1

Consider the following example:

interface IPropertyCollection
{
    public MethodWrapper GetPropertySetterByName(string name);
    //<<-- I want the implementation from A and B merged into here somehow
}
class A : IPropertyCollection
{
    static PropertyMap properties = new PropertyMap(typeof(A));
    public MethodWrapper GetPropertySetterByName(string name)
    {
        return properties.SomeFunc(name);
    }
}
class B : IPropertyCollection
{
    static PropertyMap properties = new PropertyMap(typeof(B));
    public MethodWrapper GetPropertySetterByName(string name)
    {
        return properties.SomeFunc(name);
    }
}

I want to have a static member in each class keeping track of things in that class only and i want it to behave exactly the same for every class, but with different content. Each static member should only keep track of one single class. I want to be able to get access to the classes' static member by just having an instance of any IPropertyCollection.

Something like this:

    IPropertyCollection a = new A();
    IPropertyCollection b = new B();
    a.GetPropertySetterByName("asdfsj");  //Should end up in static A.properties 
    b.GetPropertySetterByName("asdfsj");  //Should end up in static B.properties 

Now this will work with my example code but i don't want to repeat all those lines inside A and B and 50 other classes.

  • "Static instance methods" is contradictory. It's either static or instance. What you really mean is that you want a static member that will be initialized dependent on the sub-class, right? – James Michael Hare Nov 15 '11 at 20:36
  • 1
    Seems to me as good candidate for abstract class. – Tomas Voracek Nov 15 '11 at 20:38
6

Use a (curiously recurring) generic common base class:

abstract class Base<T> : IPropertyCollection where T : Base<T> {
  static PropertyMap properties = new PropertyMap(typeof(T));
  public MethodWrapper GetPropertySetterByName(string name) {
      return properties.SomeFunc(name);
  }
}

class A : Base<A> { }
class B : Base<B> { }

Since the base class is generic, a different "version" of its static members will be "generated" for each different type parameter.

Just be careful with evil dogs :-)

class Evil : Base<A> { } // will share A's static member...
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4

Static members can't be inherited. They belong to the class they are declared on.

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  • do you know why I was notified on your comment? I certainly didn't downvote, and my name isn't Downvoter. Is "Downvoter" a special value that mass notifies everyone attached to the comment stream? – Adam Rackis Nov 15 '11 at 20:59
  • @AdamRackis - No, it isn't. You probably got notified because you were the only commenter, the system assumed I was asking you... – Oded Nov 15 '11 at 21:02

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