11

Can anyone suggest a JSON parser that allows any kind of comments, with PHP bindings - need the comments badly for config files but json_decode doesn't support them.

(I am aware of: 1. other format such as YAML, 2. comments are not part of the standard)

Update:

Why don't we use:

  • YAML: Benchmarks show it's slower - and we might want to send the data over the wire - not sure if YAML is best for that.

  • XML: too verbose - simple human editing is a requirement. And no need for the extended features of XML.

  • INI: there is hierarchy and nesting of variable depth in the data. And we need a ubiquitous format as the data might be distributed with apps or work with apps in other languages.

  • Pre-processing: data can be contributed and shared by users, tough to impose a requirement to pre-process before adding data to an app.

  • 1
    What are the comments for? Human or computer reading? – heldt Nov 16 '11 at 8:43
  • 2
    You could run the JSON string through a pre-processing parser which strips all comments – knittl Nov 16 '11 at 8:44
  • 1
    I can only second Gordon. Use a format which can give you what you expect from it, instead of raping another format which is just not for that purpose in its current state. – kapa Nov 16 '11 at 8:50
  • 1
    @bazmegakapa: It's not raping - it's consensual:) The standard does allow for parsers to support extensions. – Basel Shishani Nov 16 '11 at 9:19
  • 1
    @heldt: comments are for humans - for now - in any case, we would like the parser to ignore them gracefully. – Basel Shishani Nov 16 '11 at 9:40
10
+50

If you need portability and don't want any pre-processing to fixup non-standard components, then YAML is probably the way to go.

Most, if not all, of JSON is compatible with YAML (YAML is a superset of JSON), and it supports comments.

For a recent project I felt the need to move away from .ini for our "default settings" file - so that we no longer had to convert some strings to integers or booleans afterwards (since parse_ini_file parses values as strings, foo=1 or foo=true are both string values).

JSON seemed like a good format, but it didn't support comments. If you want to make this work, however, I would recommend not implementing (or using) a separate JSON parser altogether. What I did was create a simple wrapper function that strips out the comments with a regex, and then use the native json_decode.

An example from https://github.com/countervandalism/stillalive/blob/v2018.11/src/Util.php#L21-L41:

class JsonUtil {
    /**
     * From https://stackoverflow.com/a/10252511/319266
     * @return array|false
     */
    public static function load( $filename ) {
        $contents = @file_get_contents( $filename );
        if ( $contents === false ) {
            return false;
        }
        return json_decode( self::stripComments( $contents ), true );
    }
    /**
     * From https://stackoverflow.com/a/10252511/319266
     * @param string $str
     * @return string
     */
    protected static function stripComments( $str ) {
        return preg_replace( '![ \t]*//.*[ \t]*[\r\n]!', '', $str );
    }
}
|improve this answer|||||
  • 1
    What are the leading and trailing ! in the regex for? – John Archer Mar 4 at 8:43
  • 1
    @JohnArcher Good question! The ! bangs here serve as the regex delimiters – taking the place of the traditional / slashes. My regex here includes slashes itself, which means those would otherwise need to be escaped. You might also sometimes see #, % or ~ used as delimiters. See also php.net/regexp.reference.delimiters. – Timo Tijhof Mar 5 at 23:11
  • That is interesting, thanks a lot. I tried this on regex101.com, but it does not work there. See this example: regex101.com/r/q6SFFT/1 If I fix the "unescaped delimiter" problem the site does not recognize ! (or other delimiters) as delimiters but matches the character literally. Is this because the site simply does not support this, but PHP's preg_replace() does? – John Archer Mar 6 at 8:22
  • 1
    @JohnArcher The delimiters are not part of the pattern, they are only an encoding and do not change the behaviour of the regex. The website at your link has the delimiters already set (in light grey). This means a bang ! within that, would be treated as literal part of the pattern, not as delimiter. Effectively, your link is running /!…!/, instead of !…! or /…/. Similarly, if I were to enter / there, it would also fail. As that would be //…// instead of /…/. See regex101.com/r/8Smo5h/1 and regex101.com/r/NVY6f1/1. – Timo Tijhof Mar 6 at 19:33
4

You can use the following function to decode commented json:

function json_decode_commented($json, $assoc = false, $maxDepth = 512, $opts = 0) {
  $data = preg_replace('~
    (" (?:[^"\\\\] | \\\\\\\\ | \\\\")*+ ") | \# [^\v]*+ | // [^\v]*+ | /\* .*? \*/
  ~xs', '$1', $data);

  return json_decode($json, $assoc, $maxDepth, $opts);
}

It supports all PHP-style comments: /*, #, //. String values are preserved as is.

|improve this answer|||||
2

Comments are not part of JSON, so a "JSON parser" is not required to accept comments..

I'd use YAML. Even if parsing is slightly slower (PHP has a native JSON parser but no native YAML parser) it's probably neglectible and if it's not, you can always cache the parsed object. Besides that, since the PHP JSON parser does not support comments you'd have to use a non-native one, i.e. it most likely wouldn't be faster than the YAML parser (assuming both are well-written)

|improve this answer|||||
1

Another option is to allow your users to insert comments as unused fields in the JSON structure:

{
  "color": "red",
  "color//": "may be red, green or blue"
}

If you only use your JSON for input, and it's never machine-saved, you could abuse the format to use the same field repeatedly, incidentally achieving a near-wipe of the comments when parsing (as usually only the first or the last value of a field will be retained in a parsed structure):

{
  "color": "red",      "//":"may be red, green or blue",
  "shape": "circle",   "//":"use circle, square or triangle",
  "timeout": 5,        "//":"timeout in seconds; default is 10"
}
|improve this answer|||||

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.