39

I'm trying to pass data from one page to another.

www.mints.com?name=something

How to read name using JavaScript?

56
function parseURLParams(url) {
    var queryStart = url.indexOf("?") + 1,
        queryEnd   = url.indexOf("#") + 1 || url.length + 1,
        query = url.slice(queryStart, queryEnd - 1),
        pairs = query.replace(/\+/g, " ").split("&"),
        parms = {}, i, n, v, nv;

    if (query === url || query === "") return;

    for (i = 0; i < pairs.length; i++) {
        nv = pairs[i].split("=", 2);
        n = decodeURIComponent(nv[0]);
        v = decodeURIComponent(nv[1]);

        if (!parms.hasOwnProperty(n)) parms[n] = [];
        parms[n].push(nv.length === 2 ? v : null);
    }
    return parms;
}

Use as follows:

var urlString = "http://www.foo.com/bar?a=a+a&b%20b=b&c=1&c=2&d#hash";
    urlParams = parseURLParams(urlString);

which returns a an object like this:

{
  "a"  : ["a a"],     /* param values are always returned as arrays */
  "b b": ["b"],       /* param names can have special chars as well */
  "c"  : ["1", "2"]   /* an URL param can occur multiple times!     */
  "d"  : [null]       /* parameters without values are set to null  */ 
} 

So

parseURLParams("www.mints.com?name=something")

gives

{name: ["something"]}

EDIT: The original version of this answer used a regex-based approach to URL-parsing. It used a shorter function, but the approach was flawed and I replaced it with a proper parser.

  • My apologies, i'm no professional javascripter! :) – Web_Designer Jan 17 '12 at 7:14
  • @Tomalak can you please tell me the way to print the value of name? i am trying to use this script and when i use document.write(urlParams); it gives me [object Object] but i dont get the actual value.. Can you help me with this please? – Kiran Vemuri Jun 27 '13 at 21:33
  • @KiranVemuri: Try console.log(JSON.stringify(urlParams)) – NJInamdar Sep 26 '14 at 7:13
  • 1
    Well getting only the key is actually very easy, I did - for(var a in parms) { console.log(a); } This only returned the key. – Chinmay Sarupria Aug 13 '16 at 5:22
  • 2
    If anyone was still wondering how to get the data from urlParams the syntax is: urlParams["name"][0] which would return: "something" – Garret Kaye Mar 6 '17 at 15:25
6

I think this should also work:

function $_GET(q,s) {
    s = (s) ? s : window.location.search;
    var re = new RegExp('&amp;'+q+'=([^&amp;]*)','i');
    return (s=s.replace(/^\?/,'&amp;').match(re)) ?s=s[1] :s='';
}

Just call it like this:

var value = $_GET('myvariable');
3

location.search https://developer.mozilla.org/en/DOM/window.location

although most use some kind of parsing routine to read query string parameters.

here's one http://safalra.com/web-design/javascript/parsing-query-strings/

3

Here's one solution. Of course, this function doesn't need to load into a "window.params" option -- that can be customized.

window.params = function(){
    var params = {};
    var param_array = window.location.href.split('?')[1].split('&');
    for(var i in param_array){
        x = param_array[i].split('=');
        params[x[0]] = x[1];
    }
    return params;
}();

Example API call on http://www.mints.com/myurl.html?name=something&goal=true:

if(window.params.name == 'something') doStuff();
else if( window.params.goal == 'true') shoutGOOOOOAAALLL();
3

It’s 2019 and there is no need for any hand-written solution or third-party library. If you want to parse the URL of current page in browser:

# running on https://www.example.com?name=n1&name=n2
let params = new URLSearchParams(location.search);
params.get('name') # => "n1"
params.getAll('name') # => ["n1", "n2"]

If you want to parse a random URL, either in browser or in Node.js:

let url = 'https://www.example.com?name=n1&name=n2';
let params = (new URL(url)).searchParams;
params.get('name') # => "n1"
params.getAll('name') # => ["n1", "n2"]

It’s making use of the URLSearchParams interface that comes with modern browsers.

1

Iv'e fixed/improved Tomalak's answer with:

  • Make an Array only if needed.
  • If there's another equation symbol in the value it gets inside the value
  • It now uses the location.search value instead of a url.
  • Empty search string results in an empty object.

Code:

function getSearchObject() {
    if (location.search === "") return {};

    var o = {},
        nvPairs = location.search.substr(1).replace(/\+/g, " ").split("&");

    nvPairs.forEach( function (pair) {
        var e = pair.indexOf('=');
        var n = decodeURIComponent(e < 0 ? pair : pair.substr(0,e)),
            v = (e < 0 || e + 1 == pair.length) 
                ? null : 
                decodeURIComponent(pair.substr(e + 1,pair.length - e));
        if (!(n in o))
            o[n] = v;
        else if (o[n] instanceof Array)
            o[n].push(v);
        else
            o[n] = [o[n] , v];
    });
    return o;
}
1

The currently selected answer did not work well at all in my case, which I feel is a fairly typical one. I found the below function here and it works great!

function getAllUrlParams(url) {

  // get query string from url (optional) or window
  var queryString = url ? url.split('?')[1] : window.location.search.slice(1);

  // we'll store the parameters here
  var obj = {};

  // if query string exists
  if (queryString) {

    // stuff after # is not part of query string, so get rid of it
    queryString = queryString.split('#')[0];

    // split our query string into its component parts
    var arr = queryString.split('&');

    for (var i=0; i<arr.length; i++) {
      // separate the keys and the values
      var a = arr[i].split('=');

      // in case params look like: list[]=thing1&list[]=thing2
      var paramNum = undefined;
      var paramName = a[0].replace(/\[\d*\]/, function(v) {
        paramNum = v.slice(1,-1);
        return '';
      });

      // set parameter value (use 'true' if empty)
      var paramValue = typeof(a[1])==='undefined' ? true : a[1];

      // (optional) keep case consistent
      paramName = paramName.toLowerCase();
      paramValue = paramValue.toLowerCase();

      // if parameter name already exists
      if (obj[paramName]) {
        // convert value to array (if still string)
        if (typeof obj[paramName] === 'string') {
          obj[paramName] = [obj[paramName]];
        }
        // if no array index number specified...
        if (typeof paramNum === 'undefined') {
          // put the value on the end of the array
          obj[paramName].push(paramValue);
        }
        // if array index number specified...
        else {
          // put the value at that index number
          obj[paramName][paramNum] = paramValue;
        }
      }
      // if param name doesn't exist yet, set it
      else {
        obj[paramName] = paramValue;
      }
    }
  }

  return obj;
}
  • same here, this one work like a charm – Plastic Jan 2 '18 at 13:49
0

I also made a fairly simple function. You call on it by: get("yourgetname");

and get whatever there was. (now that i wrote it i noticed it will give you %26 if you had a & in your value..)

function get(name){
  var url = window.location.search;
  var num = url.search(name);
  var namel = name.length;
  var frontlength = namel+num+1; //length of everything before the value 
  var front = url.substring(0, frontlength);  
  url = url.replace(front, "");  
  num = url.search("&");

 if(num>=0) return url.substr(0,num); 
 if(num<0)  return url;             
}

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