51

I'm writing a script which will have to work on directories which are modified by hand by Windows and Linux users alike. The Windows users tend to not care at all about case in assigning filenames.

Is there a way to handle this on the Linux side in Python, i.e. can I get a case-insensitive, glob-like behaviour?

9 Answers 9

56

You can replace each alphabetic character c with [cC], via

import glob
def insensitive_glob(pattern):
    def either(c):
        return '[%s%s]' % (c.lower(), c.upper()) if c.isalpha() else c
    return glob.glob(''.join(map(either, pattern)))
5
  • 3
    To be a little more pythonic...or at least make pylint happy return glob.glob(''.join(either(char) for char in pattern))
    – shao.lo
    Apr 26, 2015 at 1:55
  • 8
    shao.lo: Yes, that does have the advantage of being longer. Apr 26, 2015 at 3:55
  • 2
    This solution has serious drawbacks, so be careful. First, glob() will fail using this kind of pattern on Windows drive letter. Then, the same apply when using "magic" folders such as "sysnative" folder.
    – payet_s
    Jun 22, 2016 at 11:00
  • This seems hacky, but yeah it gets the job done doesn't it. It works fine for me.
    – Tristan
    Oct 15, 2018 at 15:07
  • 1
    @GeoffreyIrving Ha, and slower...(pattern of size 1k shown) python In[10] %timeit ''.join(either(char) for char in pattern) 392 µs ± 5.9 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 1000 loops each) In[11] %timeit ''.join(map(either, pattern)) 358 µs ± 7.68 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 1000 loops each) Dec 18, 2020 at 22:28
33

Use case-insensitive regexes instead of glob patterns. fnmatch.translate generates a regex from a glob pattern, so

re.compile(fnmatch.translate(pattern), re.IGNORECASE)

gives you a case-insensitive version of a glob pattern as a compiled RE.

Keep in mind that, if the filesystem is hosted by a Linux box on a Unix-like filesystem, users will be able to create files foo, Foo and FOO in the same directory.

4
  • cool 8) is there also a function to then return the list of matching filenames, or do i manually have to go through cascades of os.listdir()?
    – andreas-h
    Nov 16, 2011 at 13:14
  • 1
    after 2 hours of fiddling around with os.walk, i'm at at a loss. could you please advice a bit more? i'm having a hard time figuring out the looping around the dirs, matching the re and breaking appropriately. probably not my day :(
    – andreas-h
    Nov 16, 2011 at 15:44
  • @andreash: os.walk returns triples (basepath, dirs, files) s.t. you can get the relative path to a dir or file by joining it (os.path.join) with basepath. You can then try to match the result with your pattern.
    – Fred Foo
    Nov 16, 2011 at 15:51
  • 2
    i'll accept this answer, as it gives a valid response. however, i decided to use a more tailor-made combination of os.walk and os.listdir, for speed reasons.
    – andreas-h
    Jan 18, 2012 at 12:50
8

Non recursively

In order to retrieve the files (and files only) of a directory "path", with "globexpression":

list_path = [i for i in os.listdir(path) if os.path.isfile(os.path.join(path, i))]
result = [os.path.join(path, j) for j in list_path if re.match(fnmatch.translate(globexpression), j, re.IGNORECASE)]

Recursively

with walk:

result = []
for root, dirs, files in os.walk(path, topdown=True):
    result += [os.path.join(root, j) for j in files \
        if re.match(fnmatch.translate(globexpression), j, re.IGNORECASE)]

Better also compile the regular expression, so instead of

re.match(fnmatch.translate(globexpression)

do (before the loop):

reg_expr = re.compile(fnmatch.translate(globexpression), re.IGNORECASE)

and then replace in the loop:

result += [os.path.join(root, j) for j in files if re.match(reg_expr, j)]
2

Here is my non-recursive file search for Python with glob like behavior for Python 3.5+

# Eg: find_files('~/Downloads', '*.Xls', ignore_case=True)
def find_files(path: str, glob_pat: str, ignore_case: bool = False):
    rule = re.compile(fnmatch.translate(glob_pat), re.IGNORECASE) if ignore_case \
            else re.compile(fnmatch.translate(glob_pat))
    return [n for n in os.listdir(os.path.expanduser(path)) if rule.match(n)]

Note: This version handles home directory expansion

2
  • This works except one cannot use wildcards anywhere in the path, only in the file. Oct 12, 2020 at 16:37
  • @MatthewSnyder - Thanks. When I get some time, I'll update it to handle wildcards in path also. Oct 12, 2020 at 17:11
1

Depending on your case, you might use .lower() on both file pattern and results from folder listing and only then compare the pattern with the filename

1

Riffing off of @Timothy C. Quinn's answer, this modification allows the use of wildcards anywhere in the path. This is admittedly only case insensitive for the glob_pat argument.

import re
import os
import fnmatch
import glob

def find_files(path: str, glob_pat: str, ignore_case: bool = False):
    rule = re.compile(fnmatch.translate(glob_pat), re.IGNORECASE) if ignore_case \
            else re.compile(fnmatch.translate(glob_pat))
    return [n for n in glob.glob(os.path.join(path, '*')) if rule.match(n)]
0

Here is a working example with fnmatch.translate():

from glob import glob
from pathlib import Path
import fnmatch, re


mask_str = '"*_*_yyww.TXT" | "*_yyww.TXT" | "*_*_yyww_*.TXT" | "*_yyww_*.TXT"'
masks_list = ["yyyy", "yy", "mmmmm", "mmm", "mm", "#d", "#w", "#m", "ww"]

for mask_item in masks_list:
    mask_str = mask_str.replace(mask_item, "*")

clean_quotes_and_spaces = mask_str.replace(" ", "").replace('"', '')
remove_double_star = clean_quotes_and_spaces.replace("**", "*")
masks = remove_double_star.split("|")

cwd = Path.cwd()

files = list(cwd.glob('*'))
print(files)

files_found = set()

for mask in masks:
    mask = re.compile(fnmatch.translate(mask), re.IGNORECASE)
    print(mask)

    for file in files:        
        if mask.match(str(file)):
            files_found.add(file)         

print(files_found)
0

I just wanted a variant of this where I only went case insensitive if I was specifying a file extension -- eg, I wanted ".jpg" and ".JPG" to be crawled the same. This is my variant:

import re
import glob
import os
from fnmatch import translate as regexGlob
from platform import system as getOS

def linuxGlob(globPattern:str) -> frozenset:
    """
    Glob with a case-insensitive file extension
    """
    base = set(glob.glob(globPattern, recursive= True))
    maybeExt = os.path.splitext(os.path.basename(globPattern))[1][1:]
    caseChange = set()
    # Now only try the extended insensitivity if we've got a file extension
    if len(maybeExt) > 0 and getOS() != "Windows":
        rule = re.compile(regexGlob(globPattern), re.IGNORECASE)
        endIndex = globPattern.find("*")
        if endIndex == -1:
            endIndex = len(globPattern)
        crawl = os.path.join(os.path.dirname(globPattern[:endIndex]), "**", "*")
        checkSet = set(glob.glob(crawl, recursive= True)) - base
        caseChange = set([x for x in checkSet if rule.match(x)])
    return frozenset(base.union(caseChange))

I didn't actually restrict the insensitivity to just the extension because I was lazy, but that confusion space is pretty small (eg, you'd want to capture FOO.jpg and FOO.JPG but not foo.JPG or foo.jpg; if your path is that pathological you've got other problems)

0
def insensitive_glob(pattern):
    def either(c):
        return '[%s%s]' % (c.lower(), c.upper()) if c.isalpha() else c
    return glob.glob(''.join(map(either, pattern)))

also can be:

def insensitive_glob(pattern):
    return glob.glob(
        ''.join([
            '[' + c.lower() + c.upper() + ']'
            if c.isalpha() else c
            for c in pattern
        ])
    )

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