I have this code that doesn't work, but I think the intent is clear:

testmakeshared.cpp

#include <memory>

class A {
 public:
   static ::std::shared_ptr<A> create() {
      return ::std::make_shared<A>();
   }

 protected:
   A() {}
   A(const A &) = delete;
   const A &operator =(const A &) = delete;
};

::std::shared_ptr<A> foo()
{
   return A::create();
}

But I get this error when I compile it:

g++ -std=c++0x -march=native -mtune=native -O3 -Wall testmakeshared.cpp
In file included from /usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-redhat-linux/4.6.1/../../../../include/c++/4.6.1/bits/shared_ptr.h:52:0,
                 from /usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-redhat-linux/4.6.1/../../../../include/c++/4.6.1/memory:86,
                 from testmakeshared.cpp:1:
testmakeshared.cpp: In constructor ‘std::_Sp_counted_ptr_inplace<_Tp, _Alloc, _Lp>::_Sp_counted_ptr_inplace(_Alloc) [with _Tp = A, _Alloc = std::allocator<A>, __gnu_cxx::_Lock_policy _Lp = (__gnu_cxx::_Lock_policy)2u]’:
/usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-redhat-linux/4.6.1/../../../../include/c++/4.6.1/bits/shared_ptr_base.h:518:8:   instantiated from ‘std::__shared_count<_Lp>::__shared_count(std::_Sp_make_shared_tag, _Tp*, const _Alloc&, _Args&& ...) [with _Tp = A, _Alloc = std::allocator<A>, _Args = {}, __gnu_cxx::_Lock_policy _Lp = (__gnu_cxx::_Lock_policy)2u]’
/usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-redhat-linux/4.6.1/../../../../include/c++/4.6.1/bits/shared_ptr_base.h:986:35:   instantiated from ‘std::__shared_ptr<_Tp, _Lp>::__shared_ptr(std::_Sp_make_shared_tag, const _Alloc&, _Args&& ...) [with _Alloc = std::allocator<A>, _Args = {}, _Tp = A, __gnu_cxx::_Lock_policy _Lp = (__gnu_cxx::_Lock_policy)2u]’
/usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-redhat-linux/4.6.1/../../../../include/c++/4.6.1/bits/shared_ptr.h:313:64:   instantiated from ‘std::shared_ptr<_Tp>::shared_ptr(std::_Sp_make_shared_tag, const _Alloc&, _Args&& ...) [with _Alloc = std::allocator<A>, _Args = {}, _Tp = A]’
/usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-redhat-linux/4.6.1/../../../../include/c++/4.6.1/bits/shared_ptr.h:531:39:   instantiated from ‘std::shared_ptr<_Tp> std::allocate_shared(const _Alloc&, _Args&& ...) [with _Tp = A, _Alloc = std::allocator<A>, _Args = {}]’
/usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-redhat-linux/4.6.1/../../../../include/c++/4.6.1/bits/shared_ptr.h:547:42:   instantiated from ‘std::shared_ptr<_Tp1> std::make_shared(_Args&& ...) [with _Tp = A, _Args = {}]’
testmakeshared.cpp:6:40:   instantiated from here
testmakeshared.cpp:10:8: error: ‘A::A()’ is protected
/usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-redhat-linux/4.6.1/../../../../include/c++/4.6.1/bits/shared_ptr_base.h:400:2: error: within this context

Compilation exited abnormally with code 1 at Tue Nov 15 07:32:58

This message is basically saying that some random method way down in the template instantiation stack from ::std::make_shared can't access the constructor because it's protected.

But I really want to use both ::std::make_shared and prevent anybody from making an object of this class that isn't pointed at by a ::std::shared_ptr. Is there any way to accomplish this?

  • You can mark the function deep down that needs the constructor as friend, but that won't be portable. – Dani Nov 16 '11 at 5:25
  • @Dani: Yeah, it would be nice to have a portable solution. But that would work. – Omnifarious Nov 16 '11 at 5:40

14 Answers 14

up vote 93 down vote accepted

This answer is probably better, and the one I'll likely accept. But I also came up with a method that's uglier, but does still let everything still be inline and doesn't require a derived class:

#include <memory>
#include <string>

class A {
 protected:
   struct this_is_private;

 public:
   explicit A(const this_is_private &) {}
   A(const this_is_private &, ::std::string, int) {}

   template <typename... T>
   static ::std::shared_ptr<A> create(T &&...args) {
      return ::std::make_shared<A>(this_is_private{0},
                                   ::std::forward<T>(args)...);
   }

 protected:
   struct this_is_private {
       explicit this_is_private(int) {}
   };

   A(const A &) = delete;
   const A &operator =(const A &) = delete;
};

::std::shared_ptr<A> foo()
{
   return A::create();
}

::std::shared_ptr<A> bar()
{
   return A::create("George", 5);
}

::std::shared_ptr<A> errors()
{
   ::std::shared_ptr<A> retval;

   // Each of these assignments to retval properly generates errors.
   retval = A::create("George");
   retval = new A(A::this_is_private{0});
   return ::std::move(retval);
}

Edit 2017-01-06: I changed this to make it clear that this idea is clearly and simply extensible to constructors that take arguments because other people were providing answers along those lines and seemed confused about this.

  • 11
    Actually, I am a huge fan of those meaningless structures used only as keys. I prefer this to Luc's solution, but that might be my biais against inheritance. – Matthieu M. Nov 16 '11 at 7:43
  • 2
    Agreed, I like this better as well. – ildjarn Nov 16 '11 at 19:04
  • 2
    @Berkus: Then make it protected instead of private. And by "it", I'm referring to the this_is_private class, which maybe should be renamed in such case. I usually call it constructor_access in my code. – dalle Feb 16 '14 at 14:02
  • 1
    Sadly this doesn't work if your constructor takes real parameters; in this case you can simply pass {} for the private tag without having access to the type name (tested with g++ 4.9.0). Without real parameters it tries to construct A from {}, although I have no idea why, and fails. I think making the this_is_private constructor private and providing a static method to create it fixes it, as there should be no way to access this method from the outside unless you leak the type in a member function signature. – Stefan Jul 12 '14 at 17:37
  • 3
    Stefan, if you give this_is_private a private ctor you can make class A a friend. Seems to close the loophole. – Steven Kramer Jul 18 '14 at 8:12

Looking at the requirements for std::make_shared in 20.7.2.2.6 shared_ptr creation [util.smartptr.shared.create], paragraph 1:

Requires: The expression ::new (pv) T(std::forward<Args>(args)...), where pv has type void* and points to storage suitable to hold an object of type T, shall be well formed. A shall be an allocator (17.6.3.5). The copy constructor and destructor of A shall not throw exceptions.

Since the requirement is unconditionally specified in terms of that expression and things like scope aren't taken into account, I think tricks like friendship are right out.

A simple solution is to derive from A. This needn't require making A an interface or even a polymorphic type.

// interface in header
std::shared_ptr<A> make_a();

// implementation in source
namespace {

struct concrete_A: public A {};

} // namespace

std::shared_ptr<A>
make_a()
{
    return std::make_shared<concrete_A>();
}
  • 1
    Oh, that's a very clever answer, and possibly better than another one I had thought of. – Omnifarious Nov 16 '11 at 5:41
  • +1 for beating me to it – Cheers and hth. - Alf Nov 16 '11 at 5:43
  • One question though, won't the shared_ptr delete an A and not a concrete_A, and couldn't this cause problems? – Omnifarious Nov 16 '11 at 5:51
  • 8
    Ahh, it's because shared_ptr stores a deleter at the time of instantiation, and if you're using make_shared the deleter absolutely has to be using the right type. – Omnifarious Nov 16 '11 at 6:23
  • I'm accepting your answer because it is a good answer. And while I think I like mine better, I think it's cheesy to accept your own answer when there is a perfectly acceptable answer that someone else made. – Omnifarious Nov 16 '11 at 20:16

Possibly the simplest solution. Based on the previous answer by Mohit Aron and incorporating dlf's suggestion.

#include <memory>

class A
{
public:
    static std::shared_ptr<A> create()
    {
        struct make_shared_enabler : public A {};

        return std::make_shared<make_shared_enabler>();
    }

private:
    A() {}  
};
  • 3
    if A has non-default constructors you will also need to expose them: struct make_shared_enabler : public A { template <typename... Args> make_shared_enabler(Args &&... args):A(std::forward<Args>(args)...) {} };. This makes all private constructors of A visible as make_shared_enabler constructors. Using constructors inheritance feature (using A::A;) seems doesn't help here because constructors will be still private. – anton_rh Dec 14 '15 at 6:44
  • 1
    @anton_rh: you can't add template arguments to inner classes. See here. – bobbel Feb 17 '16 at 20:20
  • Hm... Seems you are right. In my case struct was not local, but was a private struct: class A { ... private: struct A_shared_enabler; }; class A::A_shared_enabler : public A { ... }. See here cpp.sh/65qbr. – anton_rh Feb 18 '16 at 11:31

Here's a neat solution for this:

#include <memory>

class A {
   public:
     static shared_ptr<A> Create();

   private:
     A() {}

     struct MakeSharedEnabler;   
 };

struct A::MakeSharedEnabler : public A {
    MakeSharedEnabler() : A() {
    }
};

shared_ptr<A> A::Create() {
    return make_shared<MakeSharedEnabler>();
}
  • 2
    I like this. It can be made a little simpler by defining MakeSharedEnabler locally inside A::Create(). – dlf Jul 29 '14 at 13:34
  • Awesome idea Mohit it helped me a lot. – Jnana Dec 17 '16 at 10:36
struct A {
public:
  template<typename ...Arg> std::shared_ptr<A> static create(Arg&&...arg) {
    struct EnableMakeShared : public A {
      EnableMakeShared(Arg&&...arg) :A(std::forward<Arg>(arg)...) {}
    };
    return std::make_shared<EnableMakeShared>(std::forward<Arg>(arg)...);
  }
  void dump() const {
    std::cout << a_ << std::endl;
  }
private:
  A(int a) : a_(a) {}
  A(int i, int j) : a_(i + j) {}
  A(std::string const& a) : a_(a.size()) {}
  int a_;
};
  • This is largely the same thing as Luc Danton's answer, although turning it into a local class is a nice touch. Some explanation to accompany the code could make this a much better answer. – user743382 Jan 8 '15 at 7:08
  • Normally, I want to write such small function in header file but not cc file. Second, in practice, I use a macro which looks like #define SharedPtrCreate(T) template<typename ...Arg>..... – alpha Jan 8 '15 at 8:27

How about this?

static std::shared_ptr<A> create()
{
    std::shared_ptr<A> pA(new A());
    return pA;
}
  • 13
    That works great. But ::std::make_shared has functionality above and beyond simply making a shared_ptr to something. It allocates the reference count along with the object so they're located close to each other. I really, really want to use ::std::make_shared. – Omnifarious Nov 16 '11 at 5:23
  • The deleted assigment and copy operators forbid this – Dani Nov 16 '11 at 5:23
  • 5
    This is really the most straightforward approach, even though it isn't really what the question was asking. make_shared does have some nice characteristics and I try to use it wherever possible, but in this situation it seems quite likely that the run-time performance advantages of make_shared do not outweigh the extra code complexity and ceremony actually required to use it. If you really need the performance of make_shared then go crazy, but don't overlook the simplicity of just using shared_ptr's constructor. – Kevin Mar 19 '14 at 17:18
  • Be careful about memory leaks though... see this question stackoverflow.com/a/14837300/2149539 – fr4nk Jun 21 at 11:52

Since I didn't like the already provided answers I decided to search on and found a solution that is not as generic as the previous answers but I like it better(tm). In retrospect it is not much nicer than the one provided by Omnifarius but there could be other people who like it too :)

This is not invented by me, but it is the idea of Jonathan Wakely (GCC developer).

Unfortunately it does not work with all the compilers because it relies on a small change in std::allocate_shared implementation. But this change is now a proposed update for the standard libraries, so it might get supported by all the compilers in the future. It works on GCC 4.7.

C++ standard Library Working Group change request is here: http://lwg.github.com/issues/lwg-active.html#2070

The GCC patch with an example usage is here: http://old.nabble.com/Re%3A--v3--Implement-pointer_traits-and-allocator_traits-p31723738.html

The solution works on the idea to use std::allocate_shared (instead of std::make_shared) with a custom allocator that is declared friend to the class with the private constructor.

The example from the OP would look like this:

#include <memory>

template<typename Private>
struct MyAlloc : std::allocator<Private>
{
    void construct(void* p) { ::new(p) Private(); }
};

class A {
    public:
        static ::std::shared_ptr<A> create() {
            return ::std::allocate_shared<A>(MyAlloc<A>());
        }

    protected:
        A() {}
        A(const A &) = delete;
        const A &operator =(const A &) = delete;

        friend struct MyAlloc<A>;
};

int main() {
    auto p = A::create();
    return 0;
}

A more complex example that is based on the utility I'm working on. With this I could not use Luc's solution. But the one by Omnifarius could be adapted. Not that while in the previous example everybody can create an A object using the MyAlloc in this one there is not way to create A or B besides the create() method.

#include <memory>

template<typename T>
class safe_enable_shared_from_this : public std::enable_shared_from_this<T>
{
    public:
    template<typename... _Args>
        static ::std::shared_ptr<T> create(_Args&&... p_args) {
            return ::std::allocate_shared<T>(Alloc(), std::forward<_Args>(p_args)...);
        }

    protected:
    struct Alloc : std::allocator<T>
    {  
        template<typename _Up, typename... _Args>
        void construct(_Up* __p, _Args&&... __args)
        { ::new((void *)__p) _Up(std::forward<_Args>(__args)...); }
    };
    safe_enable_shared_from_this(const safe_enable_shared_from_this&) = delete;
    safe_enable_shared_from_this& operator=(const safe_enable_shared_from_this&) = delete;
};

class A : public safe_enable_shared_from_this<A> {
    private:
        A() {}
        friend struct safe_enable_shared_from_this<A>::Alloc;
};

class B : public safe_enable_shared_from_this<B> {
    private:
        B(int v) {}
        friend struct safe_enable_shared_from_this<B>::Alloc;
};

int main() {
    auto a = A::create();
    auto b = B::create(5);
    return 0;
}

I realise this thread is rather old, but I found an answer that does not require inheritance or extra arguments to the constructor that I couldn't see elsewhere. It is not portable though:

#include <memory>

#if defined(__cplusplus) && __cplusplus >= 201103L
#define ALLOW_MAKE_SHARED(x) friend void __gnu_cxx::new_allocator<test>::construct<test>(test*);
#elif defined(_WIN32) || defined(WIN32)
#if defined(_MSC_VER) && _MSC_VER >= 1800
#define ALLOW_MAKE_SHARED(x) friend class std::_Ref_count_obj;
#else
#error msc version does not suport c++11
#endif
#else
#error implement for platform
#endif

class test {
    test() {}
    ALLOW_MAKE_SHARED(test);
public:
    static std::shared_ptr<test> create() { return std::make_shared<test>(); }

};
int main() {
    std::shared_ptr<test> t(test::create());
}

I have tested on windows and linux, it may need tweaking for different platforms.

  • 1
    I'm tempted to -1 it for lack of portability. The other answers (particularly the 'key class' answers) are fairly elegant and the non-portable answer very ugly. I can't think of a reason you'd use the non-portable answer. It's not faster or anything like that. – Omnifarious Dec 24 '16 at 6:38
  • @Omnifarious It is indeed non-portable and I wouldn't recommend, but I believe this is in fact the semantically most correct solution. In my answer, I link to a proposal of adding std::shared_ptr_access to the standard, which could be seen as allowing to do the above in a simple and portable way. – Boris Jul 10 at 13:20

If you also want to enable a constuctor that takes arguments, this may help a bit.

#include <memory>
#include <utility>

template<typename S>
struct enable_make : public S
{
    template<typename... T>
    enable_make(T&&... t)
        : S(std::forward<T>(t)...)
    {
    }
};

class foo
{
public:
    static std::unique_ptr<foo> create(std::unique_ptr<int> u, char const* s)
    {
        return std::make_unique<enable_make<foo>>(std::move(u), s);
    }
protected:
    foo(std::unique_ptr<int> u, char const* s)
    {
    }
};

void test()
{
    auto fp = foo::create(std::make_unique<int>(3), "asdf");
}

Ideally, I think the perfect solution would require additions to the C++ standard. Andrew Schepler proposes the following:

(Go here for the whole thread)

we can borrow an idea from boost::iterator_core_access. I propose a new class std::shared_ptr_access with no public or protected members, and to specify that for std::make_shared(args...) and std::alloc_shared(a, args...), the expressions ::new(pv) T(forward(args)...) and ptr->~T() must be well-formed in the context of std::shared_ptr_access.

An implementation of std::shared_ptr_access might look like:

namespace std {
    class shared_ptr_access
    {
        template <typename _T, typename ... _Args>
        static _T* __construct(void* __pv, _Args&& ... __args)
        { return ::new(__pv) _T(forward<_Args>(__args)...); }

        template <typename _T>
        static void __destroy(_T* __ptr) { __ptr->~_T(); }

        template <typename _T, typename _A>
        friend class __shared_ptr_storage;
    };
}

Usage

If/when the above is added to the standard, we would simply do:

class A {
public:
   static std::shared_ptr<A> create() {
      return std::make_shared<A>();
   }

 protected:
   friend class std::shared_ptr_access;
   A() {}
   A(const A &) = delete;
   const A &operator =(const A &) = delete;
};

If this also sounds like an important addition to the standard to you, feel free to add your 2 cents to the linked isocpp Google Group.

  • 1
    I think it's a good addition to the standard, but it's not important enough for me to take the time to join the Google Group and comment and then pay attention to that group and the comment. :-) – Omnifarious Aug 8 at 20:41

There's a more hairy and interesting problem that happens when you have two strictly related classes A and B that work together.

Say A is the "master class" and B its "slave". If you want to restrict instantiation of B only to A, you'd make B's constructor private, and friend B to A like this

class B
{
public:
    // B your methods...

private:
    B();
    friend class A;
};

Unfortunately calling std::make_shared<B>() from a method of A will make the compiler complain about B::B() being private.

My solution to this is to create a public Pass dummy class (just like nullptr_t) inside B that has private constructor and is friend with A and make B's constructor public and add Pass to its arguments, like this.

class B
{
public:
  class Pass
  {
    Pass() {}
    friend class A;
  };

  B(Pass, int someArgument)
  {
  }
};

class A
{
public:
  A()
  {
    // This is valid
    auto ptr = std::make_shared<B>(B::Pass(), 42);
  }
};

class C
{
public:
  C()
  {
    // This is not
    auto ptr = std::make_shared<B>(B::Pass(), 42);
  }
};

The root of the problem is that if the function or class you friend makes lower level calls to your constructor, they have to be friended too. std::make_shared isn't the function that's actually calling your constructor so friending it makes no difference.

class A;
typedef std::shared_ptr<A> APtr;
class A
{
    template<class T>
    friend class std::_Ref_count_obj;
public:
    APtr create()
    {
        return std::make_shared<A>();
    }
private:
    A()
    {}
};

std::_Ref_count_obj is actually calling your constructor, so it needs to be a friend. Since that's a bit obscure, I use a macro

#define SHARED_PTR_DECL(T) \
class T; \
typedef std::shared_ptr<T> ##T##Ptr;

#define FRIEND_STD_MAKE_SHARED \
template<class T> \
friend class std::_Ref_count_obj;

Then your class declaration looks fairly simple. You can make a single macro for declaring the ptr and the class if you prefer.

SHARED_PTR_DECL(B);
class B
{
    FRIEND_STD_MAKE_SHARED
public:
    BPtr create()
    {
        return std::make_shared<B>();
    }
private:
    B()
    {}
};

This is actually an important issue. To make maintainable, portable code you need to hide as much of the implementation as possible.

typedef std::shared_ptr<A> APtr;

hides how you're handling your smart pointer a bit, you have to be sure to use your typedef. But if you always have to create one using make_shared, it defeats the purpose.

The above example forces code using your class to use your smart pointer constructor, which means that if you switch to a new flavor of smart pointer, you change your class declaration and you have a decent chance of being finished. DO NOT assume your next boss or project will use stl, boost etc. plan for changing it someday.

Doing this for almost 30 years, I've paid a big price in time, pain and side effects to repair this when it was done wrong years ago.

You can use this:

class CVal
{
    friend std::shared_ptr<CVal>;
    friend std::_Ref_count<CVal>;
public:
    static shared_ptr<CVal> create()
    {
        shared_ptr<CVal> ret_sCVal(new CVal());
        return ret_sCVal;
    }

protected:
    CVal() {};
    ~CVal() {};
};
  • 1
    Doesn't use std::make_shared. – Brian Nov 4 '15 at 22:49
#include <iostream>
#include <memory>

class A : public std::enable_shared_from_this<A>
{
private:
    A(){}
    explicit A(int a):m_a(a){}
public:
    template <typename... Args>
    static std::shared_ptr<A> create(Args &&... args)
    {
        class make_shared_enabler : public A
        {
        public:
            make_shared_enabler(Args &&... args):A(std::forward<Args>(args)...){}
        };
        return std::make_shared<make_shared_enabler>(std::forward<Args>(args)...);
    }

    int val() const
    {
        return m_a;
    }
private:
    int m_a=0;
};

int main(int, char **)
{
    std::shared_ptr<A> a0=A::create();
    std::shared_ptr<A> a1=A::create(10);
    std::cout << a0->val() << " " << a1->val() << std::endl;
    return 0;
}

protected by StoryTeller Sep 13 at 6:41

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