28

In javascript, how to I do a right trim?

I have the following:

    var s1 = "this is a test~";

     var s = s1.rtrim('~') 

but was not successful

64

Use a RegExp. Don't forget to escape special characters.

s1 = s1.replace(/~+$/, ''); //$ marks the end of a string
                            // ~+$ means: all ~ characters at the end of a string
  • Perfect, thanks! – Michael-O Mar 15 '13 at 15:09
  • 1
    If you want to trim whitespace do s1 = s1.replace(/\s+$/, '') – Mark Kuczmarski Jul 23 '18 at 6:13
4

You can modify the String prototype if you like. Modifying the String prototype is generally frowned upon, but I personally prefer this method, as it makes the code cleaner IMHO.

String.prototype.rtrim = function(s) { 
    return this.replace(new RegExp(s + "*$"),''); 
};

Then call...

var s1 = "this is a test~";
var s = s1.rtrim('~');
alert(s); 
  • It's frowned upon for a reason. Don't do this! – Evert Jan 4 at 19:59
3

There are no trim, ltrim, or rtrim functions in Javascript. Many libraries provide them, but generally they will look something like:

str.replace(/~*$/, '');

For right trims, the following is generally faster than a regex because of how regex deals with end characters in most browsers:

function rtrim(str, ch)
{
    for (i = str.length - 1; i >= 0; i--)
    {
        if (ch != str.charAt(i))
        {
            str = str.substring(0, i + 1);
            break;
        }
    } 
    return str;
}
2

A solution using a regular expression:

"hi there~".replace(/~*$/, "")
2

IMO this is the best way to do a right/left trim and therefore, having a full functionality for trimming (since javascript supports string.trim natively)

String.prototype.rtrim = function (s) {
    if (s == undefined)
        s = '\\s';
    return this.replace(new RegExp("[" + s + "]*$"), '');
};
String.prototype.ltrim = function (s) {
    if (s == undefined)
        s = '\\s';
    return this.replace(new RegExp("^[" + s + "]*"), '');
};

Usage example:

var str1 = '   jav '
var r1 = mystring.trim();      // result = 'jav'
var r2 = mystring.rtrim();     // result = '   jav'
var r3 = mystring.rtrim(' v'); // result = '   ja'
var r4 = mystring.ltrim();     // result = 'jav '
-1

This is old, I know. But I don't see what's wrong with substr...?

function rtrim(str, length) {
  return str.substr(0, str.length - length);
}
  • 1
    The only problem here is that there could be any number of characters at the end of the string... say instead of this is test~ they happened to have this is test~~~ or even none this is test. Your case does however work nicely for trimming a set number of characters from the string, regardless of what the character may be – bobkingof12vs Apr 10 '15 at 21:40

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