A, it will statically bind to method with the A overload. Use the dynamic keyword to get the behavior you want.

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    dynamic d = new A();
    // Call first method
    MyMethod(d);

    d = new B();
    // Call the second method
    MyMethod(d);

    Console.ReadLine();
}
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  • I didn't think about that! Thanks. – Tibi Nov 15 '11 at 19:30
  • I actually wasn't aware that the dynamic keyword causes calls to overloaded methods to resolve at runtime either, this is handy to know. I'm curious as to the potential performance issues with this kind of late binding though. – Bradley Uffner Nov 15 '11 at 19:41
  • 1
    I would guess that you will incurr some performance hits the first time you call it with a new parameter type as it needs to be resolved, but then is cached by the DLR. – Tibi Nov 15 '11 at 19:46
14

This isn't an example of polymorphism at all. Polymorphism comes in to play when you call methods ON the object, not when the object is used as a parameter. This is just a simple example of method overloading.

You declared b as being of type A, so the compiler is going to link to the overload that uses type A. The linker doesn't care that B is a subclass of A, it just picks the overload with the closest signature to the declared types (not the actual types) of the parameters passed in.

if you want to force it to use the 2nd method, cast b in to type B in the method call.

MyMethod((B)b);
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  • Indeed. The same thing happens in Java. Expected behavior. – EdH Nov 15 '11 at 18:55
  • In a more complex situation casting would just make the code ugly. Anyway, I would expect the linker to care about the type of the parameter and use late binding instead. – Tibi Nov 15 '11 at 18:57
  • 1
    If you want it to behave that way you should put the DoSomething sub on A, and override it in B. Then when you call b.DoSomething() it will pick the correct one based on the actual type. – Bradley Uffner Nov 15 '11 at 19:06
  • I would do that, but the problem will be that I will have to create one class with only one method for every overload. – Tibi Nov 15 '11 at 19:47
  • That might indicate that there is a weakness somewhere in your application design. Keep in mind that the dynamic keyword you selected as the answer was only recently made available in C#. In earlier versions it was not an option. There should be some well established design patterns out there that might be able to solve your particular problem more cleanly without resorting to late binding. – Bradley Uffner Nov 15 '11 at 19:56
0

It's not calling the second method because the reference to b itself is of type A. While b contains a reference to an instance of B, that is not an actual type of B, so the overload that uses an A reference is chosen.

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  • I understand exactly what it does, I just don't understand why. – Tibi Nov 15 '11 at 19:01
  • 1
    Method calls are resolved at compile time. (dynamic types' methods excluded) That is why. – recursive Nov 15 '11 at 19:23
  • 1
    @Tibi: That is false. Dynamic methods are resolved at runtime, static methods are resolved at compile time. Polymorphism has nothing to do with static versus dynamic resolution. On top of that, methods aren't polymorphic unless they are defined on the member. This is method overloading, not polymorphism. – John Gietzen Nov 15 '11 at 20:17

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